10 Revolutionary Facts About Poldark

Courtesy of Mammoth Screen for BBC and MASTERPIECE
Courtesy of Mammoth Screen for BBC and MASTERPIECE

The fall weather brings with it a lot of cozy activities: Apple picking, pumpkin carving—and curling up on chilly nights with a comfy blanket, a steaming cup of tea, and a good British period drama. If you’re a fan of that last activity, it probably means you’ve been spending your Sunday evenings watching Poldark, which is ready to return to its coveted Sunday-at-9 p.m. slot on PBS’s long-running Masterpiece program for its fifth and final season.

Poldark is story of one Ross Poldark (Aidan Turner): an 18th-century gentleman-turned-social-justice-warrior juggling a love triangle, a gig as a member of Parliament, and a ripped set of abs. Here are 10 things you might not have known about the breathtaking BBC series.

1. Poldark is based on a series of books by British author Winston Graham.

Jack Farthing as George Warleggan, Heida Reed as Elizabeth, Aidan Turner as Ross Poldark, Eleanor Tomlinson as Demelza, Luke Norris as Dr. Dwight Enys and Gabriella Wilde as Caroline Penvenan
Courtesy of Robert Viglasky, Mammoth Screen for BBC and MASTERPIECE

Between 1945 and 2002, Winston Graham penned a total of 12 novels about Ross Poldark and his cherished community in the southwest of England. Although the Manchester-born writer also had a prolific portfolio of non-Poldark published works, it was the saga of Cap’n Ross that brought him fame and fortune. The final book in the series, Bella Poldark, was published in 2002—just a year before the author’s death.

2. This is the second TV adaptation of Poldark.

Forty years before Aidan Turner’s brooding portrayal of Ross Poldark resulted in a barrage of online marriage proposals, fans across the globe were swooning over the BBC’s first television adaptation of the Cornwall-set drama. The 1975 version of Poldark—which was also broadcast in the U.S. on Masterpiece Theatrestarred Robin Ellis as Ross and the late Angharad Rees as Demelza.

Although, in recent years, Ellis has turned his attention to his second career as a cookbook author, he occasionally cameos on the new Poldark as one of Ross’s adversaries: the irascible Reverend Halse.

Though the original Poldark was a hit, famed Masterpiece Theatre host Alistair Cooke hated it. “I was bored stiff," Cooke said in 1982, when asked about his least favorite program featured on the long-running series. "It seemed to be a bunch of cardboard figures going through the motions of love and hate.”

3. Aidan Turner is a former amateur ballroom dancer.

Before he was melting hearts with his luscious brown locks and chiseled pectorals, the Poldark star spent a decade competing in amateur ballroom dancing competitions, representing his home country of Ireland. In 2018, while appearing on The Graham Norton Show, Turner sheepishly downplayed his skills as a teenage tango expert, claiming he wasn’t disciplined enough to “go pro.”

Fortunately for fans who are craving a taste of Turner’s not-so-hidden talent, there is the above behind-the-scenes video from the Poldark set, in which Turner—decked out in Ross’s 1700s finery—can be seen cutting a rug to the decidedly 20th-century track “Mas Que Nada.

4. Tourism in Cornwall spiked following Poldark's success.

Whenever location is considered a character in a film or TV show, it’s inevitable that the tour buses will start rolling in. It’s no different for Poldark, which shoots in the southwest England county of Cornwall, and regularly enhances its narrative with sweeping vistas of its rugged coastline.

According to The Guardian, there was an uptick in Cornwall’s visitor numbers after the show’s first season, with one-fifth of the people who took part in a tourism survey admitting that Poldark was the reason behind their trip to the area. Even the official Cornwall tourist board has jumped on the Poldark bandwagon.

5. Two Poldark actresses appeared in iconic films from the 1980s.

Ever hear of a couple of little films called Return of the Jedi and Highlander (1986)? While most of the younger actresses featured in Poldark weren’t even born yet when those movies were in theaters, their senior colleagues were upgrading their resumes with parts in some of the most memorable movies of the '80s. Caroline Blakiston, best known to Poldark fans as the feisty family matriarch Aunt Agatha, appeared as Mon Mothma in 1983’s Jedi. Beatie Edney, who plays Ross and Demelza’s curmudgeonly maid, Prudie, broke hearts in 1986’s Highlander as Heather MacLeod, the Scottish lass who succumbed to old age in her immortal husband’s arms.

6. Several of Poldark's characters are portrayed by non-Brits.

This is hardly a new thing: A Welsh guy played a Russian pretending to be an American on The Americans, after all. But it still can be shocking to learn that Poldark employed overseas talent considering its distinctively English pedigree (then again, that just goes to show the actors’s skill level).

