Searching for a New Gig? The Cities With the Highest Job Growth in Each State, Mapped

iStock/gerenme
iStock/gerenme

Want to go where the jobs are? You don't necessarily need to move all the way across the country. A new analysis spotted by Thrillist identifies the city in each state where the most jobs have been created over the last five years, and some of the places with the biggest growth may surprise you.

The map below comes from the cost information site How Much, which used employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to track job growth between 2013 and 2018 in 381 metropolitan areas.

Overall, smaller or mid-sized cities seem to be where business is booming. In Austin, Texas, where job growth stands at 18.4 percent, the main driver of high-wage jobs recently has been the professional and business service sectors, according to Forbes. Similarly, Reno, Nevada, saw an 18 percent spike in jobs, largely due to growth in the city’s manufacturing, information, and business service industries.

The highest job growth, however, is happening in Louisiana. Since 2013, Lake Charles, Louisiana, has seen a 28.3 percent spike in job creation, the highest of any city in the country. (By comparison, New York City's job growth was just 5.3 percent.) The boom hasn't produced gains across all industries, though. Most job growth in Lake Charles over the last five years has occurred in the mining, logging, and construction industries, Thrillist notes. A planned $872 million power plant will likely bring even more jobs to the area in the future.

As How Much explains, more jobs don't necessarily mean higher wages. Five of the country's top 10 metro areas for job growth have median household incomes under $60,000. For instance, Elkhart, Indiana, which is known for manufacturing and supplying RVs, currently has one of the country's highest job growth rates, at 24 percent, but its median household income is only $58,960. Of the top job-growth cities, Austin's median household income is the highest, at $73,800.

Check out the How Much map below to see where new jobs are being added in your state, and explore the full data here.

A map of the U.S. showing the top city for job growth in each state
How Much

[h/t Thrillist]

The 20 Best States to Retire in 2020

Robert Clay Reed/iStock via Getty Images
Robert Clay Reed/iStock via Getty Images

Spending your workdays dreaming of retirement? It’s the ultimate goal of any longtime office-dweller, but figuring out when you’re ready to finally take the plunge is one of many questions aspiring retirees need to ask themselves before quitting the 9-to-5 grind for good. Determining where to retire is equally important, as you’ll need to think not just about affordability, but quality of life and health care as well.

Personal finance website WalletHub crunched the numbers on all 50 states to come up with an official ranking on the best (and worst) states to retire. Their experts looked at 47 different factors and enlisted the help of a panel of experts.

Ultimately, it turns out that the idea of retiring to Florida is still very much alive. The Sunshine State took the top spot in the poll, largely because of its affordability (it came in second in that category overall, with only Alabama besting it). But spending your golden years on a beach somewhere doesn’t seem to be for everyone; while Colorado and New Hampshire certainly have their warm-weather seasons, they also accumulate plenty of snow each year—which didn’t seem to matter as they clinched the second and third positions on the list, respectively. Here are the 20 best states to retire:

  1. Florida
  2. Colorado
  3. New Hampshire
  4. Utah
  5. Wyoming
  6. Delaware
  7. Virginia
  8. Wisconsin
  9. Idaho
  10. Iowa
  11. South Dakota
  12. Montana
  13. Pennsylvania
  14. Massachusetts
  15. Ohio
  16. Minnesota
  17. Texas
  18. South Carolina
  19. North Dakota
  20. Missouri

The news was far less happy for Kentucky, which claimed the last spot on the list (followed closely by New Mexico, Rhode Island, New Jersey, and West Virginia).

You can view an interactive version of the map below, and visit WalletHub to see more detailed information on each state’s ranking.

Source: WalletHub

Handy Chart Tells You When It's Too Cold to Walk Your Dog

iStock
iStock

Dogs have built-in fur coats, but they still get cold during their winter walks. Even if Fido isn’t hiding whenever you pull out the leash, you should still determine your dog’s tolerance for snowy romps, judging from this infographic spotted by Lifehacker, which is based on factors like size and breed (and not just enthusiasm for eating snow).

Infographic of the Tufts Animal Condition and Care (TACC) system, created by  Dr. Kim Smyth, a staff veterinarian with pet insurance company Petplan,
Petplan

Created by Dr. Kim Smyth, a staff veterinarian with pet insurance company Petplan, the chart is modeled after a scale developed by Tufts University that determines how canines respond to weather conditions depending on their builds. Before taking your four-legged friend outside, always check the temperature first (including wind chill), then reference the chart to gauge whether your dog can safely withstand the elements.

Small- to medium-sized dogs face cold-weather risks like hypothermia and frostbite when temperatures dip to 40°F. Larger dogs can tough it out for a little longer, but all pet owners should exercise caution and keep walks brief once the thermometer reaches 30°F. Canine accessories like sweaters or booties can safely prolong emergency bathroom strolls. Tiny pet shoes also protect vulnerable paws from sidewalk chemicals like antifreeze, according to NPR.

That said, no two canines—nor their fluff—are exactly alike. Dogs who are conditioned for the cold, or ones with heavy coats, fare better than older dogs or those with health conditions. Tiny, short-haired dogs may struggle too. Shivering is the first sign of hypothermia, Smyth told WBUR in an interview, so if you see your pups trembling, "you want to get these dogs inside, wrap them up in a warm towel or blanket, and get them to the vet if you need to," she says.

[h/t Lifehacker]

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