Archaeologists Excavate the Field Where Woodstock Was Held

Hulton Archive/Getty Images
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Over 400,000 people attended the original Woodstock music festival in New York's Catskill Mountains. If any of the concertgoers left something behind—say, lost jewelry or discarded pinback buttons—it stood a chance of being unearthed by researchers nearly five decades later.

That's because archaeologists from New York's Binghamton University recently excavated the site of the 1969 concert in hopes of mapping out where some of the infamous events of Woodstock went down, the Los Angeles Times reports. The nondescript hillside in the small town of Bethel once served as a stage for some of the greatest names in rock and roll history, from Jimi Hendrix to Janis Joplin to The Who.

Woodstock lasted only three days in 1969, but its legacy has endured. Last year, the site—otherwise known as the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts—was added to the National Register of Historic Places. A museum on the property hosts public walking tours of the former festival grounds, but photographs from the period aren't the most accurate indicator of where exactly the stage was located, archaeologists say. Their research will be used to help the museum plan more precise “interpretive walking routes” for Woodstock's 50th anniversary next year.

Project director Josh Anderson told the Los Angeles Times their excavation will serve as a "reference point." "People can stand on that and look up at the hill and say, 'Oh, this is where the performers were. Jimi Hendrix stood here and played his guitar at 8:30 in the morning,'" Anderson said. 

As far as artifacts go, the team of archaeologists probably won't be selling any of their finds to a museum or auction house. They didn't dig up much, save for a few pull tabs from aluminum cans (probably of the alcoholic variety) and shards of broken glass bottles. For more insight into what this historic concert was like, you'll want to head to the Bethel Woods museum, which offers a permanent collection of photos, videos, and memorabilia from the period.

[h/t Los Angeles Times]

Wednesday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Computer Monitors, Plant-Based Protein Powder, and Blu-ray Sets

Amazon
Amazon
As a recurring feature, our team combs the web and shares some amazing Amazon deals we’ve turned up. Here’s what caught our eye today, December 2. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers, including Amazon, and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Good luck deal hunting!

Archaeologists Discover the Jousting Yard Where Henry VIII Had His Historic Accident

National Trust, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
National Trust, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Henry VIII may have never earned his reputation as an ill-mannered tyrant if it weren't for injuries he sustained at age 44. Now, as Live Science reports, archaeologists have uncovered the infamous jousting yard where that history-changing accident took place.

Prior to the beheading of Anne Boleyn—his second of six wives—King Henry VIII was regarded as a kind, gregarious leader by those who knew him. The point where descriptions of him changed their tone coincided with a fall he took on January 24, 1536.

While jousting at Greenwich Palace, Henry was tossed from his armored horse and further injured when his steed fell on top of him. The incident caused him to lose consciousness for two hours and nearly cost him his life.

Though it was never diagnosed, some experts believe Henry VIII sustained a brain injury that day that altered his personality. From that point on, he was characterized as irritable and cruel. He was in constant pain from migraines and an ulcerated leg, which could also explain the mood shift. The (sometimes violent) dissolution of most of his marriages occurred post-accident.

Ruins of the jousting yard, or tiltyard, where that fateful incident took place are located 5.5 feet beneath the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, the former site of Greenwich Palace. After falling into disrepair, the palace was demolished by Charles II, and the exact location of the tiltyard was forgotten. A team of archaeologists led by Simon Withers of the University of Greenwich used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to locate the remnants buried beneath the ground earlier this year.

The giveaways were the footprints of two octagonal towers. The archaeologists say these were likely the foundations of the bleacher-like viewing stands where spectators watched jousting matches. That would place the historic tiltyard about 330 feet east of where it was originally thought to be situated.

The radar scans provided a peek at what lies beneath the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, but to learn more, the archaeologists will need to get their hands dirty. Their next step will be digging up the site to get a better look at the ruins.

[h/t Live Science]