100 of the Most Commonly Misspelled Words in the English Language

She's having a dilemma about how to spell dilemma.
She's having a dilemma about how to spell dilemma.
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Since many apps and programs now come with built-in spellcheckers to catch pesky errors—and even correct them automatically—you’re less likely to be embarrassed if you always forget how to spell embarrass.

You’re also not alone. Lexico used data from the Oxford English Corpus, which monitors the usage of more than 2 billion English words, to compile a list of 100 most commonly misspelled words. Embarrass is one of them; people have trouble remembering that it has two r’s, writing it as embarass instead.

Of all the words on the list, more than two dozen have common misspellings related to double letters. For some of those entries, people seem to know there’s a double letter somewhere in the word, but they often choose the wrong letter to repeat—Caribbean, for example, is often spelled Carribean, and bizarre becomes bizzare. Others have multiple double letters, and people accidentally omit one, like missing the second t in committee or the second n in millennium.

Double letters aren’t the only recurring issue on this list. The old “i before e except after c” mnemonic rhyme hasn’t stuck for everyone; the two vowels are often mistakenly swapped in achieve, believe, friend, piece, receive, and siege. As a testament to how frustrating the English language can be, the words weird and foreign, two of the (many) exceptions to the “i before e” rule, are often misspelled as wierd and foriegn.

Another common vocalic blunder involves a’s and e’s in suffixes. It’s appearance, not appearence; calendar, not calender; and tendency, not tendancy. There aren’t always obvious mnemonic devices to help you keep these straight, but Reader’s Digest suggests exclaiming “Eeek!” whenever you need to remember that cemetery has three e’s and no a’s.

See all 100 words—with the correct spelling listed first, and the common misspelling listed after it—below. And if you’re not the greatest speller, don’t worry; neither were Jane Austen, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and these 9 other historical figures.

  1. accommodate // accomodate
  1. achieve // acheive
  1. across // accross
  1. aggressive // agressive
  1. apparently // apparantly
  1. appearance // appearence
  1. argument // arguement
  1. assassination // assasination
  1. basically // basicly
  1. beginning // begining
  1. believe // beleive, belive
  1. bizarre // bizzare
  1. business // buisness
  1. calendar // calender
  1. Caribbean // Carribean
  1. cemetery // cemetary
  1. chauffeur // chauffer
  1. colleague // collegue
  1. coming // comming
  1. committee // commitee
  1. completely // completly
  1. conscious // concious
  1. curiosity // curiousity
  1. definitely // definately
  1. dilemma // dilemna
  1. disappear // dissapear
  1. disappoint // dissapoint
  1. ecstasy // ecstacy
  1. embarrass // embarass
  1. environment // enviroment
  1. existence // existance
  1. Fahrenheit // Farenheit
  1. familiar // familar
  1. finally // finaly
  1. fluorescent // florescent
  1. foreign // foriegn
  1. foreseeable // forseeable
  1. forty // fourty
  1. forward // foward
  1. friend // freind
  1. further // futher
  1. gist // jist
  1. glamorous // glamourous
  1. government // goverment
  1. guard // gaurd
  1. happened // happend
  1. harass // harrass
  1. honorary // honourary
  1. humorous // humourous
  1. idiosyncrasy // idiosyncracy
  1. immediately // immediatly
  1. incidentally // incidently
  1. independent // independant
  1. interrupt // interupt
  1. irresistible // irresistable
  1. knowledge // knowlege
  1. liaise // liase
  1. lollipop // lollypop
  1. millennium // millenium
  1. Neanderthal // Neandertal
  1. necessary // neccessary
  1. noticeable // noticable
  1. occasion // ocassion
  1. occurred // occured
  1. occurrence // occurance, occurence
  1. pavilion // pavillion
  1. persistent // persistant
  1. pharaoh // pharoah
  1. piece // peice
  1. politician // politican
  1. Portuguese // Portugese
  1. possession // posession
  1. preferred // prefered
  1. propaganda // propoganda
  1. publicly // publically
  1. really // realy
  1. receive // recieve
  1. referred // refered
  1. religious // religous
  1. remember // rember, remeber
  1. resistance // resistence
  1. sense // sence
  1. separate // seperate
  1. siege // seige
  1. successful // succesful
  1. supersede // supercede
  1. surprise // suprise
  1. tattoo // tatoo
  1. tendency // tendancy
  1. therefore // therefor
  1. threshold // threshhold
  1. tomorrow // tommorow, tommorrow
  1. tongue // tounge
  1. truly // truely
  1. unforeseen // unforseen
  1. unfortunately // unfortunatly
  1. until // untill
  1. weird // wierd
  1. wherever // whereever
  1. which // wich

[h/t Lexico]

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What Is a Scuttlebutt, and Why Do We Like to Hear It?

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Casual conversation is home to a variety of prompts. You might ask someone how they’re doing, what’s new, or if they’ve done anything interesting recently. Sometimes, you can ask them what the scuttlebutt is. “What’s the scuttlebutt?” you’d say, for example, and then they’d reply with the solicited scuttlebutt.

We can easily infer that scuttlebutt is a slang term for information or maybe even gossip. But what exactly is scuttlebutt, and why did it become associated with idle water cooler talk?

According to Merriam-Webster, a scuttlebutt referred to a cask on sailing ships in the 1800s that contained drinking water for those on board. It was later used as the name of the drinking fountain found on a ship or in a Naval installation. The cask was known as a butt, while scuttle was taken from the French word escoutilles and means hatch or hole. A scuttlebutt was therefore a hatch in the cask.

Because sailors usually received orders from shouting supervisors, talking amongst themselves was discouraged. Since sailors could congregate around the fountain, it became a place to finally catch up and exchange gossip, making scuttlebutt synonymous with casual conversation. The scuttlebutt was really the only place to do it.

Nautical technology made the scuttlebutt obsolete, but the term endured, becoming a catch-all word for unfounded rumors.

The next time someone asks you what the scuttlebutt is, now you can tell them.

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