How to Avoid the Chilling Consequences of Frostbite

iStock.com/ArtShotPhoto
iStock.com/ArtShotPhoto

A healthy portion of the United States is currently suffering the effects of the polar vortex, a weather phenomenon that has seen temperatures plummet to as low as -26°F in Chicago. Factor in wind speed and anyone caught outside could have to endure wind chills hitting -60°F. For contrast, the Popsicles in your freezer are likely chilling out at a mere 0°F.

These extreme conditions have some real and alarming consequences. In Madison, Wisconsin, seven people were treated Wednesday night for frostbite symptoms, which result from the body rerouting blood and oxygen from extremities to major organs in response to frigid temperatures. As blood vessels narrow, tiny ice crystals form in the skin. The skin freezes, turning blue, firm, or waxy in appearance. Blisters can form. It can also feel numb or tingle. Left untreated, permanent nerve damage or gangrene can result, possibly requiring amputation of the affected body parts.

The risk of developing frostbite depends on duration of exposure and wind chill. The lower the temperature, the less time it takes to develop complications. At a wind chill of -22°F, it would take 31 minutes of exposure. At -45°F, you've got six minutes. Fingers, toes, noses, cheeks, and ears are the sites most commonly affected.

Frostbite stages depend on how deep it's penetrated the skin. Simple frostbite, or frostnip, is superficial, with some redness and subsequent numbness. Warm skin is an indication the frostbite is more advanced. Deep frostbite, which can reach subcutaneous tissue, could mean tissue death.

If you begin to notice symptoms of frostbite, follow your instincts and seek shelter immediately. Once you're inside, resist the urge to rub the affected skin, run it under hot water, or apply a hot compress: Because of the numbness, you won't be able to tell if you're burning yourself. Instead, use warm water and your own body heat—like tucking fingers into your armpits—until you can be seen by a doctor. (Some people may benefit from home treatment until the skin returns to its normal color. If you're unsure, it's best to seek medical advice.)

Of potentially greater concern is hypothermia, a condition in which people lose too much body heat, often brought on by the combination of low temperatures and wet clothing. As the body temperature plummets, people can become disoriented or even lose consciousness. Hypothermia requires medical attention. If the hypothermic person is awake, drinking warm beverages and getting wrapped in warm blankets may help until they can be seen by a physician.

Naturally, the best prevention for both frostbite and hypothermia is avoidance. Stay indoors, preferably until spring.

[h/t The New York Times]

This Gorgeous Vintage Edition of Clue Sets the Perfect Mood for a Murder Mystery

WS Game Company
WS Game Company

Everyone should have a few good board games lying around the house for official game nights with family and friends and to kill some time on the occasional rainy day. But if your collection leaves a lot to be desired, you can class-up your selection with this great deal on the Vintage Bookshelf Edition of Clue for $40.

A brief history of Clue

'Clue' Vintage Bookshelf Edition.
WS Game Company.

Originally titled Murder!, Clue was created by a musician named Anthony Pratt in Birmingham, England, in 1943, and he filed a patent for it in 1944. He sold the game to Waddington's in the UK a few years later, and they changed the name to Cluedo in 1949 (that name was a mix between the words clue and Ludo, which was a 19th-century game.) That same year, the game was licensed to Parker Brothers in the United States, where it was published as Clue. Since then, there have been numerous special editions and spinoffs of the original game, not to mention books and a television series based on it. Most notably, though, was the cult classic 1985 film Clue, which featured Eileen Brennan, Tim Curry, Madeline Kahn, Christopher Lloyd, Michael McKean, Martin Mull, and Lesley Ann Warren.

As you probably know, every game of Clue begins with the revelation of a murder. The object of the game is to be the first person to deduce who did it, with what weapon, and where. To achieve that end, each player assumes the role of one of the suspects and moves strategically around the board collecting clues.

With its emphasis on logic and critical thinking—in addition to some old-fashioned luck—Clue is a masterpiece that has stood the test of time and evolved with each decade, with special versions of the game hitting shelves recently based on The Office, Rick and Morty, and Star Wars.

Clue Vintage Bookshelf Edition

'Clue' Vintage Library Edition.
WS Game Company

The Vintage Bookshelf Edition of Clue is the work of the WS Game Company, a licensee of Hasbro, and all the design elements are inspired by the aesthetic of the 1949 original. The game features a vintage-looking game board, cards, wood movers, die-cast weapons, six pencils, an ivory-colored die, an envelope, and a pad of “detective notes.” And, of course, everything folds up and stores inside a beautiful cloth-bound book box that you can store right on the shelf in your living room.

Clue Vintage Bookshelf Edition is a limited-release item, and right now you can get it for $40.

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How to Make Wearing a Face Mask More Comfortable During the Warm, Sweaty Summer Months

Cloth face masks can make for a sweaty summer.
Cloth face masks can make for a sweaty summer.
elladoro/iStock via Getty Images

As the coronavirus pandemic continues to challenge the world’s population to rethink everyday behaviors, it seems likely people will continue to practice both social distancing and the use of a cloth face mask throughout the summer. (Cloth masks can’t stop infectious particles from entering the nose and mouth, but they can reduce the spread of respiratory droplets by wearers.)

Once tolerable, these masks might grow to be uncomfortable as temperatures rise and the fabric begins to trap heat. Fortunately, there are some steps you can take to minimize discomfort.

According to health experts who spoke to writer Nick Vadala of The Philadelphia Inquirer, the best strategy for a heat-friendly face mask is to opt for a 100 percent cotton fabric. Polyester and other synthetic materials can trap heat, causing wearers to build up sweat and moisture around their face quickly.

You’ll want to avoid any kind of filter, which are also synthetic and make breathing more difficult.

Snug masks can also be harder to tolerate when it’s warm out. To adjust the fit, it’s better to use a mask that has ties rather than elastic straps, which can irritate the ears.

The biggest adjustment wearers may have to make in adhering to mask recommendations in the summer is to carry more than one. As masks get damp from sweat, they’ll need to be switched out for a dry one. You’ll want to be sure to do that only after washing or sanitizing your hands and making the switch away from other people.

Despite your best efforts, skin irritation might persist. It’s a good idea to use moisturizer to heal skin affected by trapped heat and moisture.

[h/t The Philadelphia Inquirer]