The Long-Buried 16th-Century Theater Where Shakespeare's Earliest Plays Were Performed Will Reopen

Archaeologists on site at The Theatre during the 2008 excavation
Archaeologists on site at The Theatre during the 2008 excavation
Museum of London Archaeology

Before Shakespeare performed his plays at the famous Globe theater, he graced the stage of another London-based playhouse. It was known simply as The Theatre, and Shakespeare staged some of his most famous plays there (including Romeo and Juliet). Plans are now underway to publicly unveil the site for the first time in over 400 years, Smithsonian reports.

The remains of the 16th-century playhouse were discovered in 2008 during an excavation. Now, the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) is working to turn the site into a public exhibition.

Floor plan of the exhibition
A floor plan of the exhibition, including The Theatre's footprint
Nissen Richards Studio

A reconstructed view of The Theatre
A reconstructed view of what The Theatre once looked like
David Toon, Lee Sands, and Museum of London Archaeology

Visitors will have the chance to view the remains of The Theatre through a window inside the exhibition, dubbed The Box Office. Other artifacts unearthed during the excavation will also be on view, as well as items loaned from institutions across London that highlight the history and culture of Elizabethan theater. The exhibition is expected to open in late 2019.

In the meantime, the process continues to be a learning experience for archaeologists. Just last week, MOLA announced new findings that showed that actor James Burbage, who designed the polygonal, three-tiered Theatre, also created a space surrounding the theater where visitors could relax during long performances. Shakespearean plays often lasted over four hours, and Burbage's complex was an area where guests could chat and stretch their legs.

"Shakespearean playhouses were melting pots of society, and whilst the interior seating arrangements reflected the everyday class divides, theatregoers from across the social spectrum gathered outside to eat and drink and mingle before a performance," MOLA said in a statement. "The recent archaeological excavations are exploring small pockets of these outside areas, and it is hoped that this ongoing research will reveal new insight and artifacts that will eventually be displayed in the exhibition."

[h/t Smithsonian]

26 Fascinating Facts About Fossils

Mental Floss via YouTube
Mental Floss via YouTube

If you’ve never visited the Big Bone Room, you’re in luck. Check out our visit to New York City's American Museum of Natural History for a rundown on fossils, which provide invaluable insight into our understanding of history and its once-living occupants.

In this edition of "The List Show," editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy explains the ins and outs of excavation, fossil follies (extinct giants were a big miss), and the terrorizing prospect of a 3-foot-tall parrot.

For more episodes like this one, be sure to subscribe here!

2000-Year-Old Roman Tweezers and Metal Ear Swab Discovered in UK

Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

The ancient Romans took hygiene seriously. They pioneered indoor plumbing, deodorant, and the practice of bathing daily. A recent discovery made at a bridge construction site in the UK reinforces just how committed to cleanliness the Roman civilization was. As Geek.com reports, workers unearthed an ear cleaner and a pair of tweezers thought to date back 2000 years to the Roman Empire.

The artifacts were dug up by the Ebbsfleet Development Corporation at the location of the new Springhead Bridge in Ebbsfleet Garden City, a development in Kent. One small tool appears to be designed for pinching and plucking small items just like modern-day tweezers. The other object is thought to have been built for cleaning ears—but instead of cotton, the "swab" is made entirely of metal. They're thought to date back thousands of years, but scientific analysis will need to be done to determine the exact age.

Grooming items weren't the only artifacts uncovered at the site. Workers also found a piece of timber believed to have been meant for an ancient structure. The Ebbsfleet River, where the new bridge is being built, was once a shipping hub and a Roman settlement called Vagniacis. Historical finds are so common in the area that the Ebbsfleet Development Corporation employs full-time archaeologists.

The personal hygiene tools have been removed from the archaeological site by experts who will study them to learn more about their origins. The fate of the artifacts is unclear, but the construction company behind the discovery hopes they can remain in the same city where they were found.

[h/t Geek.com]

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