15 of the World's Most Expensive Cheeses

istock collage
istock collage

There's so much more to the wonderful world of cheese than your typical grocery store brick would suggest. Thousands of artisan cheeses around the world are produced via their own intricate and labor-intensive processes, which create complex and stunning flavor profiles. There are many wonderful American-made and imported fine cheeses that won't break the bank … but none of those are going to appear on this list. Below are 15 of the world's most expensive cheeses. Many are incredibly rare; their decadent ingredients make them a fromage fiend's dream (but your wallet's worst nightmare), and give the term "indulgence" a whole new meaning. 

1. Beaufort D'Ete // $45 per pound

Also known as the Prince of Gruyères, this alpine hunk is the stuff that fondue dreams are made of. Produced from raw cow’s milk, this melts perfectly on anything and has a hazelnut finish. It’s also been around for centuries.

2. Gorau Glas // $20 to $40 per pound

This won a Gold British Cheese award in 2002 and was acknowledged as the priciest British cheese out there. It’s a soft, small batch blue that is made using a labor-intensive process in Wales. 

3. Rogue River Blue // $40 to $50 per pound

Truly the crown of Oregon, Rogue River Blue is a smoky, creamy blue that’s been aged in pear brandy-soaked grape leaves. Not only are its ingredients divine, it is also very seasonal as it’s made from raw summer’s milk (hence its hefty price tag).

4. Winnimere // $30 to $45 per pound

Kate, Flickr // CC BY 2.0

This ooey gooey wonder won Best of Show at the 2013 American Cheese Society conference. When it comes to expensive cheese, this one is actually relatively affordable. One spruce-wrapped wheel costs about $45 and includes the wintry seasonal flavors of berries, smoked meat, and forest.

5. Cacio Bufala // $45 per pound

Buffalo’s milk has around twice the fat of cow’s milk, so it produces some of the creamiest cheese in the world. This cheese is made with time-tested techniques and aged 8-12 months in the caves of Casa Madaio. It has a delicate, buttery flavor and melts in your mouth.

6. Jersey Blue // $40 to $45 per pound

Originally from the UK, Jersey cows produce milk with a very high level of butterfat content, which makes this cheese, manufactured in Switzerland, especially fudgy and creamy in texture. The blue bite is balanced out by the raw milk's earthy flavor.

7. Epoisses by Germain // $45 per pound

It might be one of the stinkiest cheeses on the planet, but it’s also one of the most famous. Don’t let the stench fool you: inside the orange-washed rind is a runny masterpiece that tastes like the earth it was made from. This particular wheel is rinsed with Marc de Bourgogne, which is a brandy made from nearby vineyards in France.

8. Lord of the Hundreds // $15 to $20 per pound

Lord of the Hundreds hails from East Sussex and is made from local sheep’s milk. Like many sheep’s milk cheeses, it is slightly dry and sharp, but has an overall nutty flavor. It is rustic, approachable, and made by people who really know their cheese.

9. Old Ford // $50 per pound

This firm, earthy beauty has elegant floral notes and just the right amount of bite. Since goats yield far less milk than cows do, their cheese is often made fresh and young. However, Old Ford is aged and pressed to perfection by hand. It’s time and labor-intensive, but totally worth it.

10. Caciocavallo Podolico // $50 per pound

Though the name translates to “Horse Cheese” in Italian, it’s actually made from the milk of a very rare breed of cow called the Podolica. The cows also happen to munch on wild strawberries, blueberries, cherries, and more, which give the cheese its distinct flavor.

11. Extra Old Bitto // $150 per pound

China is the place for some of the world’s most expensive and oldest cheeses. The Bitto was purchased by a Hong Kong importer and was made in 1997. Since most Bitto is aged for 10 years, this particular stock is extra rare.

12. Wyke Farms Cheddar // $200 per pound

Cheddar is a classic, a staple of any pantry. It makes sandwiches taste better, pairs perfectly with most beers and wines, and is the perfect snack. Wyke Farms turned one of the most traditional cheeses into something extraordinary by infusing it with gold leaf and white truffle.

13. White Stilton Gold // $450 per pound

This is as opulent as it gets. The folks at Long Clawson Dairy first made this cheese for the Christmas season, and it's now a favorite among celebs. It’s made with real gold flakes and gold liqueur.