As mentioned earlier, the man who embodies Ross Poldark, the epitome of British land-owning gentry, Aidan Turner, is Irish. Adding to the series’ international cast is the Connecticut-born Kyle Soller, who played Francis Poldark, Ross’s cousin and romantic rival in the first two seasons. The biggest surprise, however, has got to be Heida Reed, a.k.a. the genteel Elizabeth Warleggan, who is originally from Iceland; her given name is Heiða Rún Sigurðardóttir. But don’t expect to hear Reed sound terribly different from Elizabeth in interviews; she deliberately speaks with an English accent now.

7. Pulling off that Cornish accent is hard.

Accents are different all over, whether you’re from the north of England, like Eleanor Tomlinson, or Cornwall, like the fiery Demelza, her character on Poldark. So, Tomlinson, who was determined to get Demelza’s Cornish mannerisms right, adopted a distinctive technique to get the job done: Speaking with a clenched jaw.

“I learned about how [the Cornish people’s] jaws were a lot tighter because of the wind, and living so close to the sea, the salt makes you speak in a different way,” Tomlinson told The Telegraph in 2015. “They clench their jaw tightly so you get a completely different sound.” But even with two seasons playing Demelza under her belt, Tomlinson still found it impossible to slip into the character when prompted during a Masterpiece podcast in 2016: “It’s not something I can just immediately pick up,” she said. “I have to really work hard at it.”

8. Season 2 of Poldark featured a problematic sex scene.

In a scene that came from Warleggan, the fourth novel in the Poldark series, Ross angrily barges into Elizabeth’s bedchamber upon learning that she intends to marry his mortal enemy, George Warleggan. Although she tells him to leave and resists his forceful advances, Elizabeth eventually submits to Ross’s will—and appears to enjoy it. Their one night of passion resulted in Ross receiving a much-deserved decking courtesy of Demelza, and Elizabeth delivering a son, Valentine, less than nine months after her marriage to George.

This scene also resulted in a barrage of criticism toward Poldark, accusing the series of “prettifying” sexual assault and blurring the lines of consent. Andrew Graham, son of Winston Graham and a consultant on Poldark, defended the show’s portrayal of the scene, claiming “there is no ‘shock rape’ storyline in the novels,” explaining that “what then actually happens is not described but is left entirely to one’s imagination.”

9. The actor who plays the revolting Reverend Ossie Whitworth is far from revolting in real life.

Christian Brassington as Ossie Whitworth
Courtesy of Mammoth Screen for BBC and MASTERPIECE

One scroll through Christian Brassington’s Instagram is a double-take waiting to happen. The actor plays the villainous minister Ossie Whitworth on Poldark. But if you’re expecting pics of a rotund dude with a self-righteous gleam in his eye, you’ll have to make do with someone who looks like he walked off the cover of GQ instead. As Brassington recently revealed in a Masterpiece Instagram Story Q&A, he put on 40 pounds to play the loathsome Ossie.

10. The fifth season of Poldark will also be its last.

All good things must come to an end, including Poldark. Shortly before season four's U.S. premiere, it was announced that Poldark's fifth season would be its final season.

“In The Stranger from the Sea, Winston Graham made many references to developments that happened in the gap years," Poldark creator Debbie Horsfield, who has written every episode of the first four seasons, said in discussing the final season. "Much can also be inferred. There are, of course, also historical events and people of the time, both in Cornwall and in London. Series five will draw on all of these to follow the lives of the Poldarks, George Warleggan, the Enyses, and the Carnes in this intervening period."

This story has been updated for 2019.

This Smart Accessory Converts Your Instant Pot Into an Air Fryer

Amazon
Amazon

If you can make a recipe in a slow cooker, Dutch oven, or rice cooker, you can likely adapt it for an Instant Pot. Now, this all-in-one cooker can be converted into an air fryer with one handy accessory.

This Instant Pot air fryer lid—currently available on Amazon for $80—adds six new cooking functions to your 6-quart Instant Pot. You can select the air fry setting to get food hot and crispy fast, using as little as 2 tablespoons of oil. Other options include roast, bake, broil, dehydrate, and reheat.

Many dishes you would prepare in the oven or on the stovetop can be made in your Instant Pot when you switch out the lids. Chicken wings, French fries, and onion rings are just a few of the possibilities mentioned in the product description. And if you're used to frying being a hot, arduous process, this lid works without consuming a ton of energy or heating up your kitchen.

The lid comes with a multi-level air fry basket, a broiling and dehydrating tray, and a protective pad and storage cover. Check it out on Amazon.

For more clever ways to use your Instant Pot, take a look at these recipes.

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Q&A: Kristen Bell Celebrates Diversity In Her New Kid's Book, The World Needs More Purple People

Jim Spellman/Getty Images
Jim Spellman/Getty Images

Kristen Bell is one of those household names that brings to mind a seemingly endless list of outstanding performances in both TV and film. She is Veronica Mars. She is the very memorable Sarah Marshall. She's the voice of Gossip Girl. She just recently wrapped up her NBC series The Good Place. Your nieces and nephews likely know her as Princess Anna from the Frozen films. She also has one of the most uplifting and positive presences on social media.

