8 Facts About Tom Selleck On His 75th Birthday

Vince Bucci, Getty Images
Vince Bucci, Getty Images

Aside from Sam Elliot, no actor may be more renowned for their mustache than Tom Selleck. The former star of Magnum, P.I., 1987’s Three Men and a Baby, and the long-running CBS hit Blue Bloods turns 75 on January 29, 2020. While you likely know he was once up for the role of Indiana Jones, there’s quite a bit more to Selleck’s life and career. Take a look at some lesser-known facts, including Selleck's military service and the time he suited up for the Detroit Tigers.

1. Tom Selleck was once on The Dating Game.

Born on January 29, 1945 in Detroit, Michigan, Tom Selleck grew up in Los Angeles and earned a basketball scholarship to the University of Southern California, where he also entered a management training program for United Airlines. While he was a talented athlete, Selleck was more interested in the performing arts. Selleck worked as a model and was later able to secure commercial spots, including one for Safeguard deodorant, where co-star Teri Garr announced, “He smells just the way a man should smell—clean.” Prior to his commercial success, in 1965, he appeared on The Dating Game, at the time a popular way for aspiring actors to gain exposure. (Steve Martin, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Andy Kaufman all made appearances.) Despite his future status as a screen hunk, Selleck lost on the show—twice.

2. Tom Selleck served in the military.

Selleck was drafted during the Vietnam War. He joined the California National Guard in 1967 and was placed in the 160th Infantry Regiment, achieving the rank of sergeant and serving until 1973. At the time, Selleck was under contract with Fox. After serving full-time for six months, he returned home in 1969 and found out the studio had fired him. Later, Selleck was used in promotional material for the National Guard and has been a spokesman for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund.

3. Tom Selleck got a big break courtesy of Mae West.

Though he would continue to film television commercials throughout the 1970s, Selleck’s first major big-screen role came courtesy of Mae West. The legendary actress hand-picked Selleck to play one of her “studs” in 1970’s Myra Breckinridge. Selleck credited West with helping him get noticed. “Mae was a wonderful woman,” Selleck told The Morning Call in 1997. “I escorted her to a couple of premieres and she did hundreds of interviews where she mentioned me in the same sentence as Cary Grant.”

4. It turns out that Magnum, P.I. wouldn’t have kept Tom Selleck from playing Indiana Jones.

Tom Selleck stars in 'Magnum, P.I.'
Tom Selleck as Thomas Magnum in Magnum, P.I.
CBS

One of the most notable bits of trivia in Selleck’s career is that he auditioned to play globe-trotting archaeologist Indiana Jones in 1981’s Raiders of the Lost Ark, got the job, but was forced to turn it down because CBS wouldn’t let him out of his contract to star in the private eye drama Magnum, P.I. That’s accurate, though it turns out that Selleck could actually have done both. Just as Magnum, P.I. was about to start shooting in Hawaii, a writer’s strike held up production, and Selleck was forced to work as a handyman to pay his rent until the show resumed. To add insult to injury, Raiders started filming around the same time—in Hawaii.

One lesser-known but intriguing bit of Selleck trivia is that Selleck turned down the lead role in 1985’s Witness, a drama about a cop who befriends an Amish family, which went on to star Harrison Ford.

5. Tom Selleck initially “hated” the role of Thomas Magnum.

When Selleck was offered the role of Thomas Magnum, he had already been in a string of failed television pilots. While a starring role in a big network show was welcome, Selleck told GQ in 2014 that he initially disliked how the role had been written. “I hated it,” he said. “He was James Bond-like. He was perfect. He had girls on each arm. He owned a Ferrari.” Selleck wanted to play a character more in line with the downtrodden Jim Rockford in The Rockford Files, in which he had guest-starred. Producers agreed, and Magnum became more of an Everyman character. The series ran for eight seasons.

6. Tom Selleck once played for the Detroit Tigers.

Fans of Magnum, P.I. noted that Selleck was fond of wearing a Detroit Tigers baseball cap throughout the series, a nod to his birthplace. The actor is such a fan of the team that he joined spring training in 1991 as part of his preparation for a role as a baseball pro in 1992’s Mr. Baseball. Selleck even played in one exhibition game against the Cincinnati Reds that April, striking out in the eighth inning.

7. Tom Selleck is an accomplished volleyball player.

Tom Selleck visits the SiriusXM Studios on October 15, 2015 in New York City
Ilya S. Savenok/Getty Images

While filming Magnum P.I., Selleck often played volleyball with members of the Outrigger Canoe Club senior (over 35) team in Honolulu and was even named honorary captain of the U.S. Olympic men’s team in 1984. Selleck agreed to pose shirtless for a poster because the proceeds went to the athletes.

