Wreckage of a World War II Nazi 'Flying Bomb' Found in English Forest

A. R. Coster, Topical Press Agency/Getty Images
A. R. Coster, Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

A detonated German V-1 flying bomb from World War II has been uncovered by archaeologists in the English countryside, Live Science reports. Also known as a “doodlebug,” this particular unmanned cruise missile was likely bound for London when it was launched in 1944. Instead, it was shot down over the Packing Wood forest in Kent, England, where it laid for more than 70 years.

The flying bomb was found last month by Research Resource, a private archaeological group run by brothers Colin and Sean Welch. Their research revealed that the V-1 was brought down by a Polish pilot on August 6, 1944.

"Kent was never a target, and the V-1s that fell were either brought down by fighter aircraft, anti-aircraft gunfire, the balloon barrage, or malfunction of the device,” Colin Welch told Kent Online. "This site at Packing Wood is remarkable as it appears that the missile crashed pretty cleanly in that its remains are within the center of the crater.”

Nearly 10,000 V-1 bombs were directed at targets in southeast England between 1944 and 1945, according to Colin Welch. Many were launched from German-occupied Holland.

These 1700-pound missiles were considered “retaliation weapons” and were ordered by Hitler in response to Allied bombings of German cities in 1943. V-1s were responsible for more than 6000 deaths in Britain—not to mention a great deal of destruction. One of these bombs obliterated George Orwell’s home in London in 1944 and nearly destroyed his manuscript of Animal Farm.

The Welch brothers have conducted several war-related projects in the Kent region, including a three-year excavation of the site where a V-2 rocket crashed. The brothers want to create an online museum to showcase 3D renderings of the weapons they’ve found.

"This is our history, and it's got to be documented somehow in a responsible way," Welch told Live Science.

[h/t Live Science]

Friday’s Best Amazon Deals Include Digital Projectors, Ugly Christmas Sweaters, and Speakers

Amazon
Amazon
As a recurring feature, our team combs the web and shares some amazing Amazon deals we’ve turned up. Here’s what caught our eye today, December 4. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers, including Amazon, and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we only get commission on items you buy and don’t return, so we’re only happy if you’re happy. Good luck deal hunting!

Archaeologists Discover the Jousting Yard Where Henry VIII Had His Historic Accident

National Trust, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
National Trust, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Henry VIII may have never earned his reputation as an ill-mannered tyrant if it weren't for injuries he sustained at age 44. Now, as Live Science reports, archaeologists have uncovered the infamous jousting yard where that history-changing accident took place.

Prior to the beheading of Anne Boleyn—his second of six wives—King Henry VIII was regarded as a kind, gregarious leader by those who knew him. The point where descriptions of him changed their tone coincided with a fall he took on January 24, 1536.

While jousting at Greenwich Palace, Henry was tossed from his armored horse and further injured when his steed fell on top of him. The incident caused him to lose consciousness for two hours and nearly cost him his life.

Though it was never diagnosed, some experts believe Henry VIII sustained a brain injury that day that altered his personality. From that point on, he was characterized as irritable and cruel. He was in constant pain from migraines and an ulcerated leg, which could also explain the mood shift. The (sometimes violent) dissolution of most of his marriages occurred post-accident.

Ruins of the jousting yard, or tiltyard, where that fateful incident took place are located 5.5 feet beneath the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, the former site of Greenwich Palace. After falling into disrepair, the palace was demolished by Charles II, and the exact location of the tiltyard was forgotten. A team of archaeologists led by Simon Withers of the University of Greenwich used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to locate the remnants buried beneath the ground earlier this year.

The giveaways were the footprints of two octagonal towers. The archaeologists say these were likely the foundations of the bleacher-like viewing stands where spectators watched jousting matches. That would place the historic tiltyard about 330 feet east of where it was originally thought to be situated.

The radar scans provided a peek at what lies beneath the Maritime Greenwich World Heritage Site, but to learn more, the archaeologists will need to get their hands dirty. Their next step will be digging up the site to get a better look at the ruins.

[h/t Live Science]