13 Unusual Road Signs from Around the World

iStock/georgeclerk
iStock/georgeclerk

Driving in other countries can be challenging. Whether the steering wheel is on the opposite side of the car, you're driving on the "wrong" side of the street, or the road signs and their meanings are perplexing, it's easy to get confused. Here are few unusual road signs—and explanations of what they mean—from around the world.

1. Steep Cliff Road Sign // Argentina


istock.com/OlafSpeier

No, cars don't have a tendency to levitate in Argentina. This road sign is meant to remind drivers to be cautious about their speeds on an upcoming hill.

2. Llama Crossing Road Sign // Bolivia

Llama crossing road sign in Bolivia
iStock.com/javarman3

When you're driving in Bolivia and other countries in South America, you should be on the lookout for llamas crossing the road. We hear they spit.

3. Blind Hill Road Sign // Iceland


istock.com/slavemotion

Listen up, Iceland! That exclamation point is meant to draw your attention to the upcoming blindhæð, or "blind hill," where you can't see if anyone is coming toward you from the other side.

4. Hedgehog Road Sign // United Kingdom


istock.com/naumoid

Make sure you have the strongest tires possible if you're driving through the UK and miss this road sign—it warns motorists that spiky but adorable hedgehogs are in the vicinity. Or better yet, drive extra carefully and avoid running over these little guys altogether.

5. Sled Crossing Road Sign // Greenland


istock.com/Yvonne Wacht

In a country with very few roads and a lot of ice, dogsleds are one of the best ways to get around. This sign in Greenland alerts drivers that there could be sleds ahead.

6. Oryx Crossing Road Sign // Southern Africa


istock.com/2630ben

We know that an oryx, a type of African antelope, will attack a drone. We don't know if it will attack your car. Just to be safe, heed these road signs found in several southern African countries.

7. Prohibited Conveyance Road Sign // Israel


istock.com/tzahiV

This looks like it could be a landing spot in your favorite board game, but it's actually an Israeli road sign letting drivers know what modes of transportation aren't allowed in this area.

8. Dead End Sign // Germany


istock.com/PierreOlivierClementMantion

This German sign does not indicate the top of a pogo stick, or that there is a bike tire pump nearby. The red line at the top of the white line on this road sign actually represents a dead end street.

9. No Overtaking Road Sign // Russia


istock.com/Nevena1987

Despite what you might think, red cars don't have special priority on this road. This Russian sign tells drivers that the roadway is a two-way road, and the different colors mean no overtaking or passing.

10. Kangaroo Crossing Road Sign // Australia


istock.com/avarooa

Australia is full of cute wildlife that wants to kill you, so watch out when you're driving on the country's highways. There could be a homicidal kangaroo eyeing your Honda.

11. Battlefield Sign // United Kingdom


istock.com/georgeclerk

As much as you might want this one to mean "swords, next left," it really means there's a famous battlefield site up ahead. Like in the United States, brown road signs in the U.K. indicate tourist attractions and historical sites.

12. Coastal Path Sign // Ireland


istock.com/brians101

Yes, it resembles Homer Simpson's hair, but this Irish road sign indicates the Wild Atlantic Way, a 1550-mile walking path along the island's scenic west coast.

13. Camel Crossing Road Sign // Israel


istock.com/cunfek

In the U.S., you might find signs for speed bumps. In Israel, you find signs for bumps in the animals crossing the road.

Florida to Open Its First-Ever Snow Park

Zuberka/iStock via Getty Images
Zuberka/iStock via Getty Images

Millions of tourists flock to Florida each year to ride roller coasters, meet their favorite cartoon characters, and lounge on the beach. The state isn't famous for its winter activities, but that could soon change. As WESH 2 reports, Florida's first-ever snow park is coming to Dade City in 2020.

At Snowcat Ridge, guests will be able to take part in the same snowy fun that's up North. The main attraction of the park will be a 60-foot-tall, 400-foot-long slope packed with snow. A lift will transport visitors to the top of the hill, and from there, they'll use inner tubes to slide back down to ground level. Single, double, and six-person family tubes will be provided to riders.

Guests can also check out the 10,000-square-foot play dome, where they'll use real snow to build snow castles and snow men. The area will even feature a small hill for young visitors who aren't ready for more serious snow-tubing. And because the best part of playing in the snow all day is warming up afterwards, Snowcat Ridge will be home to an Alpine Village, where guests can nibble on snacks and sip cocoa in front of a bonfire.

Dade City is located in Central Florida, an area that hasn't seen snow in nearly 43 years. The arrival of the new park will mark the first time many locals can get a full winter experience close to home.

Snowcat Ridge is expected to open in November 2020.

[h/t WESH 2]

The New York Times's Latest Book on Travel Will Help You Plan the Perfect Weekend Getaway

TASCHEN
TASCHEN

Getting a full sense of a new city while traveling can be tough—especially if you only have a weekend to explore it. But since 2002, The New York Times’s "36 Hours" column has been breaking down destinations all over the world into bite-size pieces, allowing travelers to see the big attractions while still experiencing the city like a local. Now, you can get the best of the column's North American destinations with the fully updated and revised edition of 36 Hours: USA & Canada for $40 at TASCHEN or on Amazon.

Even if you have the original, it’s worth purchasing this updated copy, as this version features 33 new itineraries from Anchorage, Alaska; the Berkshires in Massachusetts; Boulder, Colorado; Miami; Oakland, California; Chattanooga, Tennessee; and many more.

36 Hours: USA & Canda from the New York Times
TASCHEN

The 752-page book also offers more than 5400 hours of travel itineraries, 600 restaurants to dine at, and 450 hotel options. Each city featured includes a brief history, a list of popular destinations, and tips on how to experience it all like a local. For example, the New Orleans guide encourages travelers to start at the French 75 Bar for happy hour and order a Sazerac, a cocktail close to an Old-Fashioned that's a local favorite. Whereas the Miami guide takes you to the Buena Vista Deli, a bistro known for its take on classic French dishes. The travel book also features detailed city maps that pinpoint all the stops, and it's accompanied by nearly 1000 photographs.

Once you've picked your destination, check out some tips on how to craft the perfect itinerary.

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