This Tiny Island in Florida Is Home to America's Wealthiest Zip Code

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iStock

Situated just off the coast of Miami and Miami Beach (you can see it from South Beach), Fisher Island—a secluded, picturesque island that’s reachable only by boat, water taxi, or helicopter—is the richest ZIP code in America, according to a new analysis by Bloomberg. With residents averaging an income of $2.5 million in 2015, the elite island (ZIP code 33109) is home to some of the world’s top earners (including Oprah Winfrey, once upon a time).

Bloomberg analyzed IRS data from 2015 to create its ranking of the top 20 ZIP codes by average adjusted gross income. To be considered, a ZIP code needed to have at least 500 households and needed to have filed more than 200 tax returns as of 2015.

Although such rankings can be “skewed by outliers,” Bloomberg notes that more than half of the tax returns in Fisher Island showed an income of over $200,000. The island was once the winter estate of wealthy businessman William K. Vanderbilt but is now an “ultra-private” residential community, according to the Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau. Athletes, models, top executives, and lawyers are just some of the professionals who call 33109 home.

Other cities and towns on the list might surprise you. While ZIP codes in California, New York, and Florida certainly crop up several times, communities in Illinois, Wyoming, and Pennsylvania also make appearances. Here’s the full list of the top 20 wealthiest ZIP codes in America:

1. Fisher Island, Miami Beach, Florida (33109)
2. Atherton, California (94027)
3. Palm Beach, Florida (33480)
4. Palo Alto, California (94301)
5. Harrison, New York (10577)
6. Gladwyne, Pennsylvania (19035)
7. Century City, Los Angeles, California (90067)
8. Kenilworth, Illinois (60043)
9. Weston, Massachusetts (02493)
10. San Francisco, California (94111)
11. Far Hills, New Jersey (07931)
12. Boston, Massachusetts (02110)
13. Portola Valley, California (94028)
14. Moose Wilson Road, Wyoming (83014)
15. Naples, Florida (34102)
16. Medina, Washington (98039)
17. Riverside, Connecticut (06878)
18. Old Westbury, New York (11568)
19. Glencoe, Illinois (60022)
20. Greenwich, Connecticut (06831)

[h/t: Bloomberg]

People Are Stocking Their Little Free Libraries With Food and Toilet Paper to Help Neighbors

A Little Free Library full of canned goods in Chicago.
A Little Free Library full of canned goods in Chicago.
Ashley Hamer, Twitter

Across the nation, people are stocking their Little Free Libraries with food, toilet paper, and other necessities as a creative way to lend a helping hand to neighbors in need without breaking the rules of social distancing.

Many of the makeshift pantries encourage people to pay it forward with handwritten messages like “Take what you need, share what you can,” and other similar adaptations of Little Free Library’s “Take a book, leave a book” motto. Some people have completely emptied the books from their libraries to make room for non-perishables like peanut butter, canned soup, and pasta, while others still have a little space devoted to reading material—which, although it might not be quite as important as a hearty meal, can keep you relaxed and entertained during quarantine.

As Literary Hub explains, donating to a Little Free Library-turned-pantry near you isn’t just a great way to help neighbors who can’t make it to the store (or can’t find what they need on increasingly low-stocked shelves). It could also combat feelings of powerlessness or loneliness brought on by self-isolation; by giving what you can spare—and seeing what others have contributed—you’re fostering a sense of community that exists even without the face-to-face contact you’re probably used to.

Greig Metzger, the executive director of the Little Free Library organization, suggests that people even use their Little Free Libraries as collection points for larger food donations to nearby charities.

“Food shelves everywhere are facing increased demand,” Metzger, who served as an executive director for a Minneapolis food shelf before joining Little Free Library, wrote in a blog post. “You can find the food shelf nearest you by doing a Google search for ‘food shelf near me.’ Perhaps use your Little Free Library to host a food drive to help that local food shelf.”

You can also look for Little Free Libraries in your area using this interactive map.

Looking for other ways to help your community fight the wide-reaching effects of the new coronavirus? Here are seven things you can do.

[h/t Literary Hub]

Dreaming of Your Favorite City? This Website Will Create a Personalized Haiku Poem About It for You

OpenStreetMap Haiku will capture the colorful character of your hometown in a few (possibly silly) phrases.
OpenStreetMap Haiku will capture the colorful character of your hometown in a few (possibly silly) phrases.
vladystock/iStock via Getty Images

You no longer need to spend all your free time struggling to capture the vibe of your favorite city in a few carefully chosen syllables—OpenStreetMap Haiku will do it for you.

The site, developed by Satellite Studio, uses the information from crowdsourced global map OpenStreetMap to create a haiku that describes any location in the world. According to Travel + Leisure, the poems are based on data points like supermarkets, shops, local air quality, weather, time of day, and more.

“Looking at every aspect of the surroundings of a point, we can generate a poem about any place in the world,” the developers wrote in a blog post. “The result is sometimes fun, often weird, most of the time pretty terrible. Also probably horrifying for haiku purists (sorry).”

The results are also often waggishly accurate. For example, here’s a haiku describing Washington, D.C.:

“The same pot of coffee
Fresh coffee from Starbucks
The desk clerk.”

In other words, it seems like the city runs on compulsive coffee refills and paperwork. And if you thought life in Brooklyn, New York, was a combination of alcohol-fueled outings to basement bars and traffic-filled trips into the city, this poem probably confirms your suspicions:

“Getting drunk at The Nest
Today in New York
Green. Red. Green. Red.”

The website’s creators were inspired by Naho Matsuda’s Every Thing Every Time, a 2018 art installation outside Theatre Royal in Newcastle, England, that used data points to generate an ever-changing poem about the city.

Wondering what OpenStreetMap Haiku has to say about your hometown? Explore the map here.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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