Delaware Becomes the First State to Achieve ‘No-Kill’ Status for Its Animal Shelters

fortise/iStock via Getty Images
fortise/iStock via Getty Images

If you just don’t have enough room in your home to adopt one more stray cat or dog you see wandering your neighborhood streets, take it to Delaware. The small, oceanside state just became the first no-kill shelter state in the U.S., CNN reports.

The recognition was announced by Best Friends Animal Society, an animal welfare organization that works with shelters across the nation to help them care for animals without resorting to euthanization. In order to qualify for the no-kill designation, a state must achieve a 90 percent save rate for all shelter dogs and cats; in other words, Delaware hasn’t passed any legislation to ban killing shelter animals, but instead is actively working to keep their statewide save rate at 90 percent (or above).

Why not 100 percent? Best Friends acknowledges that sometimes, euthanasia is still the kindest option for some former strays who are beyond rehabilitation. “Animals may still be euthanized humanely if they are irredeemably sick or injured,” the website states. “But they are not killed in order to make space for more animals.”

Brandywine Valley SPCA, an organization with shelter locations in Pennsylvania and Delaware, shared the news across social media last week, and marketing director Linda Torelli explained to CNN why the organization considered it a personal victory.

“Within Delaware, we intake more than 60 percent of the animals entering shelters and more than four times the next largest shelter,” Torelli said. “So our policies have had a significant impact on the state becoming no-kill.” That’s more than 14,000 animals, she added, with a save rate of 95 percent. They accomplish it mostly through mega adoption events, neuter and spaying programs for cats to make them more easily adoptable, low-cost veterinary clinics, education programs, and behavioral training programs for dogs.

Delaware is the first state in what Best Friends Animal Society hopes will be a long, steady line of states that will rise to this new standard. According to its website, the organization hopes to achieve a 90 percent save rate nationwide by 2025. You can find out what your state’s numbers look like here.

If you think you might have a little extra room in your house (and your heart) for a new companion, let these 25 benefits of adopting a shelter dog be the friendly push that you need.

[h/t CNN]

The ChopBox Smart Cutting Board Has a Food Scale, Timer, and Knife Sharper Built Right Into It

ChopBox
ChopBox

When it comes to furnishing your kitchen with all of the appliances necessary to cook night in and night out, you’ll probably find yourself running out of counter space in a hurry. The ChopBox, which is available on Indiegogo and dubs itself “The World’s First Smart Cutting Board,” looks to fix that by cramming a bunch of kitchen necessities right into one cutting board.

In addition to giving you a knife-resistant bamboo surface to slice and dice on, the ChopBox features a built-in digital scale that weighs up to 6.6 pounds of food, a nine-hour kitchen timer, and two knife sharpeners. It also sports a groove on its surface to catch any liquid runoff that may be produced by the food and has a second pull-out cutting board that doubles as a serving tray.

There’s a 254nm UVC light featured on the board, which the company says “is guaranteed to kill 99.99% of germs and bacteria" after a minute of exposure. If you’re more of a traditionalist when it comes to cleanliness, the ChopBox is completely waterproof (but not dishwasher-safe) so you can wash and scrub to your heart’s content without worry. 

According to the company, a single one-hour charge will give you 30 days of battery life, and can be recharged through a Micro USB port.

The ChopBox reached its $10,000 crowdfunding goal just 10 minutes after launching its campaign, but you can still contribute at different tiers. Once it’s officially released, the ChopBox will retail for $200, but you can get one for $100 if you pledge now. You can purchase the ChopBox on Indiegogo here.

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A Prehistoric Great White Shark Nursery Has Been Discovered in Chile

Great white sharks used prehistoric nurseries to protect their young.
Great white sharks used prehistoric nurseries to protect their young.
solarseven/iStock via Getty Images

Great white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) may be one of the most formidable and frightening apex predators on the planet today, but life for them isn’t as easy as horror movies would suggest. Due to a slow growth rate and the fact that they produce few offspring, the species is listed as vulnerable to extinction.

There is a way these sharks ensure survival, and that is by creating nurseries—a designated place where great white shark babies (called pups) are protected from other predators. Now, researchers at the University of Vienna and colleagues have discovered these nurseries occurred in prehistoric times.

In a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, Jamie A. Villafaña from the university’s Institute of Palaeontology describes a fossilized nursery found in Coquimbo, Chile. Researchers were examining a collection of fossilized great white shark teeth between 5 and 2 million years old along the Pacific coast of Chile and Peru when they noticed a disproportionate number of young shark teeth in Coquimbo. There was also a total lack of sexually mature animals' teeth, which suggests the site was used primarily by pups and juveniles as a nursery.

Though modern great whites are known to guard their young in designated areas, the researchers say this is the first example of a paleo-nursery. Because the climate was much warmer when the paleo-nursery was in use, the researchers think these protective environments can deepen our understanding of how great white sharks can survive global warming trends.