Now, adding to her long list of accomplishments, Kristen Bell is the published author of a new children’s book called The World Needs More Purple People. Born out of seeing how cultural conversations were skewing more toward the things that divide us, the new picture book—which Bell co-authored with Benjamin Hart—encourages kids to see what unites us all as humans.

We spoke with Kristen Bell about what it means to be a purple person, her new animated series Central Park, and becoming a foster failure. We also put her knowledge of sloths to the test.

How did The World Needs More Purple People book come to be?

Basically my genius buddy, Ben Hart, and I were looking around and sort of seeing how our children were watching us debate healthily at the dinner table, which is fine. But it occurred to us that everything they were seeing was a disagreement. And that’s because that can be fun for adults, but it’s not a good basis for kids to start out on. We realized we were not really giving our kids a ton of examples of us, as adults, talking about the things that bring us together. So The World Needs More Purple People was born.

Book cover of Kristen Bell and Benjamin Hart's 'The World Needs More Purple People'
Random House via Amazon

We decided to create a roadmap of similarities to give kids a jumping off point of how to look for similarities ... [because] if you can see similarities, you’re more likely to walk through the world with an open mind. But if you walk into a conversation seeing only differences, your mind is going to think differently of that person’s opinion and you just never know when you’re going to hear an opinion that might enlighten you. So we wanted to give kids this roadmap to follow to basically say, “Here are some great features that no one can argue with. Have these features and you’ll have similarities with almost everyone on the planet.”

Part of the reason I love the book so much is because it encourages kids to ask questions, even if they're silly. What are some silly questions you’ve had to answer for your kids?

Oh my god. How much time do you have? Once she asked in rapid fire: Is Santa Claus real? Why is Earth? Who made dogs?

How do you even answer that?

It was too much; I had to walk away. Kids have a ton of questions, and as they get older and more verbal, the funny thing that happens is they get more insecure. So we wanted to encourage the question-asking, and also encourage the uniqueness of every child. Which is why Dan Wiseman, who did our illustrations, really captured this middle point between Ben and I. Ben is very sincere, and I am very quirky. And I feel like the illustrations were captured brilliantly because we also wanted a ton of diversity because that is what the book is about.

The book is about seeing different things and finding similarities. Each kid in the book looks a little bit different, but also a little bit the same. The message at the end of the book is with all these features that you can point out and recognize in other people—loving to laugh, working really hard, asking great questions ... also know that being a purple person means being uniquely you in the hopes that kids will recognize that purple people come in every color.

What was it like behind-the-scenes of writing a children’s book with two little girls at home? Were they tough critics?

Shockingly, no. They did not have much interest in the fact that I was writing a children’s book until there were pictures. Then they were like, “Oh now I get it.” But prior to that, when I’d run the ideas by them, they were not as interested. But I did read it to them. They gave me the two thumbs up. Ben has two kids as well, and all our kids are different ages. Once we got the thumbs up from the 5-year-old, the 7-year-old, the 8-year-old, and the 11-year-old, we thought, “OK, this is good to go.”

I hope that people, and kids especially, really do apply this as a concept. We would love to see this as a curriculum going into schools if they wanted to use it to ask: What happened today in your life that was purple? What could you do to make tomorrow more purple? Like as a concept of a way of living.

Weirdly, writing a children’s book was a way of getting to the adults. If it’s a children’s book, there is a high probability an adult is going to either be reading it to you or be there while you’re reading it—which means you’re getting two demographics. If we had just written a novel about this kind of concept, we’d never reach the kids. But by writing a kid's book, we also access the adults.

Your new show Central Park looks so incredible. What can you tell us about the show and your character Molly?

I am so excited for the show to come out. I’ve seen it and it is exceptional. It is so, so, so funny and so much fun. I signed on because I got a phone call from my friend Josh Gad, who said, “I’m going to try to put together a cartoon for us to work on.” And I said, “Yes. Goodbye.” And he and Loren Bochard, who created Bob’s Burgers, took basically all of our friends—Leslie Odom Jr., Stanley Tucci, Kathryn Hahn, Tituss Burgess, Daveed Diggs, and myself—and created a family who lives in the middle of Central Park.

I play a teenager named Molly who is very socially awkward but has this incredible, relentlessly creative, vivacious personality going on only inside her head … and it’s a musical! So, she's awkward on the outside but when she sings her songs she really comes to life. And she's a comic book artist, so the cartoon often switches to what she's seeing in her head.

