16 Fashion Rules the Royal Family Lives By

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DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS, AFP/Getty Images; John Stillwell, WPA Pool/Getty Images; Chris Jackson, Getty Images; JOHN STILLWELL, AFP/Getty Images; Chris Jackson-Pool, Getty Images; ARTHUR EDWARDS, AFP/Getty Images; David Rose, WPA Pool/Getty Images; Gareth Cattermole, Getty Images

The British royal family abides by a very specific—and strict—style guide. And though it must be tough to appear prim and proper all the time, the queen's handful of sartorial rules have kept the family looking posh and avoiding potentially embarrassing faux pas for 60-plus years. When should one wear their military garb? What else might clutches be good for, beyond carrying breath mints and lipstick? It's all in the (figurative) handbook! Below are 16 royal fashion do's and definite don'ts.

1. BRIGHT COLORS ARE A NECESSITY FOR THE QUEEN.

Queen Elizabeth II in a variety of colorful coats and hats.
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After all, she wants to be noticed. Throughout her 66-year reign, Queen Elizabeth II has sported monochromatic fuchsia, lime green, and canary yellow outfits from her wardrobe, which boasts every (yes, every!) color of the rainbow. The uniform is quite sensible, though: She wants to guarantee the public can see her through the crowd.

"She needs to stand out for people to be able to say, 'I saw the Queen,'" her daughter-in-law, Sophie, Countess of Wessex, explained in the 2016 documentary The Queen at 90. "Don't forget that when she turns up somewhere, crowds are two-, three-, four-, 10-, 15-deep, and someone wants to be able to say they saw a bit of the queen's hat as she went past."

2. HATS FOR WOMEN ARE A MUST.

Portrait of then-Princess Elizabeth holding her daughter, Princess Anne, with the grandmothers Queen Mary (left) and Queen Elizabeth, following the christening in October 1950.
Portrait of then-Princess Elizabeth holding her daughter, Princess Anne, with the grandmothers Queen Mary (left) and Queen Elizabeth, following the christening in October 1950.
Central Press, Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Royal etiquette requires one be worn by women to all official events. It's a stipulation that dates back to the 1950s, a time when women were starting to ditch their hats when going out in public. Though further modernization has eased up on the rule—Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton's perfect blowout is proof enough—the Queen insists the tradition be kept alive, especially at formal engagements like weddings and christenings. In fact, she rarely forgoes a headpiece, often trading a hat for a crown or headscarf.

The most important rule: Hats are discarded after 6 p.m., when it's time to break out the tiaras!

3. TIARAS ARE LIKE WEDDING RINGS.

Queen Elizabeth, Princess Anne, Princess Diana, and Duchess Catherine all wearing tiaras at various events.
Queen Elizabeth, Princess Anne, Princess Diana, and Duchess Catherine all wearing tiaras at various events.
Queen Elizabeth: Chris Jackson, WPA Pool/Getty Images. Princess Anne: Jeff Spicer, Getty Images. Princess Diana: Lionel Cherruault Royal Picture Library, Alamy Stock Photo. Duchess Catherine: Paul Hackett, WPA Pool/Getty Images.

Yes, only married women of the family get to don the jewels. That's because tiaras signify relationship status—and let curious bachelors know if a woman is off limits.

"It signals the crowning of love and the loss of innocence to marriage," Geoffrey Munn, the author of Tiaras: A History of Splendour, explained to Forbes. "The family tiara was worn by the bride and from that moment onwards it was the groom's jewelry she was expected to wear. It was a subliminal message that she had moved from her own family to another."

According to Munn, Princess Diana was the last royal to strictly adhere to the family jewels portion of the tradition—she came from the aristocracy and wore her family's Spencer tiara at her 1981 wedding to Prince Charles. Kate Middleton donned her first tiara, a Cartier halo piece borrowed from the Queen's collection, on her 2011 wedding day. And though it has yet to be confirmed, it is rumored that Meghan Markle will likely pay tribute to Prince Harry's mother by wearing one of the late Princess Diana's tiaras at her May 19 vows. As an American, odds of Markle having a "family tiara" are pretty low.

4. YOUNG PRINCES NEVER WEAR PANTS.

Prince Charles, Prince William, and Prince George all wearing proper shorts as children.
Prince Charles, Prince William, and Prince George all wearing proper shorts as children.
Prince Charles: STF, AFP/Getty Images. Prince William: PA Images, Alamy Stock Photo. Prince George: Richard Pohle, WPA Pool/Getty Images.

