Hawaii Has Been Named the Healthiest State in America

iStock.com/FatCamera
iStock.com/FatCamera

Hawaii may be thousands of miles removed from the continental U.S., but the state's residents don't seem worse off for it. As Thrillist reports, America's 50th state also happens to be the healthiest one in the nation.

This finding comes from the United Health Foundation, which releases the "America's Health Rankings Annual Report" each year. Factors that affect both physical and mental health, as well as social well-being, are taken into account.

"For nearly three decades, America's Health Rankings Annual Report has analyzed a comprehensive set of behaviors, public and health policies, community and environmental conditions, and clinical care data to provide a holistic view of the health of the people in the nation," the foundation writes on its website.

Hawaii has been named the healthiest state in the U.S. nine times since 1990, when the first report was released. So what exactly are our island-dwelling counterparts doing right? For one thing, the state has low obesity and smoking rates compared to the national average. Residents enjoy low levels of air pollution, very little mental distress among adults, and a high number of available primary care physicians.

Following Hawaii, the healthiest states in the nation are Massachusetts, Connecticut, Vermont, and Utah. The report also highlights the unhealthiest states—or, as the foundation delicately puts it, those that have "the greatest opportunity for improvement." Louisiana fared worst overall for health, largely because of its high rates of smoking, obesity, and children who live in poverty (28 percent). Mississippi comes in 49th place, followed by Alabama, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.

Maine saw the most improvement overall, having jumped seven places to number 16. It primarily improved in the areas of smoking and child poverty. Dropping four places, Oklahoma was the state that saw the biggest decline. Its obesity and physical inactivity rates both went up.

Check out the full report here [PDF] for more details on the state of the nation's health, or scroll down to see the state ranking.

1. Hawaii
2. Massachusetts
3. Connecticut
4. Vermont
5. Utah
6. New Hampshire
7. Minnesota
8. Colorado
9. Washington
10. New York
11. New Jersey
12. California
13. North Dakota
14. Rhode Island
15. Nebraska
16. Idaho
17. Maine
18. Iowa
19. Maryland
20. Virginia
21. Montana
22. Oregon
23. Wisconsin
24. Wyoming
25. South Dakota
26. Illinois
27. Kansas
28. Pennsylvania
29. Florida
30. Arizona
31. Delaware
32. Alaska
33. North Carolina
34. Michigan
35. New Mexico
36. Nevada
37. Texas
38. Missouri
39. Georgia
40. Ohio
41. Indiana
42. Tennessee
43. South Carolina
44. West Virginia
45. Kentucky
46. Arkansas
47. Oklahoma
48. Alabama
49. Mississippi
50. Louisiana

[h/t Thrillist]

Wayfair’s Fourth of July Clearance Sale Takes Up to 60 Percent Off Grills and Outdoor Furniture

Wayfair/Weber
Wayfair/Weber

This Fourth of July, Wayfair is making sure you can turn your backyard into an oasis while keeping your bank account intact with a clearance sale that features savings of up to 60 percent on essentials like chairs, hammocks, games, and grills. Take a look at some of the highlights below.

Outdoor Furniture

Brisbane bench from Wayfair
Brisbane/Wayfair

- Jericho 9-Foot Market Umbrella $92 (Save 15 percent)
- Woodstock Patio Chairs (Set of Two) $310 (Save 54 percent)
- Brisbane Wooden Storage Bench $243 (Save 62 percent)
- Kordell Nine-Piece Rattan Sectional Seating Group with Cushions $1800 (Save 27 percent)
- Nelsonville 12-Piece Multiple Chairs Seating Group $1860 (Save 56 percent)
- Collingswood Three-Piece Seating Group with Cushions $410 (Save 33 percent)

Grills and Accessories

Dyna-Glo electric smoker.
Dyna-Glo/Wayfair

- Spirit® II E-310 Gas Grill $479 (Save 17 percent)
- Portable Three-Burner Propane Gas Grill $104 (Save 20 percent)
- Digital Bluetooth Electric Smoker $224 (Save 25 percent)
- Cuisinart Grilling Tool Set $38 (Save 5 percent)

Outdoor games

American flag cornhole game.
GoSports

- American Flag Cornhole Board $57 (Save 19 percent)
- Giant Four in a Row Game $30 (Save 6 percent)
- Giant Jenga Game $119 (Save 30 percent)

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

How the Scientist Who Invented Ibuprofen Accidentally Discovered It Was Great for Hangovers

This man had too many dry martinis at a business lunch.
This man had too many dry martinis at a business lunch.
George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images

When British pharmacologist Stewart Adams and his colleague John Nicholson began tinkering with various drug compounds in the 1950s, they were hoping to come up with a cure for rheumatoid arthritis—something with the anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin, but without the risk of allergic reaction or internal bleeding.

Though they never exactly cured rheumatoid arthritis, they did succeed in developing a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that greatly reduced pain of all kinds. In 1966, they patented their creation, which was first known as 2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propionic acid and later renamed ibuprofen. While originally approved as a prescription drug in the UK, it soon became clear ibuprofen was safer and more effective than other pain relievers. It eventually hit the market as an over-the-counter medication.

During that time, Adams conducted one last impromptu experiment with the drug, which took place far outside the lab and involved only a single participant: himself.

In 1971, Adams arrived in Moscow to speak at a pharmacology conference and spent the night before his scheduled appearance tossing back shots of vodka at a reception with the other attendees. When he awoke the next morning, he was greeted with a hammering headache. So, as Smithsonian.com reports, Adams tossed back 600 milligrams of ibuprofen.

“That was testing the drug in anger, if you like,” Adams told The Telegraph in 2007. “But I hoped it really could work magic.”

As anyone who has ever been in that situation can probably predict, the ibuprofen did work magic on Adams’s hangover. After that, according to The Washington Post, the pharmaceutical company Adams worked for began promoting the drug as a general painkiller, and people started to stumble upon its use as a miracle hangover cure.

“It's funny now,” Adams told The Telegraph. “But over the years so many people have told me that ibuprofen really works for them, and did I know it was so good for hangovers? Of course, I had to admit I did.”

[h/t Smithsonian.com]