10 Surprising Facts About Eddie Redmayne

Miikka Skaffari, Getty Images for Breakthrough Prize
Miikka Skaffari, Getty Images for Breakthrough Prize

With his immense talent and considerable charm, it didn’t take long for Eddie Redmayne to make the leap from up-and-coming teen actor with a couple of TV roles on his resume to Academy Award winner.

Three years after his breakout role in 2012’s Les Misérables, Redmayne won the Best Actor Oscar for his brilliant portrayal of the late Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything (and earned a second nomination the following year for The Danish Girl). Adding to his fame, Redmayne then joined the Harry Potter franchise, starring as Newt Scamander in 2016’s Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them.

As Redmayne prepares to reprise the magical role for the Fantastic Beasts sequel, The Crimes of Grindelwald, we’ve gathered up some surprising facts about the 36-year-old actor.

1. HE WAS CLASSMATES WITH PRINCE WILLIAM.

The actor has revealed that while in school at Eton College, he was classmates with Prince William, Duke of Cambridge. The two were even elected for The Eton Society, an elite group at the school, and played rugby together. “He’s a wonderful man,” Redmayne told Glamour. “I always felt slightly sorry for him because everyone wanted to tackle the future king of England. He took all the hits.”

Other famous schoolmates of Redmayne at Eton were Avengers actor Tom Hiddleston and William’s younger brother, Prince Harry.

2. HE IS COLORBLIND (SORT OF).

Cindy Ord, Getty Images for SiriusXM

Redmayne has been very open about being slightly colorblind, something his wife Hannah Bagshawe helps him out with when it comes to fashion.

“I almost feel like a bit of a fraud when I say I’m colorblind, because I see in color,” Redmayne explained to GQ. “[I have problems when], for example, I’m shooting a scene, and you have to hit a mark on the floor, and it’s a red marker on green grass. With my peripheral vision I haven’t got a chance. If I look down I can see the difference between the red and the green, but I don’t know how to explain it to people.”

3. HE FIRST REALIZED HE WAS FAMOUS WHEN HE WAS ON A PLANE ... SLEEPING.

Like most actors, Redmayne first realized his level of fame when he was recognized off the set. But when it happened for him, he was sleeping … and on a plane. He once explained that after he awoke during a flight, the passenger sitting next to him asked if he was important, because the flight attendants were watching him sleep.

4. HE WAS EMBARRASSED OF HIS FRECKLES UNTIL HE MET JULIANNE MOORE.

With countless freckles all over his face, Redmayne was admittedly embarrassed by them growing up ... then he auditioned for the role of Julianne Moore’s son in 2007’s Savage Grace. Redmayne told Conan O’Brien that Moore walked in and knew he had to be cast just on appearance alone. (He was.)

5. HE LIED ABOUT HIS HORSEBACK RIDING EXPERIENCE TO LAND A ROLE.

During auditions for the TV miniseries Elizabeth I, Redmayne gave director Tom Hooper the impression that he was an expert horseback rider. Unfortunately, he was lying—and when it came down to actually performing the task, it was more than obvious he had never been on a horse.

“I almost killed myself, almost killed half of the crew,” Redmayne told Conan O’Brien, explaining how Hooper then promptly got on the loudspeaker to yell, “You’re a f***ing liar, Redmayne!”

6. STEPHEN HAWKING PRAISED HIS PERFORMANCE IN THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING.

Liam Daniel, Universal Pictures

When Redmayne portrayed Stephen Hawking for The Theory of Everything, even Hawking was impressed. In addition to sharing his praise for the actor on his Facebook page, the film’s director James Marsh shared how intense the famed physicist’s reaction to the movie truly was. “He emailed us, and said there were certain points when he thought he was watching himself,” Marsh told Variety.

7. HE BECAME THE FIRST MAN BORN IN THE 1980S TO WIN AN OSCAR IN ACTING.

For his portrayal of Hawking, Redmayne became the first man born in the 1980s to win an Academy Award for acting. He is also one of 17 actors who have won Oscars for portraying real-life people while they were alive. (Hawking passed away three years after Redmayne’s win.)

8. HIS AUDITION FOR STARS WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS WAS A BIT OF A DISASTER.

Kevin Winter, Getty Images

Before he became a part of the world of Harry Potter, Redmayne auditioned to become a part of the Star Wars galaxy. He auditioned for the role of Kylo Ren in The Force Awakens, but Redmayne said the production was so secretive that he really had no idea who the character was or how he fit into the story. To compensate, he tried doing a Darth Vader imitation. It did not go well.

“My Star Wars audition was pretty catastrophically bad,” he admitted in 2014. “There’s this wonderful casting director called Nina Gold, who I absolutely love. I went in and did this scene and after seven times of trying to play a baddie [Gold] was like, ‘Got anything else, Eddie?’ I said, ‘Okay, that’s a childhood dream crushed.'"