There are no dinosaur sweatpants in Prince George's closet. Like his father, Prince William, and his Uncle Harry, the 4-year-old heir—he's third in line to the throne—will only attend public events wearing smart shorts and never pants.

"Trousers are for older boys and men, whereas shorts on young boys is one of those silent markers that we have in England," British etiquette expert William Hanson told Harper's Bazaar. "A pair of trousers on a young boy is considered quite middle class—quite suburban. And no self-respecting aristo or royal would want to be considered suburban."

The tradition actually dates back to the 16th century and the practice of breeching, or when a tot grew out of gowns and moved on to, well, breeches. Adds Hanson, "The usual custom is that a boy graduated to trousers around 8 years old."

5. GLOVES ARE FOR PROTECTION.

Queen Elizabeth II meets trainee firefighters as she tours the new London Fire Brigade Headquarters at Southwark in February 2008.
Queen Elizabeth II meets trainee firefighters as she tours the new London Fire Brigade Headquarters at Southwark in February 2008.
Chris Jackson, Getty Images

Sure, they're fashionable. But gloves are also a safety measure favored by the Queen when attending an official engagement that requires her to shake hands with a lot of people. The accessory—which the royal glove maker says are almost always either black or white and made out of cotton and nylon—prevents the spread of germs.

One notable exception to the rule was Princess Diana, who preferred to actually hold the hands of those she met during public visits. She wasn't dubbed the people's princess for nothing!

6. ALWAYS HAVE A BLACK ENSEMBLE ON-HAND.

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, leaving their airplane as they return from Kenya following the death of King George VI in February 1952.
Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, leaving their airplane as they return from Kenya following the death of King George VI in February 1952.
Keystone, Hulton Archive/Getty Images

You'll rarely see a royal wearing black, but while traveling outside the country, they are required to pack a full black outfit in case of emergency. This is so that, if a family member dies, they'll arrive back in England dressed appropriately, since they will certainly be photographed when departing the plane.

Queen Elizabeth learned this lesson from experience. In 1952, then just a princess, she and her husband, then the Duke of Edinburgh, were in Kenya when she learned her father had passed. When she arrived back in Britain without appropriate clothing, she was forced to stay on the plane until a black outfit was delivered to her.

Still, outside of mourning, black is considered a major faux pas. You'll only see the hue worn on Remembrance Day, a memorial observed for those who have died in battle.

7. COATS MUST STAY ON.

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge keeps her coat on while visiting Waikato Hospice Rainbow Place in Cambridge, New Zealand in 2014.
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge keeps her coat on while visiting Waikato Hospice Rainbow Place in Cambridge, New Zealand in 2014.
Peter Drury, Getty Images

Etiquette bars female members of the family from removing their outermost layer in public, viewing it as an "unladylike action." So, unfortunately, if the temperature suddenly spikes, Duchess Kate just has to sweat it out.

8. NAILS ARE TO BE KEPT SUBTLE.

A close-up of Kate Middleton's manicure.
A close-up of Kate Middleton's manicure.
Andrew Chin, Getty Images

Bright colors are saved only for the Queen's wardrobe. The rules state that fingernails must be a practical and natural shade, meaning the royal manicurists favor pale pinks and clear polishes. In fact, since 1989, the Queen has been faithfully using the Essie shade Ballet Slippers.

Kate Middleton, however, has found a loophole: The Duchess dares to wear red on her toes.

9. HANDBAGS AREN'T JUST FOR BELONGINGS.

Queen Elizabeth II holds her black Launer handbag during a reception in 2017.
Queen Elizabeth II holds her black Launer handbag during a reception in 2017.
Hannah McKay, WPA Pool/Getty Images

It's not like she needs house keys! While the Queen is known to pack lipstick and reading glasses in her purse, she also uses her iconic Launer bags to send signals to her staff. For example, when she wants to leave a dinner, she sets the purse on top of the table, letting her aides know to wrap up in five minutes. Or, if she's in the middle of a dull conversation, she'll place her bag on the floor, giving a cue to her lady-in-waiting that she'd like to be rescued.

10. CLUTCHES ARE GOOD IN A BIND.

Princess Diana stepping out of a car.
ERIC FEFERBERG, AFP/Getty Images

To avoid an embarrassing slip up, Princess Diana relied on her custom clutches to shield her chest while stepping out of cars, thus keeping paparazzi from getting their money shot.

"We used to laugh when we designed what she called her 'cleavage bags,'" Anya Hindmarch told The Telegraph of when Diana would buy her clutches. "[They were] little satin clutches which she would cover her cleavage with when she stepped out of cars."

