The Most Profitable Industry in Each State

More than half of the states in the U.S. are driven by three leading industries: machinery, aerospace, and mineral resources. These findings, shown on a map created by HowMuch (click the link to zoom in), paint a picture of the products and technologies that fuel the country’s economic growth.

And according to HowMuch, a cost information website, the findings are “unnerving.”

“We read all the time about how diversification is the best guard against risk. And based on our map, the US economy is diverse in some regions but not very diverse in others,” HowMuch wrote in a post, noting that 27 states are led by the three aforementioned industries.

“That means that when certain segments undergo technological disruption or economic downturns, it can disproportionately impact sections of the country in ways people don’t expect.”

HowMuch used recent findings from GoBankingRates, which pulled 2017 data from the U.S. Census Bureau data, to create its map. Some of the findings were more predictable, like the fact that states in the Motor City region surrounding Detroit—Michigan, Ohio, and Indiana—get their biggest economic boost from car manufacturing. Others, like Kansas’s $2.6 billion aerospace industry, are perhaps more unexpected.

There is some overlap between the most lucrative industry in each state and the biggest export in each state, which was also mapped out by HowMuch. However, there are a few notable differences. At $20 billion, the most profitable industry in Nevada, for instance, is accommodation and food services (think Las Vegas), while its largest export is gold ($6.3 million).

This Outdoor Lantern Will Keep Mosquitoes Away—No Bug Spray Necessary

Thermacell, Amazon
Thermacell, Amazon

With summer comes outdoor activities, and with those activities come mosquito bites. If you're one of the unlucky people who seem to attract the insects, you may be tempted to lock yourself inside for the rest of the season. But you don't have to choose between comfort and having a cocktail on the porch, because this lamp from Thermacell ($25) keeps outdoor spaces mosquito-free without the mess of bug spray.

The device looks like an ordinary lantern you would display on a patio, but it works like bug repellent. When it's turned on, a fuel cartridge in the center provides the heat needed to activate a repellent mat on top of the lamp. Once activated, the repellent in the mat creates a 15-by-15-foot bubble of protection that repels any mosquitos nearby, making it a great option for camping trips, days by the pool, and backyard barbecues.

Mosquito repellent lantern.

Unlike some other mosquito repellents, this lantern is clean, safe, and scent-free. It also provides light like a real lamp, so you can keep pests away without ruining your backyard's ambience.

The Thermacell mosquito repellent lantern is now available on Amazon. If you've already suffered your first mosquito bites of the summer, here's some insight into why that itch can be so excruciating.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

The Motto of Each U.S. State, Mapped

Each state has its own motto.
Each state has its own motto.
choness/iStock via Getty Images

Unless you pay a lot of attention to license plates, you’re probably not able to easily recall your state’s motto. Texas, California, New York, and other states sport distinctive phrases that help characterize their territory. All 50 U.S. states have one, spread across multiple languages including English, Latin, Spanish, and more.

Financial services resource CashNetUSA recently assembled a map featuring all of America's state mottos, and it makes for some intriguing exploration.

Courtesy of: CashNetUSA

Many of these states have compelling stories behind their choice of a motto. In California, “Eureka!” (Greek for “I’ve found it!”) stems from the story of Archimedes realizing he could determine the purity of gold. He ran through the streets—naked—shouting “Eureka!” The phrase was later used in the original design of the state seal in 1849 at the height of the Gold Rush.

In Wyoming, “Equal Rights” refers to the state’s progressive attitude toward women's rights, having guaranteed them the right to vote, serve on juries, and hold public office beginning in 1869.

The most metal of these phrases, New Hampshire’s “Live Free or Die,” came from General John Stark in 1809. He wrote a toast for a military event he couldn’t attend that read in part: “Live free or die; death is not the worst of evils.”