The 100 Most Popular Baby Names of 2018 Have Been Revealed

iStock.com/BorupFoto
iStock.com/BorupFoto

For expectant parents looking for baby name ideas—or clues as to which names to avoid—the Social Security Administration's annual list of the top baby names in the U.S. is a good place to start. The list of the most popular baby names of 2018 includes many familiar favorites as well as some rising stars inspired by pop culture like Game of Thrones.

The name Liam for boys and Emma for girls held the top slots of their respective genders in 2018. Liam first reached No. 1 in 2017, and Emma has dominated for five years in a row. Liam is followed by the popular boy names Noah, William, James, and Oliver, and on the girls' side, Olivia, Ava, Isabella, and Sophia round out the top five.

Looking further down the list reveals some interesting naming trends that emerged last year. As Game of Thrones approached its conclusion, fans showed their love for the show by naming their children after their favorite characters: Khaleesi jumped more than 80 spots from 631 to 549th place, and Arya climbed from 135 to 119. The name Dani also saw a significant spike from 1048 to 945—possibly a nod to Daenerys in more than a few cases.

Star Wars had an impact on the boys' list, with 865 Kylos born last year, as did the Kardashian-West family, with the name Saint branding 859 birth certificates. The Duchess of Sussex likely had something to do with Meghan's rise from 1404 to 703. And though Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor hadn't been born yet, the name Archie for boys ascended from 1170 to 998 last year. The name will likely become even more popular in 2019.

Check out the 2018 rankings for the top 50 boys' names and top 50 girls' names below.

Most Popular Girls' Names in 2018

  1. Emma
  2. Olivia
  3. Ava
  4. Isabella
  5. Sophia
  6. Charlotte
  7. Mia
  8. Amelia
  9. Harper
  10. Evelyn
  11. Abigail
  12. Emily
  13. Elizabeth
  14. Mila
  15. Ella
  16. Avery
  17. Sofia
  18. Camila
  19. Aria
  20. Scarlett
  21. Victoria
  22. Madison
  23. Luna
  24. Grace
  25. Chloe
  26. Penelope
  27. Layla
  28. Riley
  29. Zoey
  30. Nora
  31. Lily
  32. Eleanor
  33. Hannah
  34. Lillian
  35. Addison
  36. Aubrey
  37. Ellie
  38. Stella
  39. Natalie
  40. Zoe
  41. Leah
  42. Hazel
  43. Violet
  44. Aurora
  45. Savannah
  46. Audrey
  47. Brooklyn
  48. Bella
  49. Claire
  50. Skylar

Most Popular Boys' Names in 2018

  1. Liam
  2. Noah
  3. William
  4. James
  5. Oliver
  6. Benjamin
  7. Elijah
  8. Lucas
  9. Mason
  10. Logan
  11. Alexander
  12. Ethan
  13. Jacob
  14. Michael
  15. Daniel
  16. Henry
  17. Jackson
  18. Sebastian
  19. Aiden
  20. Matthew
  21. Samuel
  22. David
  23. Joseph
  24. Carter
  25. Owen
  26. Wyatt
  27. John
  28. Jack
  29. Luke
  30. Jayden
  31. Dylan
  32. Grayson
  33. Levi
  34. Isaac
  35. Gabriel
  36. Julian
  37. Mateo
  38. Anthony
  39. Jaxon
  40. Lincoln
  41. Joshua
  42. Christopher
  43. Andrew
  44. Theodore
  45. Caleb
  46. Ryan
  47. Asher
  48. Nathan
  49. Thomas
  50. Leo

This Course Will Teach You How to Play Guitar Like a Pro for $29

BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images
BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images

Be honest: You’ve watched a YouTube video or two in an attempt to learn how to play a song on the guitar. Whether it was through tabs or simply copying whatever you saw on the screen, the fun always ends when friends start throwing out requests for songs you have no idea how to play. So how about you actually learn how to play guitar for real this time?

It’s now possible to learn guitar from home with the Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle, which is currently on sale for $29. Grab that Gibson, Fender, or whatever you have handy, and learn to strum rhythms from scratch.

The strumming course will teach you how to count beats and rests to turn your hands and fingers into the perfect accompaniment for your own voice or other musicians. Then, you can take things a step further and learn advanced jamming and soloing to riff anytime, anywhere. This course will teach you to improvise across various chords and progressions so you can jump into any jam with something original. You’ll also have the chance to dive deep into the major guitar genres of bluegrass, blues, and jazz. Lessons in jam etiquette, genre history, and how to read music will separate you from a novice player.

This bundle also includes courses in ear training so you can properly identify any relative note, interval, or pitch. That way, you can play along with any song when it comes on, or even understand how to modify it into the key you’d prefer. And when the time comes to perform, be prepared with skilled hammer-ons, pull-offs, slides, bends, trills, vibrato, and fret-tapping. Not only will you learn the basic foundations of guitar, you’ll ultimately be able to develop your own style with the help of these lessons.

The Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle is discounted for a limited time. Act on this $29 offer now to work on those fingertip calluses and play like a pro.

 

The Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle - $29

See Deal


At Mental Floss, we only write about the products we love and want to share with our readers, so all products are chosen independently by our editors. Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a percentage of any sale made from the links on this page. Prices and availability are accurate as of the time of publication.

Why Did Noon Used to Mean 3 p.m.?

3 p.m. is basically noon for people who wake up at 12 p.m.
3 p.m. is basically noon for people who wake up at 12 p.m.
Mckyartstudio/iStock via Getty Images

If you’re a late sleeper, you might find yourself thinking 12 p.m. seems way too early to be considered midday, and the word noon would much better describe, say, 3 p.m. It turns out that ancient Romans would have agreed with you, if only for etymological reasons.

As Reader’s Digest explains, the days in ancient Rome were split into four periods of three hours each. The first hour was at sunrise around 6 a.m.—called prime, for first—followed by 9 a.m. (terce, denoting the third hour), 12 p.m. (sext, for sixth), and 3 p.m. (none, for ninth).

According to Merriam-Webster, Middle and Old English borrowed the time-keeping tradition, along with the Latin word for ninth, which was changed to nōn and eventually noon. Though we’re not sure exactly when or why noon started referring to 12 p.m. instead of 3 p.m., it could have something to do with Christian prayer traditions. In the Bible, Jesus’s crucifixion is said to have taken place at the ninth hour, and that’s when worshippers partook in their second of three daily prayers; the others were in the morning and evening. It’s possible that hungry monks were behind noon’s gradual shift from 3 p.m. to 12 p.m.—since their daily fast didn’t end until after the midday prayer, they had a built-in motive for moving it earlier.

While we didn’t exactly stay true to the original Latin meaning of noon, there’s another important remnant of ancient Rome hiding in the way we tell time today. Romans referred to 12 p.m. as meridiem, for midday, and so do we. A.M. is an abbreviation for ante meridiem, or before midday, and P.M. means post meridiem, or after midday.

Have you got a Big Question you'd like us to answer? If so, let us know by emailing us at bigquestions@mentalfloss.com.