Make Homemade Cheese in 48 Hours or Less With Fromaggio

Fromaggio
Fromaggio

Unlike sourdough bread or pickled vegetables, cheese isn't one of those artisan foods that tastes even better when you make it at home. Though some fresh cheeses like ricotta and mozzarella are well-suited to a home kitchen, hard cheeses like cheddar and parmesan traditionally require months of sitting in a temperature-controlled room to develop the right flavor and texture. But a new product on Kickstarter aims to change that. With Fromaggio, you can make hard cheeses on your countertop at home in 48 hours or less.

Fromaggio is a fully-automated cheesemaking machine. To use it, you just need to add your ingredients—milk, culture, and rennet—to the inner chamber and select one of the default cheese options on the touchscreen display. If you don't see the cheese you want to make in the system, you can connect the appliance to the companion app and select a custom cheese recipe from your phone.

Pouring milk into home cheesemaking machine.
Fromaggio

Fromaggio does the rest, from heating the milk and draining the whey to pressing the curds into the right shape. It can churn out almost any type of cheese, including mozzarella, blue cheese, cheddar, feta, Swiss cheese, cream cheese, and provolone. While complex hard cheeses can take up to two days to make, some soft cheeses are ready in as little as 30 minutes.

Pulling cheese out of cheese-making machine.
Fromaggio

If you want to experiment with the flavor of your cheese, you can take it out and age it after Fromaggio has pressed it into a hard block. The system also makes non-cheese dairy products, like yogurt and kefir, and it can cook non-dairy foods like tofu when you use it as a sous vide cooker.

The product's Kickstarter campaign has already raised double its original $50,000 goal (and there's still more than a month left to go). If you want more homemade cheese in your life, you can reserve your Fromaggio with a pledge of $299. It comes with a packet of rennet for an extra $15 and cultures for an additional $30. But even if you pledge today, you'll still have to settle for store-bought cheese for a while; the cheesemaker won't be delivered until March 2020.

Buy it on Kickstarter.

10 Amazing Pieces of Peeps Art

“Edgar Allan Peep” by Christian Twamley / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council
“Edgar Allan Peep” by Christian Twamley / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

Some people paint, some scrapbook, and others create Game of Thrones-inspired dragon sculptures made of 5000 marshmallow Peeps. Candy art may seem like an unusual form of craftsmanship, but it’s more common than you might expect in the lead-up to Easter, when organizations around the country host Peeps art contests.

The aforementioned dragon, as well as the artworks pictured below, were all submitted to the “PEEPshow” contest—a fundraiser for the Carroll County Arts Council in Westminster, Maryland. According to event organizers, the event became the first exhibition of Peeps art when it debuted 12 years ago.

Keep scrolling to see some of the best Peeps sculptures from recent years (2017-2019), and visit the Art Council’s website to see all of this year's participants. (As of Friday afternoon, a Warhol-inspired artwork of "Marilyn Peeproe" appears to be in the lead.)

A space-themed Peeps display
“First Peeps in Space” by International Delight / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A samurai sculpture
"Sugar Samurai" by Tristar Martial Arts / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

The rabbit from Alice in Wonderland
“I’m Late, I’m Late (for the PEEPshow)” by Vivian Davis / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A caterpillar sculpture
“The Very Hungry Caterpeeper” by Lia Finch and M / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A sculpture inspired by a painting
“Peep with the Pearl Earring” by Sandy Oxx / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council


“Edgar Allan Peep” by Christian Twamley / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A Belle sculpture
“Beauty and the Peep” by Candace Birger, Westminster Cake Studio / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

Fish sculpture
“The Rainbow Fish” by Jen, Justin, Connor, and Jacob Myers / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A Gumby sculpture
“Just Gumby” by Sydney Blacksten / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

A sculpture of a monster
“Percy the Purple Peeple Eater” by the Koontz Family / Courtesy of the Carroll County Arts Council

Vlasic Is Working on Pickle Chips Made Entirely of Pickles

iStock.com/bigacis
iStock.com/bigacis

It's easy to find pre-sliced pickle chips in a jar, but if you prefer to eat your snacks out of a bag, your pickle options are limited. Both Doritos and Lays potato chips have released products where pickles are used as flavoring and not the main ingredient. Now, the experts at Vlasic are developing bags of chips that don't just taste like pickles, but are made from real pickle slices, USA Today reports.

Vlasic's parent company Conagra Brands confirmed during a recent investor event that crunchy, snackable chips made entirely of pickles are in the works. Instead of struggling to open a jar every time you crave pickles, you'll be able to eat these chips straight from a bag. They will be vacuum-fried, making them dry and crispy like potato chips.

Vlasic hasn't revealed when the pickle chips will be released, or where they will be available to buy. But according to USA Today, Conagra co-chief operating officer Tom McGough did reveal that they "taste absolutely fantastic."

Can't wait to for Vlasic's pickle chips to arrive in your local grocery store? Here are some products that taste and smell like pickles to try in the meantime.

[h/t USA Today]

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