This Creepy Finger Plugs Into Your Phone and Drags the Device to You

Courtesy of Marc Teyssier
Courtesy of Marc Teyssier

A team of researchers has finally answered the question on everyone’s mind: "What if mobile devices had a robotic limb?" Well, the future is here, and a new invention spotted by Tech Radar lets you plug a faux finger into your phone.

Like something out of The Addams Family, the MobiLimb uses sensors and embedded electronics to scoot across a surface and bring you your phone. The finger-like "skin" is made from the same type of silicone that's used in Hollywood to make masks and realistic prosthetics. It's creepy, sure, but never again will you be forced to get off the couch to grab your phone when it's on the opposite end of the coffee table. So there's that.

The robotic digit is the invention of four researchers from France, including human-computer interaction researcher Marc Teyssier. Their findings—and hopefully a reasonable explanation for inventing this terrifying thing—will be presented this month at the 2018 User Interface Software and Technology Symposium in Berlin, Germany.

With the MobiLimb, your phone will no longer be boring, motionless, and passive. It taps on the table when you get a notification, and if you happen to receive a smiley face emoji while holding your phone, the robotic finger softly strokes your hand or inner wrist. Why? Well, we're not totally sure. According to researchers, the device "reacts expressively to users' actions to foster curiosity and engagement" and also "provides rich haptic feedback such as strokes, pats, and other tactile stimuli on the hand or the wrist to convey emotions during mediated multimodal communications." In other words, it's meant to make your phone more human. Yikes.

If the realistic rubber finger is too grotesque for you, you can opt instead for a robot-like one instead. Another version, clad in faux fur, is designed to resemble a wagging tail—because at this point, nothing is really surprising anymore. You can see the MobiLimb in action in the video below.

Of course, the MobiLimb has less disturbing applications, as well. It can be used as a joystick, or as a stand to prop up your phone while you watch cute cat videos. Sadly, it doesn't appear to be for sale at the moment, so all plans to freak out your friends with it will have to be put on hold.

[h/t Tech Radar]

In 1995, You Could Smell Like Kermit the Frog

Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images
Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

The mid-'90s were a great time for Kermit the Frog. In 1996 alone, he led the Tournament of Roses Parade, was the face of the 40-year-old Muppet brand, and had both a movie (Muppet Treasure Island) and a television show (Muppets Live!) to promote. His career could not have been hotter, so Kermit did what any multifaceted, single-person empire does while sitting atop his or her celebrity throne: he released a fragrance. Amphibia, produced by Jim Henson Productions, was dripping with froggy sex appeal. The unisex perfume—its slogan was "pour homme, femme, et frog"—had a clean, citrusy smell with a hint of moss to conjure up memories of the swamp. Offered exclusively at Bloomingdale's in Manhattan, it sold for $18.50 (or $32.50 for those who wanted a gift box and T-shirt).

There’s no trace of a commercial for the perfume—which is a shame, since Amphibia is a word that begs to be whispered—but a print ad and photos of the packaging still live online. The six-pack and strategically-placed towel are an apt parody ... and also deeply unsettling.

Amphibia was the most-sold fragrance at the Manhattan Bloomingdale's in the 1995 Christmas season. "Kids are buying it, grown-ups are buying it, and frogs are really hot," pitchman Max Almenas told The New York Times.

It was a hit past the Christmas season, too: The eau de Muppet was cheekily reviewed by Mary Roach—who would go on to write Stiff and Packing for Mars—in a 1996 issue of TV Guide. "I wore Amphibia on my third date ... he said he found me riveting which I heard as ribbitting, as in 'ribbit, ribbit,' and I got all defensive," she wrote. "He assured me I didn't smell like a swamp ... I stuck my tongue out at him, to which he responded that it was the wrong time of year for flies, and besides, the food would be arriving shortly."

Not to be outdone, Miss Piggy also released a fragrance a few years later. It was, naturally, called Moi.

23 Weird Laws You Might Have Broken

Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy hosts "The List Show."
Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy hosts "The List Show."
Mental Floss via YouTube

If you've ever played a game of bingo in North Carolina, you may have been a party to a crime without even knowing it. And if you've ever eavesdropped on a neighbor in Oklahoma and shared any of that juicy gossip, you might just want to go ahead and turn yourself into the police.

From coast to coast, America is full of bizarre laws that you've probably broken at one time or another. Join Mental Floss editor-in-chief Erin McCarthy as she digs into the history of 23 of the strangest of them—like why you can't eat fried chicken with a knife and fork in Gainesville, Georgia. You can watch the full episode below.

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