Determined to Climb Mt. Everest? You May Have to Carry Some Poop

iStock.com/hadynyah
iStock.com/hadynyah

At nearly 5.5 miles high, Mt. Everest’s peak is notoriously hard to climb. The mountain's unforgiving weather, harsh terrain, and high-altitude, low-oxygen "death zone" make it difficult and expensive to retrieve items left behind by those making an ascent. That includes waste and, more gruesomely, the bodies of more than 200 mountaineers who perished at some point along the way.

Many of the bodies end up staying on the mountain, but waste management is somewhat easier to tackle. According to Fodor’s Travel, climbers on the Tibetan side of Mt. Everest are now required to start carrying all of their waste (including the waste their bodies produce naturally). So yes, they’ll have to make room in their backpacks for poop.

These measures aren’t exactly extreme, though. Similar requirements are in place at popular climbing spots in the U.S., like Washington state’s Mt. Rainier and Yosemite’s El Capitan, where climbers have to poop in a bag and bring it back with them.

In addition, climbers without permits are now indefinitely banned from the Tibetan base camp. The lack of tourists will give a team of 200 people space to clean up the mountainside and remove trash, which has become a growing problem in recent years.

These new guidelines were announced by Ci Luo, director of the Chinese Mountaineering Association. Because Mt. Everest straddles the border between Nepal and China, each country manages its own side. About 70 percent of all climbers go through to Nepal, but the popularity of the Tibetan side is growing.

Mountaineer Adrian Ballinger, who has scaled Mt. Everest eight times, lauded the new changes. “Like many of the world's most beautiful places, Mount Everest is at risk of being loved to death,” he wrote in an opinion piece for ABC News. “Too many climbers, too much inexperience, and too many ethically questionable commercial outfitters chasing only profits have led to problems with trash, human waste, and unnecessary accidents, many of which unfairly impact mountain workers like the Sherpa, Tibetans, and other local groups.”

As for the Nepalese side, the government requires climbers to pay a $4000 waste deposit, which gets refunded when they return with at least 18 pounds of waste. By Fodor’s estimates, each person produces about 50 pounds of human waste over the course of a two-month trip.

[h/t Fodor’s Travel]

China Wants to Build Its Own Version of Yellowstone National Park on Tibetan Plateau

Chang Jung Yu/iStock via Getty Images
Chang Jung Yu/iStock via Getty Images

Since being named the nation's first National Park in 1872, Yellowstone has become one of the most iconic sites in America. Now, China is looking to establish its own version of the park. As the Associated Press reports, China is developing a national parks system inspired by the program in the U.S., starting with a preserve partly modeled on Yellowstone.

Sanjiangyuan will be China's first national park and it's expected to debut in 2020. The park sits in the Qinghai province in Western China's Tibetan Plateau, which is home to rapid urban development as well as some of the last truly remote places on Earth. The region also contains many of the last snow leopards living in the wild. Snow leopards are a vulnerable species, and the location for China's pilot park was partly chosen to provide them a safe haven as well protect the 1500 other species of endangered and threatened animals and plants that live within its borders.

Conserving species and natural wonders are the main goals of the country's new parks system. When the plan was in development, Chinese officials visited American sites like Yosemite and Yellowstone to see what a successful national park looks like. They also invited policy makers and scientists from the U.S. and elsewhere to Qinghai province to consult on the project.

China's program won't be an exact replica of what's already been done in the United States, of course. There are currently 128,000 people living in or around the land set to become Sanjiangyuan, and they will continue to reside there when the park opens next year. Officials plan to work with local communities to manage the site; one program called “One Family, One Ranger” hires a member from each local family to be a trash collector or ranger for the park for about $255 a month.

[h/t AP]

5 Clever Ways to Reuse Prescription Bottles

Zadas_Photography/iStock via Getty Images
Zadas_Photography/iStock via Getty Images

Old prescription bottles have a way of accumulating in every drawer and cabinet of a home. During your next cleaning spree, don’t be so quick to toss them in the recycling bin (or the trash can). Those perfectly-good containers have many potential uses beyond their original purpose. From thrifty organizers to gardening projects, here are some clever ways to upcycle empty pill bottles.

1. Organize jewelry.

Tossing your jewelry loose into a box is a recipe for tangled chains and missing valuables. Keep things neat and organized by repurposing your old prescription bottles. If you have enough of them at home, you can designate separate bottles for each type of jewelry you need to store. Now, instead of spending 10 minutes looking for the mate to your favorite earring, you’ll know exactly where you left it.

2. Make travel-size toiletry bottles.

Buying travel-size toiletries is a hassle—and throwing away your full-sized bottles at airport security when you inevitably forget to buy the smaller ones is even more frustrating. Reusing old pill bottles saves you a trip to the drug store. When packing, just squeeze a dollop of your shampoo, conditioner, sunscreen, and whatever other liquid products you need into separate containers. You can customize the amount you need for the length of your trip, and then wash and save the bottles when you get home. But the best part is that you won’t need to wait until you get off the plane to moisturize.

3. Sort coins.

You can’t spend coins when they’re loose in your drawers and the pockets of your winter coat. Old prescription bottles are the perfect size for organizing spare change. Keep a few empty bottles out at home so you can empty your purse and pockets after you walk in the door. You can even use different bottles to separate coins by value, which will make your life easier if you ever get around to rolling those coins and taking them to the bank.

4. Grow seedlings.

An old pill bottle makes a great first home for any plants you’re trying to grow from seeds. Just stuff damp cotton balls into the bottom of the canister, add the seeds, and cover them with a layer of soil. You can even attach a magnet to the side of the bottle to make a decorative mini-planter for your fridge. Once the seedling is big enough, transfer it to a larger home and find new seeds for your upcycled plant container.

5. Store spices.

Do you need matching containers for your dried herbs and spices? Before spending extra money, see if you have any prescription bottles in your medicine cabinet at home. The containers fit snugly onto a spice rack and are just wide enough for you to scoop a tablespoon past the opening. Plus, the same amber plastic designed to protect medications from harsh light is just as effective at protecting spices.

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