Duchess Kate uses hers as a safety net. If she does not want to shake hands while on a visit, she will hold her bag in front of her with both hands, appearing too occupied to reach out. (The public is not allowed to touch a royal family member unless they make the first move.)

11. WEDGES ARE LOOKED DOWN ON.

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge wears wedges while on a tour in Singapore in 2012.
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge wears wedges while on a tour in Singapore in 2012.
Chris Jackson, Getty Images

At least, in the Queen's mind. They're not completely banned, but one palace insider told Vanity Fair wedged heels are not favored by the Queen and that "it's well known among the women in the family." Kate would often wear her beloved Stuart Weitzmans when her grandmother-in-law wasn't present, but it's been a few years since she's been out in a pair.

12. DON'T FORGET PANTYHOSE.

Sophie Rhys-Jones, Countess of Wessex, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall watch the Order of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle in June 2011.
Sophie Rhys-Jones, Countess of Wessex, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, and Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall watch the Order of the Garter procession at Windsor Castle in June 2011.
Paul Edwards, WPA Pool/Getty Images

No bylaw explicitly states pantyhose are a must. But, it's an unspoken rule that the Queen expects—and enforces—female family members and their guests to wear tights to all public outings.

That being said, newcomer and resident rule breaker Meghan Markle skipped nude stockings during her November engagement photo call. She quickly learned her lesson, though. At Commonwealth Day at Westminster Abbey in March, the Suits actress slipped on a pair.

13. WEIGH DOWN HEMLINES.

Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge speaks to soldiers as she arrives at Calgary Airport on July 7, 2011 in Calgary, Canada.
Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, speaks to soldiers in 2011 in Calgary, Canada.
Chris Jackson, Getty Images

Otherwise suffer a Marilyn moment. In her custom dresses, the Queen has small, lead curtain weights sewn inside her hemlines. Though they weigh less than an ounce each, they keep her skirts from flying up if there were to be a sudden gust of wind.

As a fan of billowy dresses, Kate Middleton has taken note of this tailored trick after several stiff breezes have threatened to show London (and likely France) a glimpse of her underpants.

14. MILITARY UNIFORMS ARE TO BE WORN AT THE MOST FORMAL EVENTS.

Princess Anne, Prince Charles, Prince William, Prince Harry, and Prince Philip all wear their military uniforms during 2015's Trooping the Colour.
Princess Anne, Prince Charles, Prince William, Prince Harry, and Prince Philip all wear their military uniforms during 2015's Trooping the Colour.
Chris Jackson, Getty Images

Since the 19th century, it has been customary for royals who have served in the armed forces or hold honorary military titles to wear their ceremonial uniforms at special, formal events, such as Remembrance Day, the Trooping the Colour, or any service honoring the British troops. The Queen's daughter, Princess Anne, who has 24 honorary military appointments, has been notable in wearing a military uniform to these formal events. According to Slate, it's thought that she may be the first royal woman to dress in military attire publicly since Elizabeth I in 1588.

At his 2011 vows, Prince William donned his red Colonel, Irish Guards uniform because he had recently been appointed to the position. After the ceremony, however, he changed into a double-breasted tuxedo for the reception.

Will Harry follow suit on his big day? Because he is no longer a serving officer, it's not required for him to wear his uniform. So he can choose between that or the slightly less formal morning dress, much like his father did—Prince Charles wore his naval commander uniform for his 1981 wedding at St. Paul's Cathedral, but chose morning dress for his 2005 civic ceremony with Camilla Parker Bowles, now the Duchess of Cornwall.

15. USE FASHION TO COMPLIMENT HOSTS WHILE TRAVELING ABROAD.

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a maple leaf brooch and her hat featured a maple leaf design while on a trip to Canada in September 2016.
The Duchess of Cambridge wore a maple leaf brooch and her hat featured a maple leaf design while on a trip to Canada in September 2016.
Dominic Lipinski-Pool, Getty Images

While traveling, the family will pay tribute to a country they are visiting by sporting the national color or by incorporating a meaningful emblem into their outfits. For example, the Queen has worn jade green while visiting Ireland, while Kate has worn a maple leaf brooch and hat on trips to Canada. During a trip to India, Kate sported a piece by a local designer, bringing them so much attention their website crashed hours later.

16. DENIM ISN'T FORBIDDEN, BUT IT'S NOT PREFERRED.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry attend a Wheelchair Tennis match during the Invictus Games 2017 in Toronto, Canada.
Meghan Markle and Prince Harry attend a Wheelchair Tennis match during the Invictus Games 2017 in Toronto, Canada.
Vaughn Ridley, Getty Images for the Invictus Games Foundation

It's certainly not a go-to item in any royal closet. For more casual outings, women in the family tend to favor trousers, cardigans, and blazers, while men take to polo or button-down shirts and khaki pants. But the BBC interviewed an etiquette expert who explained that most of the time jeans are a no-go, "but if the duchess is outside walking the dogs for example, then jeans are fine."

