31 Adorable Slang Terms for Sex From the Last 600 Years

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Getty Images

Lexicographer Jonathon Green’s comprehensive historical dictionary of slang, Green’s Dictionary of Slang, covers hundreds of years of jargon, cant, and naughty talk. He has created a series of online timelines (here and here) where the words too impolite, indecent, or risqué for the usual history books are arranged in the order they came into fashion. (If you don’t see any words on the timelines, zoom out using the bar on the right.) We’ve already had fun with the classiest terms for naughty bits. Here are the most adorable terms for sexual intercourse from the last 600 or so years. Many of them have origins so obscure they hardly make sense at all, but that doesn’t detract from their bawdy adorability in the slightest. When it comes to the ol’ houghmagandy, a little mystery goes a long way.

1. Give someone a green gown (1351)

2. Play nug-a-nug (1505)

3. Play the pyrdewy (1512)

4. Play at couch quail (1521)

5. Ride below the crupper (1578)

6. Board a land carrack (1604)

7. Fadoodling (1611)

8. Put the devil into hell (1616)

9. Night physic (1621)

10. Princum-prancum (1630)

11. Culbatizing exercise (1653)

12. Join paunches (1656)

13. Dance the Paphian jig (1656)

14. Play at tray trip of a die (1660)

15. Dance Barnaby (1664)

16. Shot twixt wind and water (1665)

17. Play at rantum-scantum (1667)

18. Blow off the groundsills (1674)

19. Play hey gammer cook (1674)

20. Join giblets (1680)

21. Play at rumpscuttle and clapperdepouch (1684)

22. Lerricompoop (1694)

23. Ride a dragon upon St. George (1698)

24. Houghmagandy (1700)

25. Pogue the hone (1719)

26. Make feet for children’s stockings (1785)

27. Dance the kipples (1796)

28. Have one’s corn ground (1800)

29. Horizontal refreshment (1863)

30. Arrive at the end of the sentimental journey (1896)

31. Get one’s ashes hauled (1910)

What’s the Difference Between Crocheting and Knitting?

djedzura/iStock via Getty Images
djedzura/iStock via Getty Images

With blustery days officially upon us, the most pressing question about your sweaters, scarves, hats, and mittens is probably: “Are these keeping me warm?” If you’re a DIY enthusiast, or just a detail-oriented person in general, your next question might be: “Were these knitted or crocheted?”

Knitting and crocheting are both calming crafts that involve yarn, produce cozy garments and other items, and can even boost your mental well-being. Having said that, they do have a few specific differences.

To knit, you need needles. The size, material, and number of those needles depends on the project; though most traditional garments are made using two needles, it’s also possible to knit with just one needle, or as many as five. But regardless of the other variables, one or both ends of your knitting needles will always be pointed.

While crocheting calls for a similar long, thin tool that varies in size and material, it has a hooked end—and you only ever need one. According to The Spruce Crafts, even if you hear people refer to the tool as a crochet needle, they’re really talking about a crochet hook.

crotchet hook and garment
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Part of the reason you only use one hook brings us to the next difference between crocheting and knitting: When crocheting, there’s only one “active loop” on your hook at any given time, whereas knitting entails lining up loops down the length of your needles and passing them between needles. The blog Darn Good Yarn explains that since each loop is attached to a long row of stitches, accidentally “dropping” one off the end of your needle might unravel the entire row.

Of course, you have a better chance of avoiding that type of manual error if you’re using a knitting machine or loom, which both exist. Crocheting, on the other hand, has to be done by hand. Since machines can create garments with extremely small stitches, some knit clothes can be much more lightweight or close-fitting than anything you’d be able to crochet—and knitted clothes can also be mass-produced.

When it comes to what the items actually look like, crochet stitches characteristically look more like knots, while knit stitches seem flatter and less bulky. However, materials and techniques have come a long way over the years, and now there’s more crossover between what you’re able to knit and crochet. According to The Spruce Crafts, socks and T-shirts—traditionally both garments that would be knitted—can now technically be crocheted.

knitting needles and garment
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And, believe it or not, knitting and crocheting can even be used to depict complicated mathematical concepts: see what a crocheted hyperbolic plane, Lorenz manifold, and more look like here.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.

Idioms: One or Two?

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