Titanic II Is Preparing to Set Sail in 2022, and You Can Be On Board

Roderick Eime, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.0
Roderick Eime, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY 2.0

Titanic is getting a sequel. No, James Cameron isn’t making another movie. A nearly identical replica of the doomed ship is scheduled to make its maiden voyage in 2022, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports, giving superfans the chance to experience the journey for themselves.

Dubbed the Titanic II, the new ship will start out in China, where it's under construction now, traveling to Dubai before picking passengers up in Southampton, England and following the original vessel’s 1912 route across the Atlantic to New York City. Of course, the original R.M.S. Titanic never reached its destination. It struck an iceberg in the North Atlantic, and more than half of the ship’s 2200 passengers perished when it sank.

Although the modern ship’s design is modeled after the original, there are a few notable differences. It will hold slightly more passengers—2400 in total, plus a 900-person crew—and will be 13 feet wider to meet modern regulations (and increase stability). Plus, passengers can rest easy knowing that the newer version is equipped with modern safety and navigation features, as well as detailed evacuation plans.

The superstitious probably won't be snatching up tickets for a ride on the revived Titanic, but history buffs and fans of the movie will likely appreciate the ship’s vintage decor and attention to detail. The Titanic II will have the same cabin layout, public areas, swimming pool, Turkish baths, and grand staircase as the original ship. When construction is completed, there will be nine floors and 840 cabins, and passengers will have their pick of first, second, or third-class tickets.

The Titanic II is the brainchild of Australian businessman Clive Palmer, who established a shipping company called Blue Star Line in 2012 in order to make the project a reality. The ship is under construction now and is expected to cost $500 million. It was originally slated to set sail in 2016, but financial issues delayed the departure first until 2018, and again until 2022.

After completing its journey to New York, the Titanic II will “circumnavigate the globe, inspiring and enchanting people while attracting unrivaled attention, intrigue, and mystery in every port she visits,” Palmer tells MSN.

Tickets aren't on sale yet, but keep an eye on the Blue Star Line website for updates.

[h/t AJC]

The Worst Airlines and Airports for Holiday Flight Delays

Tzido/iStock via Getty Images
Tzido/iStock via Getty Images

Before you can drink eggnog and exchange presents with your family during the holidays, you need to figure out how you'll get to them. Travel can be one of the most stressful aspects of what's already a frantic time of year. And even if you plan your trip perfectly, there's no way to guarantee your flight won't be delayed.

Beyond getting to the airport on time and keeping track of your flight status, there are steps you can take to help your flight run smoothly, like choosing the right airline and airport. As Lifehacker reports, the artificial Christmas tree site Treetopia recently compiled a list of average holiday season delay times for airports and airlines in the U.S.

The data comes from flight data collected by the government this time last year. In the airline category, Southwest is the worst offender, with 64 percent of all flights experiencing some type of delay during the Christmas season. Delays lasted an average of 19 minutes and only .88 percent of flights were canceled. Southwest is followed by Frontier, which delayed 50 percent of all flights for an average time of 22 minutes.

At the other end of the list is Delta, with the lowest percentage of delayed flights at 33 percent. The airline's average delay time for the 2018 holiday season was 13 minutes. It's followed closely by United Airlines, which also had 33 percent of flights delayed and had an average delay time of 17 minutes.

If you believe airports are more often to blame for delays than airlines, Treetopia broke down the numbers for them as well. Chicago Midway International seems to be the worst airport to fly from during the holidays, with 77 percent of all flights experiencing delays for an average of 25 minutes and 0.62 percent getting canceled altogether. Dayton International is the best place to travel from: Only 23 percent of flights out of the airport were delayed with an average time of 10 minutes.

Unfortunately, every airline and airport deals with the occasional delay. Here's what you should do if your flight gets canceled or delayed during your holiday travels.

[h/t Lifehacker]

Why You Should Never Charge Your Phone in Public USB Ports Without a USB Data Blocker

Creative-Family/iStock via Getty Images
Creative-Family/iStock via Getty Images

The USB charging ports that have popped up at airports, coffee shops, and even outdoor stations around cities in recent years are definitely a lifesaver when your smartphone is down to its last bit of juice. A dead phone is annoying at best and downright dangerous at worst, so it’s totally understandable why you’d jump at the chance to revive it at your earliest opportunity.

However, those public ports might not be as benevolent as they seem. According to Afar, hackers can load malware onto those stations—or on the cables left plugged into the stations—which can then deliver passwords and other data right from your device to the hacker’s. If you have used a public port recently, don’t panic; TechCrunch reports that these cases are fairly rare. Having said that, it’s definitely better not to risk it, especially considering what a nightmare it would be to have your identity stolen.

The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office explains that the easiest way to prevent becoming a victim of this type of scam, often referred to as juice-jacking, is simply to abstain from using public USB charging ports. Instead, invest in a portable charger, or plug your own charger into an actual AC power outlet.

But unoccupied power outlets are notoriously hard to come by in public places, and portable chargers themselves can also run out of battery life. Luckily, there’s a small, inexpensive device called a data blocker that will enable you to use public USB charging ports without worrying about juice-jacking. It looks a little like a flash drive with an extra slot, but it lacks the two wires usually found in USB chargers that can download and upload data. That way, your device will charge without transferring any information.

You can get two of them for $11 from Amazon here.

[h/t Afar]

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