Essentially, it's better to be overdressed than underdressed, so denim tends to be for private life only.

It’s National Cookie Day! Here’s Where to Score Some Free Treats

UMeimages/iStock via Getty Images
UMeimages/iStock via Getty Images

If you plan on eating as many baked goods as possible this December, now's your chance to get a head start. Today—December 4—is National Cookie Day, and chains across the country are celebrating by handing out free cookies. Here are the best places to snag a treat before the day is over.

    • Great American Cookies, a chain that's concentrated in the southeastern U.S., is marking the day by rewarding members of its loyalty program. If you already have the loyalty app, you can swing by a participating location any time today and pick up your free original chocolate chip cookie without making any additional purchases. The promotion only applies to customers who signed up for the program before midnight on December 3, so you aren't eligible for the free snack if you download the app on your way to the store.
    • The cookie giant Mrs. Fields is also participating in the holiday. Buy anything from one of the chain's stores on December 4 and you'll get a free cookie with your purchase. If you spring for the Nutcracker Sweet Tower, which is made from five festive containers of baked goods, you can send a Mrs. Fields Peace, Love & Cookies 30 Nibbler Tin to a friend for free.
    • But what if you're looking for a free cookie with no strings attached? Surprisingly, a hotel chain may be offering the best deal for National Cookie Day. Throughout December 4, you can stop by a DoubleTree by Hilton and ask for a free cookie at the front desk. DoubleTree provides complimentary cookies to guests at check-in all year round, and every year on National Cookie Day, the hotel chain extends that offer to everyone.

There's no shortage of great cookies across the U.S. If you're willing to travel to satisfy your sweet tooth, here are the best chocolate chip cookies in all 50 states.

28 Offbeat Holidays You Can Celebrate in December

nicescene/iStock via Getty Images
nicescene/iStock via Getty Images

Whether you're a holiday season fanatic who wants even more to celebrate, or a Scrooge with a burning desire to buck tradition, we've got plenty of unconventional observances to put on your calendar.

1. December 3: Giving Tuesday

After indulging on Thanksgiving, and shopping on Friday, Monday, and probably the whole weekend in between, Giving Tuesday—which occurs annually on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving—encourages people to engage in charitable activities.

2. December 4: National Cookie Day

Cookie dough on a tray.
ThitareeSarmkasat/iStock via Getty Images

December isn’t exactly lacking in opportunities to indulge in sweet treats, but today it’s your offbeat-holiday-given right to mix, bake, and/or eat as many cookies as you can handle.

3. December 5: Bathtub Party Day

There's a lot to be done between now and the end of the year. Take a minute to breathe, relax, and take in a soak.

4. December 5: International Ninja Day

The official website of Ninja Day alleges this holiday not only honors all things stealth and nunchucks, but also combats the more nautical offbeat holiday Talk Like a Pirate Day, which takes place in September. Creep, sneak, or redirect all of your URLs to Ninja activity—as long as you forgo the “arrrr matey’s” and eye patches for ominous silence and masks, you’re correctly celebrating this international holiday.

5. December 6: National Pawnbrokers Day

A neon pawnshop sign
solitude72/iStock via Getty Images

If you thought good ol' St. Nicholas was the patron saint of reindeer and stockings, think again: The actual Nikolaos of Myra was the patron of things like the falsely accused and pawnbrokers, and on this day we acknowledge the latter.

6. December 9: Weary Willie Day

Professional clown Emmett Kelly created one of the more memorable clown characters of the 20th century: “Weary Willie.” Unlike many of his clown predecessors, Weary Willie opted out of white face paint and broad slapstick for the “tramp” look popular among Depression-era derelicts. One of his signature routines involved attempting to sweep up after circus acts, and failing in spite of himself—to the delight and empathy of the audience.

7. December 10: Jane Addams Day

December 10 is the day that the Nobel Prize Award Ceremonies have been held every year since 1901. Consequently, there are a lot of firsts that fall on this date, like the first American woman to be honored. That would be Jane Addams, founder of our current social work industry and prominent women's suffrage leader. On the anniversary of that award, given in 1931, we remember her life and work.

