8 Science-Backed Tips to Keep Your Feet From Burning on Hot Sand

iStock
iStock

With temperatures hitting record highs this summer, beaches—and their promise of cool ocean dips—beckon. But to reach the waves, it's likely you'll first have to cross an expanse of foot-scalding sand. Sand is made up of decomposed rock—quartz, mostly, but also calcite, feldspar, gypsum, or basalt, sometimes with a smattering of shell, coral, or fish poop tossed in—and according to Paul Jarvis, a geologist and volcanologist at the University of Geneva, it receives solar energy via the process of radiation. The composition of sand causes it to heat up as the day progresses and to retain that heat, reaching temperatures as high as 140°F—sufficient to inflict third-degree burns. Here are tips for protecting your soles from this painful outcome.

1. WEAR THE RIGHT KIND OF SHOES.

This seems obvious, but the level of protection you get depends on the kind of shoe you're wearing. Materials such as plastic and rubber (what many soles are made of), foam resin (the stuff of Crocs), and the neoprene base of the Sand Socks that many beach volleyball players swear by provide a barrier between skin and sand. This helps cut down on conduction—the transfer of heat from the warmer surface of the sandy beach to the cooler surfaces of your feet. As a result, your feet are protected (at least temporarily) from blistering. And though they're likely the first shoes you picture when you think of the beach, flip-flops and other open shoes should be avoided on especially scorching days, because they let the hot sand in.

2. MAKE A PATH USING A COUPLE OF BEACH TOWELS.

Forgot your shoes in the car? You can protect your feet by rolling out a couple of towels to step on, repeating the process until you reach your coveted beach spot. The cotton of your towel is better at quelling heat transfer to your feet than the rubber soles of your shoes are due to what scientists call a lower thermal conductivity—“the measure of how fast heat can be conducted through the material,” Jarvis tells Mental Floss. However, your towel is also thinner than your shoe bottoms, and heat conducts faster through thin objects. In other words, you’ll have to hurry if you want to keep your feet cool.

3. RUN FAST …

The less time the soles of your feet spend touching the sand, the less time there is for conduction. But sprinting is probably a technique best reserved for covering short distances or for morning beach visits, before the sand has had a chance to soak up the solar rays for several hours and achieve maximum temperature. Because no matter how fast you run, conduction is still happening, and after some strides, your feet will eventually begin to feel the burn.

4. … OR BURROW YOUR FEET.

If you're loaded down with a cooler and tote bags, try a technique favored by professional beach volleyball players: Burrowing your tootsies as you walk, which puts your feet in contact with the much cooler sand beneath the surface. Because there are large gaps between grains of sand, it's “unable to efficiently transmit heat … through the sand bed to [its] deeper levels,” Jarvis says. So dig in a few inches. This way of “walking” is actually more of a slow shuffle, but it'll get you to your destination sans burns.

5. WET THE SAND …

It takes five times as much solar energy to heat water 1°C (33.8°F) as it does to heat sand by the same amount (what's technically known as heat capacity). So “adding just a small amount of water to the sand can dramatically increase the amount of heat the sand surface needs to receive before it gets hot,” Jarvis says. You can replicate the effect by toting a bucket of water and tossing its contents under your feet little by little as you go. While not the easiest method, it could be a solution for when you're already near the water and have to, say, run to the restroom or buy a snack. Just grab one of the kids' sand-castle buckets. Wet sand is also a lot less arduous to walk and run on than dry sand.

6. … OR YOUR FEET.

American pro beach volleyball player Sara Hughes has a go-to sand strategy: “To cool down, I personally like to put water on my feet,” she told USA Volleyball's blog. According to Jarvis, because water has a higher heat capacity than human skin, having wet—and therefore colder—feet means "you can be exposed to the beach for longer before your skin reaches a temperature at which it will burn.” Obviously, this is a highly temporary solution, since your feet will quickly dry. So bring the bucket for this tactic too: You might have to dip your feet into the water several times before reaching your ultimate destination.

7. FOLLOW THE SHADE.

Since it doesn’t take a lot of energy to change the temperature of sand, areas in shadow will feel noticeably cooler to the touch. It's easier to find those spots early in the morning or at the onset of evening, when the Sun is at an angle to the beach; the rest of the day, keep an eye out for shadowed spots made by the lifeguard chair, beach umbrellas, or palm trees to give your feet relief.

8. FIND A LIGHT-COLORED BEACH.

Should you opt to go shoe-less, choose your sand wisely. The heat capacity of the sand on any beach you visit is dependent on what minerals it’s comprised of—a challenge to know unless you do your own scientific studies, beach by beach. However, a general rule of thumb is that hotter beaches come with darker sands—and the opposite is also true. “Light-colored sand reflects, as opposed to absorbs, a significant proportion of the Sun’s radiation,” Jarvis says. “Dark sand, such as that originating from volcanic rocks [like basalt], is much more heat absorbent, meaning it will heat up quicker and therefore, potentially become much hotter.”

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

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The Psychological Tricks Disney Parks Use to Make Long Wait Times More Bearable

© Jorge Royan, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0
© Jorge Royan, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

No one goes to Disneyland or Disney World to spend the day waiting in line, but when a queue is well-designed, waiting can be part of the experience. Disney knows this better than anyone, and the parks' Imagineers have developed several tricks over the years to make long wait times as painless as possible.

According to Popular Science, hacking the layout of the line itself is a simple way to influence the rider's perspective. When a queue consists of 200 people zig-zagging around ropes in a large, open room, it's easy for waiting guests to feel overwhelmed. This design allows riders to see exactly how many people are in line in front of them—which isn't necessarily a good thing when the line is long.

Imagineers prevent this by keeping riders in the dark when they enter the queue. In Space Mountain, for example, walls are built around the twisting path, so riders have no idea how much farther they have to go until they're deeper into the building. This stops people from giving up when they first get in line.

Another example of deception ride designers use is the "Machiavellian twist." If you've ever been pleasantly surprised by a line that moved faster than you expected, that was intentional. The signs listing wait times at the beginning of ride queues purposefully inflate the numbers. That way, when a wait that was supposed to be 120 minutes goes by in 90, you feel like you have more time than you did before.

The final trick is something Disney parks are famous for: By incorporating the same level of production design found on the ride into the queue, Imagineers make waiting in line an engaging experience that has entertainment value of its own. The Tower of Terror queue in Disney World, which is modeled after a decrepit 1930s hotel lobby down to the cobwebs and the abandoned coffee cups, feels like it could be a movie set. Some ride lines even use special effects. While waiting to ride Star Wars: Ride of the Resistance in Galaxy's Edge, guests get to watch holograms and animatronics that set up the story of the ride. This strategy exploits the so-called dual-task paradigm, which makes the line feel as if it's going by faster by giving riders mental stimulation as they wait.

Tricky ride design is just one of Disney's secrets. Here are more behind-the-scenes facts about the beloved theme parks.

[h/t Popular Science]