9. HE AUDITIONED FOR THE ROLE OF TOM RIDDLE IN HARRY POTTER.

Years before scoring the lead role in Fantastic Beasts, Redmayne auditioned for the original Harry Potter series. “I actually auditioned to play Tom Riddle when I was back at university,” Redmayne told Empire. “I properly failed and didn’t get a call back. Over the years I always hoped I might be cast as a member of the Weasley family, but unfortunately not."

10. HE WAS THE FIRST AND ONLY CHOICE FOR FANTASTIC BEASTS.

Jaap Buitendijk, Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc.

Though Redmayne didn't land the part of Riddle, that failed audition got his foot in the door of the Harry Potter universe. When it came time to cast Newt Scamander in Fantastic Beasts, producer David Heyman immediately thought of Redmayne.

"From the outset, Eddie Redmayne was our first and only choice,” Heyman told The Telegraph. “Not only does he look as if he lives in 1926, but he has all the elements required to be Newt: he’s smart, funny, utterly British, and immensely sympathetic—even as an outsider more comfortable with his beasts than with people."

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Take Two: When Kim Jong-il Raised North Korea's World Cinema Profile By Kidnapping Two South Korean Stars

Kim Jong-Il, Choi Eun-hie, and Shin Sang-ok in a scene from Ross Adam and Robert Cannan's The Lovers & the Despot (2016).
Kim Jong-Il, Choi Eun-hie, and Shin Sang-ok in a scene from Ross Adam and Robert Cannan's The Lovers & the Despot (2016).
Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Choi Eun-hee knew there was trouble even before the needle sent her into unconsciousness.

It was 1978, and Choi, one of South Korea’s most prominent actresses, was struggling to regain the success she had achieved earlier in her career. A promise of a possible film partnership by a man claiming to be from Hong Kong had lured her to Repulse Bay, a waterfront locale in the southern part of Hong Kong Island, where she exited a vehicle and noticed a group of men standing near a boat. Choi sensed something wasn't quite right, but before she could consider it any further, she was grabbed, sedated, and thrown onboard.

When she awoke, Choi found herself in the captain’s quarters. Above her was a portrait of Kim Jong-il, then the chief of North Korea’s Propaganda and Agitation Department. Kim’s father, Kim Il-sung, was the leader of the country, a communist regime that had now seemingly absconded with Choi—for reasons the actress couldn't imagine.

Roughly eight days after being kidnapped, Choi found herself in Pyongyang, where Kim greeted her not as someone who had been forcibly subdued and delivered to him, but as an honored guest. In a way, she was. In Kim’s mind, Choi and her ex-husband, award-winning film director Shin Sang-ok (who would soon join them, also involuntarily) were the very people the country needed to spearhead a new era in North Korean filmmaking, one that would make the entire world sit up and take notice.

That both Choi and Shin would be captives of the state was of little concern to those in charge. Regardless of how their guests got there, they were there. And Kim had no intention of letting them leave.

 

Kim, who eventually succeeded his father as leader of North Korea and ruled from 1994 until his death in 2011, was a movie buff. He reportedly owned more than 30,000 films—including a great deal of pornography—and ordered traveling diplomats to bring back copies of international films for his enjoyment. Kim even authored a book, 1973’s On the Art of Cinema, that was intended as an instructional guide for filmmakers in the country. He preached a devotion to a singular, unified vision and bemoaned that North Korean films had too much ideology and crying in them. All but ignored by the rest of the film world, Kim wanted the North producing features that would be embraced by film festivals.

Kim Jong-il loved movies so much he decided to abduct some talent.Getty Images (Kim Jong-il) // JurgaR/iStock via Getty Images (Movie Theater). Photo composite by Mental Floss.

At the time, it was not uncommon for North Korea to fill a need for trained workers simply by kidnapping them. It had worked for the country when they wanted to learn more about South Korea; between 1977 and 1978, they abducted five South Korean high school students who became instructors for future undercover Northern operatives. They also once attempted to kidnap a concert pianist, who grew wise to the situation when he arrived for his private appointment and heard several people speaking with North Korean accents. (He fled.) Even so, Kim used a similar strategy when he decided that kidnapping an actor and director would be the most effective way to achieve his movie aspirations.

Choi was only one part of the plan. Once she was grabbed, Shin began a desperate search for her. The two, who had once been considered a “golden couple” in South Korea, had divorced in 1976 following Shin's affair with a younger actress, but they remained close.

Of course, Shin was a cinematic superstar in his own right. Though his career had also recently cooled off, he was a celebrated director who had once been referred to as "the Orson Welles of South Korea." Though there are different stories as to how Shin ended up in North Korea, the official version is that he wanted to help locate his missing ex. And when that trail eventually led him to Hong Kong, Shin, too, soon found himself with a bag over his head, being hustled to Pyongyang. While Choi had resigned herself to some acceptance of her fate—she was living in a luxurious villa surrounded by guards—Shin was more combative. After numerous escape attempts, he was sent to prison.

