The 10 Most Pet-Friendly Airports in America

iStock.com/Jodi Jacobson
iStock.com/Jodi Jacobson

Traveling with pets can be challenging. You have to find pet-friendly hotels and restaurants, not to mention having to figure out what type of transportation you’ll take. A new ranking of the 10 most pet-friendly airports in America makes the whole process a little bit easier for pet parents, though.

According to Upgraded Points, an online resource that provides information on credit card travel rewards, New York City's John F. Kennedy International Airport is the best airport for animals in the U.S. The site took different factors into account, including the number and quality of “pet relief stations” (places where animals can pee without other passengers getting peeved), onsite boarding and daycare facilities, and other pet perks, such as dog parks with water fountains. The airports were ranked according to a point system, with 10 being the maximum number of points awarded; JFK Airport received a perfect score.

“JFK is definitely the airport to beat when it comes to pet-friendly amenities,” the site said in its analysis. “Multiple terminals have access to post-security pet relief areas, so you’re never far away from one without having to leave the secured area of the airport.”

The airport provides 24/7 access to veterinary services for all sorts of animals, as well as plenty of potty areas. One of the terminals even has a 4000-square-foot outdoor garden patio, better known as the “wooftop,” where doggies can get some fresh air and run free. (It also beats waiting for your plane in a stuffy gate area.)

Despite being the busiest airport in the world with nearly 104 million passengers last year, the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport still finds time to cater to four-legged travelers. It received a score of 9.5, making it the country's second most pet-friendly airport. Some of its selling points include indoor pet-relief stations in every concourse (with faux fire hydrants adding a nice finishing touch) and a 1000-square-foot dog park.

Keep scrolling to see the full list, and visit the Upgraded Points website for a detailed breakdown of the data.

1. John F. Kennedy International Airport: 10 points
2. Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport: 9.5 points
3. Sky Harbor International Airport: 9 points
4. Los Angeles International Airport: 8.5 points
5. Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport: 8.25 points
6. Austin-Bergstrom International Airport: 7.75 points
7. Reno-Tahoe International Airport: 7.5 points
8. Dallas Love Field Airport: 7.25 points
9. Denver International Airport: 7 points
10. Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport: 6.75 points

Driving This Thanksgiving Holiday? Here’s the Worst Time to Leave, According to Google Maps

Marcos Assis/iStock via Getty Images
Marcos Assis/iStock via Getty Images

For many people, cooking the turkey correctly or dodging political arguments with family members aren't the most stressful parts of Thanksgiving. It's having to share the road with millions of other travelers on the way to Thanksgiving dinner. If you're hoping to make this element of the holiday a little more tolerable in 2019, plan your day with data from Google Maps.

As Travel + Leisure reports, Google Maps recently published a roundup of Thanksgiving travel tips, including the absolute worst times to hit the road. You may think that leaving the day before Thanksgiving will give you a head-start on traffic, but according to Google, Wednesday is the busiest travel day of the week. Congestion peaks between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Wednesday in many parts of the country. If you have no choice but to travel on November 27, plan to leave earlier in the day before roads get too crowded.

It pays to leave the house early the day of the actual holiday. Around 6 a.m., roads will be clear in most major cities, with traffic gradually increasing throughout the morning and peaking as early as noon.

As people who regularly travel for Turkey Day know, getting to dinner on time is only half the headache. Traffic can be just as brutal on the way home. To make the journey as painless as possible, plan to leave first thing in the morning—ideally on Sunday, when most travelers have completed the trip.

Traveling for Thanksgiving is rarely as simple as driving to and from dinner. If you plan on making pit stops along the way, Google has travel information for that as well. According to Google search trends, "ham shops" are busiest at noon the day before Thanksgiving, and outlet malls reach peak traffic around noon on Black Friday. Here are some more stress-free travel tips for the holiday season.

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

Journey to the Monarch Mosh Pit

iStock/Spondylolithesis
iStock/Spondylolithesis

Each fall, millions of migrating monarchs return to Mexico to wait out winter. The gathering makes Woodstock look like a business conference. Here’s how they get there.

Mosh Pit

In the mountains of central Mexico, the butterflies crowd on the branches of oyamel fir trees. The trees provide a perfect microclimate that prevents the butterflies from getting too hot or cold.

Texas Toast

After winter, the butterflies fly north to Texas in search of milkweed, where they lay their eggs. Many adults will die here; northbound monarchs generally live only three to seven weeks.

Juice Cleanse

One of the reasons monarchs love milkweed? Protection. As caterpillars, they absorb the toxins in the plant, which makes them less tasty to birds.

Connecting Flight

Eventually, a new generation of butterflies will make its way north to Canada. It takes multiple generations of butterflies to reach their final, most northerly destination.

Dine and Dash

On the way, butterflies will eat practically anything. Sure, there’s nectar—but they’ll also slurp the salts in mud.

Catching Air

When fall returns, a new generation of monarchs rides the air currents more than 3000 miles back to Mexico. They navigate by calibrating their body clocks with the position of the sun. (An internal magnetic compass helps them navigate on cloudy days.)

Latitude Adjustment

Monarchs “are one of the few creatures on Earth that can orient themselves both in latitude and longitude,” The New York Times reports—a feat sailors wouldn’t accomplish until the 1700s.

Southern Charm

Miraculously, each generation of southbound monarchs lives up to eight months—six times longer than their northbound descendants. Their longevity might have something to do with a process known as reproductive diapause (which is a fancy way of saying that the insects won’t breed until winter ends).

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