8. Tom Selleck was offered the David Hasselhoff role on Baywatch.

After wrapping up Magnum, P.I., Selleck pursued a film career, including films like 1989’s Her Alibi and 1990’s Quigley Down Under. He was offered a return to television in the form of Baywatch, the NBC series about lifeguards. Selleck passed on the role of Mitch Buchannon, which eventually went to David Hasselhoff. Selleck returned to series television with a recurring guest spot on Friends and the police drama Blue Bloods, which is now in its 10th season.

6 Protective Mask Bundles You Can Get On Sale

pinkomelet/iStock via Getty Images Plus
pinkomelet/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Daily life has changed immeasurably since the onset of COVID-19, and one of the ways people have had to adjust is by wearing protective masks out in public places, including in parks and supermarkets. These are an essential part of fighting the spread of the virus, and there are plenty of options for you depending on what you need, whether your situation calls for disposable masks to run quick errands or the more long-lasting KN95 model if you're going to work. Check out some options you can pick up on sale right now.

1. Cotton Face Masks; $20 for 4

Protective Masks with Patterns.
Triple7Deals

This four-pack of washable cotton face masks comes in tie-dye, kids patterns, and even a series of mustache patterns, so you can do your part to mask germs without also covering your personality.

Buy it: $20 for four (50 percent off)

2. CE- and FDA-Approved KN95 Mask; $50 for 10

A woman putting on a protective mask.
BetaFresh

You’ve likely heard about the N95 face mask and its important role in keeping frontline workers safe. Now, you can get a similar model for yourself. The KN95 has a dual particle layer, which can protect you from 99 percent of particles in the air and those around you from 70 percent of the particles you exhale. Nose clips and ear straps provide security and comfort, giving you some much-needed peace of mind.

Buy it: $50 for 10 (50 percent off)

3. Three-Ply Masks; $13 for 10

Woman wearing a three-ply protective mask.
XtremeTime

These three-ply, non-medical, non-woven face masks provide a moisture-proof layer against your face with strong filtering to keep you and everyone around you safe. The middle layer filters non-oily particles in the air and the outer layer works to block visible objects, like droplets.

Buy it: $13 for 10 (50 percent off)

4. Disposable masks; $44 for 50

A batch of disposable masks.
Odash, Inc.

If the thought of reusing the same mask from one outing to the next makes you feel uneasy, there’s a disposable option that doesn’t compromise quality; in fact, it uses the same three-layered and non-woven protection as other masks to keep you safe from airborne particles. Each mask in this pack of 50 can be worn safely for up to 10 hours. Once you're done, safely dispose of it and start your next outing with a new one.

Buy it: $44 for 50 (41 percent off)

5. Polyester Masks; $22 for 5

Polyester protective masks.
Triple7Deals

These masks are a blend of 95 percent polyester and 5 percent spandex, and they work to block particles from spreading in the air. And because they're easily compressed, they can travel with you in your bag or pocket, whether you're going to work or out to the store.

Buy it: $22 for five (56 percent off)

6. Mask Protector Cases; $15 for 3

Protective mask case.
Triple7Deals

You're going to need to have a stash of masks on hand for the foreseeable future, so it's a good idea to protect the ones you’ve got. This face mask protector case is waterproof and dust-proof to preserve your mask as long as possible.

Buy it: $15 for three (50 percent off)

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16 Priceless Treasures We've Lost Forever

jeanyfan, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain
jeanyfan, Wikimedia Commons // Public Domain

Steven Spielberg is known for crafting such masterpieces as Jaws, E.T., Schindler's List, and Jurassic Park. With such a long and acclaimed film career, it probably wouldn't surprise anyone to learn that Spielberg got his start behind the camera at just 17 years old when (with the help of his friends and his high school marching band) he directed his first feature-length film, Firelight.

What's that? You've never seen Firelight? Well, you're certainly not alone; sadly, just under four minutes of the original footage remains. After screening Firelight for around 500 people, the young director sent a few of the film reels off to a producer for review. When the budding director later went back to retrieve his film, he discovered that the producer had been fired—and his movie had vanished.

Firelight is just one example of the many priceless items that have disappeared from history. On this episode of The List Show, we're rediscovering all sort of treasures—from writing by Ernest Hemingway to natural landmarks—that have been lost to time (or circumstance). You can watch the full episode below.

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