For four years, Shin subsisted on a diet of grass, salt, and rice, never once seeing Choi or getting any update about her safety. As far as Shin knew, she was dead. Finally, in 1983, Shin was released and “invited” to a reception. To their mutual shock, the former couple was reunited, neither one knowing the other had been there the entire time.

Kim apologized for the delayed meeting, saying he had been busy. On the subject of Shin being imprisoned for four years, he dismissed it as a misunderstanding. It was only then that Kim explained why the two were there: North Korean filmmakers had no new ideas, he explained, so he wanted Shin and Choi to make films that would establish North Korea in the movie business.

None of it was presented as a choice. That same year, the couple remarried—also reportedly at Kim's suggestion.

The filmmakers spent years trapped in North Korea.NatanaelGinting/iStock via Getty Images

There was discussion of escape, particularly when the couple was allowed to travel to Berlin to scout locations for productions, but Shin dismissed it.

"What's the matter with you?" Shin recalled telling Choi in his 1988 memoir, Kingdom of Kim. "I will not make an attempt unless it's 100 percent certain. If they caught us, we'd be dead."

Instead, Shin pondered the opportunity. Kim gave him the equivalent of $3 million as an annual salary, for both personal and professional use. His production offices grew to more than 700 employees. Aside from some firm edicts—Kim wanted to project an image of North Korea as a political titan, while somehow softening its image as a totalitarian terror—Shin had a large degree of creative freedom. He filmed North Korea’s first onscreen kiss. He made Runaway, a 1984 film about a wandering Korean family in 1920s Manchuria, that Shin believed was the best film of his career.

Most famously, he directed Pulgasari, a monster movie clearly inspired by Godzilla that featured an oversized monster aiding an army of farmers looking to overthrow a cruel king. Kim even convinced several filmmakers who worked on the Godzilla films to come to North Korea to assist with the production by guaranteeing their safety. Kenpachiro Satsuma, who was the second person to wear the Godzilla suit, performed as Pulgasari. Thousands of North Korean soldiers were used as extras.

 

Kim was very happy with the work Shin and Choi were producing, which grew to seven films. Some had even made it to festivals in the Eastern Bloc. Gradually, he gave them more and more freedom to travel, eventually allowing them to take an escorted trip to Vienna in 1986 to help stir up a possible European distributor that would make a North Korean film easier to circulate. As they were preparing to leave for Austria, the two decided to act.

"To be in Korea living a good life ourselves and enjoying movies while everyone else was not free was not happiness, but agony," Shin wrote.

Choi Eun-hee and Shin Sang-ok in The Lovers & the Despot (2016).Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

The two got in touch with a Japanese film critic they knew and met him for lunch. With North Korean guards in pursuit, Shin and Choi took a taxi to the American embassy and explained their eight-year ordeal as creative captives of Kim. Within a week, they were telling their story to reporters in Baltimore, Maryland, as well as the CIA.

North Korea denied that the two had been there against their will, arguing that they simply wanted to escape the restrictive nature of South Korean filmmaking. But Choi had seen to it that they came back with evidence. She had snuck an audio cassette recorder into her handbag during one meeting with Kim, who advised that if they were ever asked what they were doing in North Korea, to say that they were there voluntarily. She had even managed to have the tape smuggled out of the country before escaping, a stunt that could have resulted in her death if the betrayal had been discovered. For those in the U.S. government gathering intelligence on North Korea, it was the first time Kim’s voice had ever been heard.

Shin and Choi remained in the United States, where they had been granted political asylum. Shin even directed the 1995 film Three Ninjas Knuckle Up and produced several more movies under the pseudonym Simon Sheen. They eventually returned to South Korea in 1999, though some South Koreans believed Shin had gone to the North and pledged allegiance to communism voluntarily and treated him with suspicion.

"I could not dare return [to South Korea] without evidence that I had been kidnapped to the North," Shin said in an interview. "If [the Seoul government] charged me with entering the North on my own and cooperating with the North Koreans, I would have had no evidence to deny it."

Shin and Choi's story was explored in depth in Ross Adam and Robert Cannan's documentary The Lovers & the Despot, which was nominated for a Grand Jury Prize at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival.

Shin died in 2006, Choi in 2018. In a 2015 interview with Korea JoongAng Daily, Choi said that she still had nightmares about being pursued by North Korean agents. "Even though [Kim Jong-il] did not use the right means to get what he wanted, I understood his desire to develop the North Korean movie industry," she said. "He mentioned that he wanted to bring about change to North Korean movies, all of which were similar in terms of directing and acting. But please don't misunderstand that my forgiveness of him means that I agree with the North Korean system, because I don't."

Though North Korea never did admit to abducting the pair, in 2002 Kim Jong-il did come clean about snatching several Japanese tourists in the late 1970s and 1980s, and issued a formal apology.

When it finally received a wider release, Pulgasari was dismissed as silly. Now under the leadership of Kim Jong-un, North Korea has yet to make any impact on the international film scene.