Titanic II Is Preparing to Set Sail in 2022, and You Can Be On Board

Roderick Eime, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.0
Roderick Eime, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.0

Titanic is getting a sequel. No, James Cameron isn’t making another movie. A nearly identical replica of the doomed ship is scheduled to make its maiden voyage in 2022, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports, giving superfans the chance to experience the journey for themselves.

Dubbed the Titanic II, the new ship will start out in China, where it's under construction now, traveling to Dubai before picking passengers up in Southampton, England and following the original vessel’s 1912 route across the Atlantic to New York City. Of course, the original R.M.S. Titanic never reached its destination. It struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic, and more than half of the ship’s 2200 passengers perished when it sank.

Although the modern ship’s design is modeled after the original, there are a few notable differences. It will hold slightly more passengers—2400 in total, plus a 900-person crew—and will be 13 feet wider to meet modern regulations (and increase stability). Plus, passengers can rest easy knowing that the newer version is equipped with modern safety and navigation features, as well as detailed evacuation plans.

The superstitious probably won't be snatching up tickets for a ride on the revived Titanic, but history buffs and fans of the movie will likely appreciate the ship’s vintage decor and attention to detail. The Titanic II will have the same cabin layout, public areas, swimming pool, Turkish baths, and grand staircase as the original ship. When construction is completed, there will be nine floors and 840 cabins, and passengers will have their pick of first, second, or third-class tickets.

The Titanic II is the brainchild of Australian businessman Clive Palmer, who established a shipping company called Blue Star Line in 2012 in order to make the project a reality. The ship is under construction now and is expected to cost $500 million. It was originally slated to set sail in 2016, but financial issues delayed the departure first until 2018, and again until 2022.

After completing its journey to New York, the Titanic II will “circumnavigate the globe, inspiring and enchanting people while attracting unrivaled attention, intrigue, and mystery in every port she visits,” Palmer tells MSN.

Tickets aren't on sale yet, but keep an eye on the Blue Star Line website for updates.

[h/t AJC]

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

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Road Trip! Why Traveling By Car Is the Safest Way to Vacation Right Now

A road trip may be the safest way to travel during a pandemic.
A road trip may be the safest way to travel during a pandemic.
Andie_Alpion/iStock via Getty Images

There’s no question that the threat of COVID-19 has had a significant effect on how Americans travel. Summer, which is typically vacation season, has seen millions cancel or postpone plans to traverse the country.

While travel by any means may increase your odds of coming in contact with the virus, some methods are safer than others. Recently, Condé Nast Traveler spoke with a number of health experts for guidance on how to approach vacations via air, train, or the highway. The general consensus? If you’re going somewhere, try to go by car.

Air travel presents a number of scenarios where risk of transmission increases. Passengers have to wait in long lines where physical distancing will be difficult. Once on a plane, they could be seated fewer than 6 feet from other passengers. While airplane cabins do have highly effective air filtration systems, being close to someone infected still presents the very real possibility of being exposed to germs. A lack of uniform regulations about masks and distancing for airlines also means that procedures for reducing the risk of transmission may or may not be observed.

It’s important to note, however, that a recent study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology found that the risk of contracting COVID-19 from a passenger during a two-hour domestic flight is just 1 in 4300. If the middle seat is blocked off, thereby increasing the distance between travelers, the risk drops to 1 in 7700. While that doesn’t mitigate the risk of standing in long security screening lines indoors, it does indicate that air travel may not be inherently high-risk.

Travelers can further reduce the risk of infection if they opt to travel by train. In addition to having less congestion in passenger compartments than airplanes, lines usually form outdoors. But train trips also tend to be longer than flights, and the duration of exposure to someone infected can influence the risk of transmission.

So why is traveling by car superior? Unlike communal travel, cars afford a level of control. People can travel with members of their household with a known health history and don’t need to share space for extended periods with strangers. There is still risk in stopping and entering public spaces like restaurants, but physical distancing is more manageable in those scenarios than on a long-duration plane flight or train ride.

“If you have to—and can afford it—I think traveling by car is the safest option right now, in part because you’re not traveling with another person whose risk of infection may be unknown,” Chris Hendel, a medical researcher associated with the USC Gehr Family Center for Health Systems Science and Innovation, told Condé Nast Traveler. “Essentially you aren’t sharing the breathing space with someone who could be infected. But of course, one needs to be very cautious about stopping while traveling by car. I think train travel might possibly have an edge over air travel. Regardless, everyone should be wearing a mask on the train or in the plane.”

If you do decide on a road trip, it’s a good idea to limit exposure to others for 14 days prior to your departure so you reduce your chances of becoming infected before to your trip or transmitting the virus during it. When stopping to use a bathroom—often the riskiest portion of highway travel due to being in a confined space with others—try to find a single-occupancy restroom if possible and make sure you wear a mask. And eat somewhere with outdoor seating if you can. 

[h/t Condé Nast Traveler]