8. December 12: Poinsettia Day

Potted poinsettia plant
alicjane/iStock via Getty Images

This day doesn't just celebrate the festive flower—it also marks the death of its namesake, Joel Roberts Poinsett. The botanist (and first U.S. Ambassador to Mexico) brought clippings of Euphorbia pulcherrima back to the States from southern Mexico, and grew the plant at his South Carolina home.

9. December 12: Festival of Unmentionable Thoughts

We would love to tell you about the origin of this fest or how one goes about celebrating it, but, well, common decency prevents us.

10. December 13: Official Lost And Found Day

Visit a thrift store, see if you can find that book you’ve misplaced, or invest in a memory-boosting regime so you’ll be losing things less frequently.

11. December 13: National Day Of The Horse

A horse running
Callipso/iStock via Getty Images

In 2004, the Senate signed legislation to officially make the second Saturday of December the National Day of the Horse. We really shouldn’t have to explain the reason horses need to be celebrated—just look at them!

12. December 13: National Cocoa Day

The weather outside is starting to get frightful, but what better cure for the temperature blues than a nice cup of hot cocoa? A down coat or a wool hat simply can’t compete in the taste department.

13. December 13: National Salesperson Day

Because you might not always want their help, but will absolutely be needing it this holiday season.

14. December 14: Monkey Day

A group of rhesus macaques
Michael Warren/iStock via Getty Images

Officially, Monkey Day is an “annual celebration of all things simian, a festival of primates, a chance to scream like a monkey and throw feces at whomever you choose.” The origins of the holiday are unknown, though it has been observed since at least 2003.

15. December 14: Gingerbread Decorating Day

Whether you’re a craftsman or an eater, today is the day for you.

16. December 15: Cat Herders Day

Technically this day is for all those who work jobs that could be described as like trying to herd cats, but it’s also probably acceptable to celebrate by trying to wrangle a cute feline.

17. December 16: Barbie And Barney Backlash Day

Barbie doll on a pink background
ivanastar/iStock via Getty Images

Doesn’t seem like a coincidence that this holiday occurs in December: It’s the one day a year when you can tell your kids that Barbie and Barney don’t exist.

18. December 17: Wright Brothers Day

Made an official holiday in 1963 by Presidential Proclamation, this holiday marks the day in 1903 when Orville and Wilbur Wright achieved the first ever successful (documented) controlled airplane flight near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

19. December 20: Underdog Day

Observed annually on the third Friday of December since 1976, this is a reminder to honor the little guy. We’re always rooting for them, but there’s a holiday to celebrate, too.

20. December 21: Humbug Day

Black bah humbug holiday hat
Michael Burrell/iStock via Getty Images

Get out all your bahs and scowls and growls now: no one will tolerate them come Christmas.

21. December 21: Phileas Fogg Win A Wager Day

In Jules Verne's 1873 classic novel Around the World in 80 Days, Phileas Fogg bets that he can travel the entire globe, between 8:45 p.m. on October 2, and 8:45 p.m. on December 21. Keep an eye out for him on this day.

22. December 22: Forefathers’ Day

On December 21, 1620 (it was a Monday) the Pilgrims aboard the Mayflower landed in Plymouth, Massachusetts, and since that basically kick-started our country's history since then, we celebrate it.

23. December 23: Festivus!

A photo of aluminum poles
SafakOguz/iStock via Getty Images

For those who shy away from the more traditional December holidays, there’s always Festivus for the rest of us. Created by a Seinfeld writer's father and popularized by Frank Costanza, this secular holiday that involves gathering around an aluminum pole and airing your grievances has continued to gain a following since its introduction in 1997. If you haven’t seen the episode, there’s an entire website that spells out how to celebrate Festivus from start to finish. (Test your Festivus knowledge with this quiz.)

24. December 25: A’phabet Day

A pun on noel, this offbeat ce'ebration is designed to high'ight the arbitrary nature of many of the year's si''ier ho'idays. Whi'e you're unwrapping presents and eating your Christmas feast, 'eave a'' the "L"s out of written and spoken communication for a festive activity that wi'' sure'y infuriate your 'oved ones.

25. December 26: National Whiners Day

Get it all out, whiners. Today is your day.

26. December 29: Tick Tock Day

Alarm clock against a wall.
iStock via Getty Images

In case you needed another reminder of the inevitable passage of time and/or an occasion to reevaluate how those 2019 resolutions are going!

27. December 31: No Interruptions Day

Before you head off into the New Year's Eve night in search of champagne and midnight kisses, you have to get through the very last business day of the year. Make it a good one with intense focus and no interruptions.

28. December 31: Make Up Your Mind Day

Tomorrow’s a new year! Time to fight that indecisiveness and make a decision—maybe even a resolution, if you will.

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