If You're a Woman Having a Heart Attack, You'll Want a Female ER Doctor

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iStock

Women who suffer heart attacks may face a 12 percent greater risk of dying if their care is entrusted to a male doctor, according to a new study reported by Scientific American.

Researchers think one factor in this disparity is the shortage of female physicians, who make up only a quarter of emergency room doctors in the U.S. For the study, published in the journal PNAS, the researchers analyzed a Florida Agency for Health Care Administration database that contained 19 years of records on heart attack cases from nearly every emergency room in the state.

They analyzed the statistical relationship between rates of death and four different physician-patient combinations: male doctors treating men or women, and female doctors treating men or women. The statistics were “indistinguishable except for male doctor–female patient,” the study’s co-author, Brad Greenwood, tells Scientific American.

They found that one out of every 66 women who has a heart attack will die in the emergency room if she is treated by a male doctor instead of a female one.

Although heart disease is the main cause of death in both men and women in the U.S., it’s often wrongly perceived as being a male disease, as well as an ailment that only affects the elderly. However, the disease kills about 15,000 women under the age of 55 each year.

Men are also more likely to recover from it. According to American Heart Association statistics from 2016, 36 percent of men die within five years of a heart attack, compared to 47 percent of women.

Other research has yielded similar findings. A study published in February found that doctors are more likely to ignore signs of a heart attack when they’re reported by young female patients as opposed to young male patients. This could be because the symptoms tend to manifest differently in women than they do in men, with female heart attack patients sometimes complaining of neck and back pains, fatigue, and nausea; because most studies have focused on men, their symptoms are seen as the standard ones.

As a result, many women wait before seeking help. “I can’t tell you how many women I’ve seen who say they felt something and wondered if it was a heart attack,” Harmony Reynolds, a cardiologist who specializes in women’s heart health, told the New York Post in February. “That inkling is there, but for some reason it doesn’t convert into action.”

For more information about the symptoms of heart attacks in women, visit the Go Red for Women website.

[h/t Scientific American]

This Gorgeous Vintage Edition of Clue Sets the Perfect Mood for a Murder Mystery

WS Game Company
WS Game Company

Everyone should have a few good board games lying around the house for official game nights with family and friends and to kill some time on the occasional rainy day. But if your collection leaves a lot to be desired, you can class-up your selection with this great deal on the Vintage Bookshelf Edition of Clue for $40.

A brief history of Clue

'Clue' Vintage Bookshelf Edition.
WS Game Company.

Originally titled Murder!, Clue was created by a musician named Anthony Pratt in Birmingham, England, in 1943, and he filed a patent for it in 1944. He sold the game to Waddington's in the UK a few years later, and they changed the name to Cluedo in 1949 (that name was a mix between the words clue and Ludo, which was a 19th-century game.) That same year, the game was licensed to Parker Brothers in the United States, where it was published as Clue. Since then, there have been numerous special editions and spinoffs of the original game, not to mention books and a television series based on it. Most notably, though, was the cult classic 1985 film Clue, which featured Eileen Brennan, Tim Curry, Madeline Kahn, Christopher Lloyd, Michael McKean, Martin Mull, and Lesley Ann Warren.

As you probably know, every game of Clue begins with the revelation of a murder. The object of the game is to be the first person to deduce who did it, with what weapon, and where. To achieve that end, each player assumes the role of one of the suspects and moves strategically around the board collecting clues.

With its emphasis on logic and critical thinking—in addition to some old-fashioned luck—Clue is a masterpiece that has stood the test of time and evolved with each decade, with special versions of the game hitting shelves recently based on The Office, Rick and Morty, and Star Wars.

Clue Vintage Bookshelf Edition

'Clue' Vintage Library Edition.
WS Game Company

The Vintage Bookshelf Edition of Clue is the work of the WS Game Company, a licensee of Hasbro, and all the design elements are inspired by the aesthetic of the 1949 original. The game features a vintage-looking game board, cards, wood movers, die-cast weapons, six pencils, an ivory-colored die, an envelope, and a pad of “detective notes.” And, of course, everything folds up and stores inside a beautiful cloth-bound book box that you can store right on the shelf in your living room.

Clue Vintage Bookshelf Edition is a limited-release item, and right now you can get it for $40.

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How to Make Wearing a Face Mask More Comfortable During the Warm, Sweaty Summer Months

Cloth face masks can make for a sweaty summer.
Cloth face masks can make for a sweaty summer.
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As the coronavirus pandemic continues to challenge the world’s population to rethink everyday behaviors, it seems likely people will continue to practice both social distancing and the use of a cloth face mask throughout the summer. (Cloth masks can’t stop infectious particles from entering the nose and mouth, but they can reduce the spread of respiratory droplets by wearers.)

Once tolerable, these masks might grow to be uncomfortable as temperatures rise and the fabric begins to trap heat. Fortunately, there are some steps you can take to minimize discomfort.

According to health experts who spoke to writer Nick Vadala of The Philadelphia Inquirer, the best strategy for a heat-friendly face mask is to opt for a 100 percent cotton fabric. Polyester and other synthetic materials can trap heat, causing wearers to build up sweat and moisture around their face quickly.

You’ll want to avoid any kind of filter, which are also synthetic and make breathing more difficult.

Snug masks can also be harder to tolerate when it’s warm out. To adjust the fit, it’s better to use a mask that has ties rather than elastic straps, which can irritate the ears.

The biggest adjustment wearers may have to make in adhering to mask recommendations in the summer is to carry more than one. As masks get damp from sweat, they’ll need to be switched out for a dry one. You’ll want to be sure to do that only after washing or sanitizing your hands and making the switch away from other people.

Despite your best efforts, skin irritation might persist. It’s a good idea to use moisturizer to heal skin affected by trapped heat and moisture.

[h/t The Philadelphia Inquirer]