14. Moose Cheese // $455 per pound

To find cheese that’s worth nearly $500/lb, you’ll have to go to Bjursholm, Sweden and visit the Elk House, which is the only place in the world that makes moose cheese. In fact, the cheese is made from three domesticated moose named Gullan, Haelga, and Juna. Together they yield about 600 pounds of cheese per year.

15. Pule // $576 per pound

This crumbly delicacy comes from Serbia and isn't made from the milk of a cow, goat, sheep, or buffalo ... it comes from a donkey. It takes 25 liters of donkey milk just to make one kilogram of cheese.

Hurry—Starbucks Is Giving Away Free Coffee Today!

Starbucks
Starbucks

If Daylight Saving Time's cruel theft of those precious autumn sunlight hours is making you crave more caffeine than usual, you’re in luck: Starbucks is blessing us with a buy-one-get-one-free deal this afternoon.

Thrillist reports that you can claim your free drink with the purchase of any handcrafted coffee beverage, grande-sized or larger, between 2 p.m. and 7 p.m today. You’ll have to download the Starbucks app in order to access the deal, but you don’t have to be a member of the rewards program. If you’re planning on nabbing your two coffees today, however, now might be a good time to register—it’s free, and you’ll earn stars on your purchase that’ll count towards another eventual free beverage or food item.

Though Starbucks holds these “Happy Hour” opportunities every so often, the deals themselves vary. Sometimes, for example, all handcrafted beverages are half off, and other times the offer only applies to blended Frappuccino beverages.

According to the terms listed in the app, today’s BOGO bargain doesn’t include regular hot coffee, hot tea, ready-to-drink beverages (like juices or other bottled drinks), or Starbucks Reserve drinks.

It does, however, include the internationally esteemed pumpkin spice latte, as well as the recently returned lineup of irresistible holiday drinks: peppermint mocha, toasted white chocolate mocha, caramel brulée latte, chestnut praline latte, and eggnog latte.

starbucks holiday drinks
Starbucks

If you happen to have a child in tow (or you’re just not hooked on caffeine), hot chocolate makes an ideal after-school treat, and Starbucks has an impressive five flavors to choose from: traditional, peppermint, toasted white chocolate, regular white chocolate, and salted caramel.

And when you do visit the café today or any other day, remember to be kind to the barista … or else they might swap out your drink for a decaffeinated one. Here are 11 other secrets from Starbucks employees.

[h/t Thrillist]

The Great Tryptophan Lie: Eating Turkey Does Not Make You Tired

H. Armstrong Roberts/iStock via Getty Images
H. Armstrong Roberts/iStock via Getty Images

While you’re battling your cousins for the best napping spot after Thanksgiving dinner, feel free to use this as a diversion tactic: It’s a myth that eating turkey makes you tired.

It’s true that turkey contains L-Tryptophan, an amino acid involved in sleep. Your body uses it to produce a B vitamin called niacin, which generates the neurotransmitter serotonin, which yields the hormone melatonin, which helps regulate your sleeping patterns. However, plenty of other common foods contain comparable levels of tryptophan, including other poultry, meat, cheese, yogurt, fish, and eggs.

Furthermore, in order for tryptophan to produce serotonin in your brain, it first has to make it across the blood-brain barrier, which many other amino acids are also trying to do. To give tryptophan a leg up in the competition, it needs the help of carbohydrates. Registered dietitian Elizabeth Somer tells WebMD that the best way to boost serotonin is to eat a small, all-carbohydrate snack a little while after you’ve eaten something that contains tryptophan, and the carbs will help ferry the tryptophan from your bloodstream to your brain.

But Thanksgiving isn’t exactly about eating small, well-timed snacks. It’s more about heaps of potatoes, mountains of stuffing, and generous globs of gravy—and that, along with alcohol, is more likely the reason you collapse into a spectacular food coma after your meal. Overeating (especially of foods high in fat) means your body has to work extra hard to digest everything. To get the job done, it redirects blood to the digestive system, leaving little energy for anything else. And since alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, it also slows down your brain and other organs.

In short, you can still hold turkey responsible for your Thanksgiving exhaustion, but you should make sure it knows it can share the blame with the homestyle mac and cheese, spiked apple cider, and second piece of pumpkin pie.

[h/t WebMD]

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