It's so funny and Josh Gad plays this busker who lives in Central Park, who is the narrator. Stanley Tucci plays this older woman named Bitsy who is trying to build a shopping mall in the center of Central Park, and the family’s job is to basically save Central Park. But the music is so incredible. We’ve got two music writers, Kate Anderson and Elyssa Samsel, who write the majority of the music, but we also have guest writers that come in every episode. So Sara Bareilles wrote some music and Cyndi Lauper wrote some music. It is such a fun show.

My husband, who does not like cartoons or musicals, watched the first couple of episodes, and he looked at me and said, “You’ve got something really special in your hands.” And he doesn’t like anything. It made me so happy. I cannot wait until this show comes out, I am so proud of it.

What was it like to reunite with Josh Gad on another musical animated series that isn't Frozen?

Josh and I talk a lot, and we had a lot of behind-the-scenes conversations about how we can work together again, just because we adore each other. And part of it is because we get along socially, and part of it is because we trust each other comedically. He's a creator and writer more so than I am, so I usually leave it up to him and say, "What’s our next project?" We have other things in the pipeline we would love to do together, but [Central Park] was an immediate yes because I trust how he writes. Josh is at every single one of my recording sessions; he is very hands-on with the shows that he does or produces or creates. I trust him as much as I trust my husband, creatively, and that’s saying a lot.

Given your well-documented love of sloths, we do have to throw out a few true or false questions about sloths and put your knowledge to the test …

Oh my gosh. OK, now I'm nervous. Hit me.

True or false: Sloths fart more than humans.

Fart more than humans?

Yes.

I’m going to say it's true.

It’s actually false. Sloths don’t fart at all. They might be the only mammal on the planet that does not fart.

You’re kidding. Another reason to love them. You know, I was trying to think medically about it. I know they only poop once a week and that if you only go poop once a week ... I thought, “Well in order to keep your GI healthy, perhaps you have to have some sort of flow from the top to the bottom during the seven-day waiting period until you release.”

True or false: Sloths are so slow that algae sometimes grows on them.

One hundred percent true. In the wild, they’re always covered in algae and it helps their fur, all those microorganisms. But in zoos, they don’t have it.

Nice. OK, last one. True or false: Sloths poop from trees.

No way. They go down to the ground, and they rub their little tushies on the ground, and then they go back up.

You are correct.

I know a fair amount about sloths but the farting thing was new. My kids will be excited to hear that.

We heard recently that you are a part of the “foster failure” club. What went wrong? Erright?

Well, what I learned from Veronica Mars is you root for and cherish and uplift the underdog always. And my first foster failure was in 2018; I found the most undesirable dog that existed on the planet. She is made of toothpicks, it is impossible for her to gain weight. She has one eye. She looks like a walking piece of garbage. Her name is Barbara. She's 11 years old. And I saw a picture of her online and I said, “Yes. I just want to bring her over. I don’t even need to know anything else about her other than this picture," which was the most hideous picture. I mean it looks like a Rorschach painting or something. It was so awful. I was like, “She’s mine. I’ll take care of her. I’ve got this.” And it turns out she is quite lovely even though she can be pretty annoying. But she is our Barbara Biscuit, and she is one of the most charismatic dogs I have ever met. She piddles wherever she damn well pleases. So that is a bummer, because she is untrainable, but we love her.

That was our first failure. Then last year, we genuinely attempted to just foster a dog named Frank. And about two weeks in, I realized Frank was in love with me—like in a human way. He thought he was my boyfriend.

Oh no …

I just felt like … I didn’t even want a new dog—well I shouldn’t say that, because I always want all the dogs—but we weren’t planning on getting a new dog. But I had to have a conversation with my family and I said, “I think it’s going to be like child separation if I separate him. We have to keep him.” And sure enough, he can’t be more than two feet from me at any time during the day.

Does he still give you “the eyes”?

Oh my gosh. Bedroom eyes all day long. I can’t sit down without him like … not even just sitting comfortably in my lap. He has to have my arm in his mouth or part of my hair in his mouth. He’s trying to get back in my womb or something.

That’s love.

Yeah, I said, “What am I going to do? The guy is in love with me. He can live here.” So there is foster failure number two.

Wow, so it’s Frank and Barbara.

Frank and Barbara. And we also have Lola, a 17-year-old corgi-chow chow mix. Who I have had since she was one-and-a-half, who was also a pound puppy. She is our queen bee.

Before you go, we do this thing on Twitter called #HappyHour, where we ask our followers some get-to-know-you questions. If you could change one rule in any board game, what would it be?

I am obviously going to Catan ... oh I know exactly what I would do. In Catan, I would allow participants to buy a city without buying a settlement first. In Catan, you have to upgrade from a settlement to a city first, which is a waste of cards. If you have the cards for a city, you should be able to buy a city.

What was your favorite book as a child?

My favorite book as a child was Are You My Mother?

Aw, I love that one. I forgot about Are You My Mother?

It’s a good one.