15 of the World’s Most Bike-Friendly Cities

istock
istock

Biking is a great way to stay active and reduce your carbon footprint. Here are some cities that are actively encouraging this green mode of transportation. 

1. COPENHAGEN, DENMARK 

Copenhagen is often considered the most bike-friendly city in the world. Tourists are often overwhelmed by the number of bicycles flying by, and children are taught to ride before they’re even old enough to go to school. Thanks to bicycle-friendly measures taken by the city, nearly half of all Copenhageners commute to work by bike, and 35 percent of all people who work in Copenhagen—those who live in the suburbs included—commute on their bicycles. Cyclists enjoy 390 kilometers (about 242 miles) of designated bike lanes, and Greater Copenhagen now has a “Cycle Super Highway” which connects the city to the town of Albertslund with plenty of amenities along the way, like air pumps, safer intersections, and traffic lights timed to average cycling speed to minimize stopping.

2. AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS 

You can’t really experience Amsterdam without taking a spin on a bicycle. There are over 800,000 bicycles in Amsterdam, which means there are more bikes than people. The relatively flat streets often filled with bicycles: People use them to go to work, drop children at school, and cart around groceries. If you’re visiting, there are plenty of places for tourists to rent a bicycle and start exploring, not to mention guided tours and illustrated booklets intended to help newcomers learn how to get around efficiently. 

3. PORTLAND, OREGON 

It’s hard to beat Europe in terms of bicycle-friendliness, but Portland is trying its best. The Portland Bureau of Transportation is slowly making improvements to help citizens and tourists safely get around safely on two wheels. Cyclists can snag free printed city and neighborhood maps, safety information, and more to help better navigate when visiting. There’s also a public bike rental system that’s considered one of the greenest in the world; they’ve managed to cut down the need for excess kiosks by utilizing pre-existing bike corrals. The city offers other amenities, too, including bike lockers, bike riding classes, and etiquette guides. 

4. BOULDER, COLORADO

Boulder’s residents already have a reputation for their love of the outdoors, so it makes sense that cycling would be a popular way to get around. The city’s 300 miles of bikeways include on-street bike lanes, contra-flow bike lanes, designated bike routes, paved shoulders, multi-use paths, and soft-surface paths. There’s also a bike registration program to help protect bicycles from theft. 

5. MONTREAL, CANADA 

The bustling Canadian city of Montreal has an impressive 600 kilometres (about 373 miles) of bike paths—almost twice as many as Copenhagen. In the spring, cyclists take to these designated paths, making pit stops along the way at various food and drink stands. What’s more, each year the city hosts a bike festival, welcoming bikers of all ages and skill levels to take a tour around town. 

6. TOKYO, JAPAN 

About 14 percent of all commuters in Tokyo are bicycle riders. While that may seem paltry compared to Copenhagen’s impressive 50 percent, it’s impressive considering how large and dense Tokyo actually is. Those who choose to hop on a bike can enjoy ample parking, lots of bike paths, and cycling tours. Japan is also known for making wonderfully constructed bicycles that stand the test of time. 

7. RIO DE JANIERO, BRAZIL 

Rio got on board with bicycles in 1992, which is when they first started building bike lanes. Today, the city has a thriving cyclist population. Their new bike-sharing program boasts 60 stations and 600 bicycles distributed throughout the city. Bike Rio offers monthly passes for R$ 10,00 (that’s about $2.50 in U.S. dollars), allowing residents and visitors unlimited access to the program’s bikes. On the weekends, riders can take a trip on one of the beach avenues for a lovely view of the water as they ride. 

8. STRASBOURG, FRANCE 

The little city of Strasbourg is a great place to bike—mainly because it’s really, really pretty. Eight percent of the city’s population currently rides a bicycle, but the city is working hard to get that number up. They aim to double the number of cyclists by 2025. 

9. BARCELONA, SPAIN 

Barcelona is taking baby steps towards becoming a more hospitable place for bikers. They continue to expand their system of bike paths, and their bike share program is one of the most frequently used in the world. Bicycle safety is also a huge priority: city officials have recently instituted measures intended to slow car traffic. If you’re just visiting, there are a number of different bike tours you can sign up for—and plenty of scenic paths that pass right by the water. 

10. BUDAPEST, HUNGARY 

Residents of Budapest can currently get around town on 200 kilometers (124 miles) of cycling paths, which bring riders through the center city or in and around its many stunning parks. The city also offers a number of guided tours, including one that ends with a nice bowl of goulash.

11. AUSTIN, TEXAS 

Austin is committed to helping its residents live greener lives, and it shows in their biking initiatives. There are plenty of paths and hundreds of bike racks for riders to use. If you’re visiting, pick up a cycling map from one of the town’s many bike shops, then hit the trail. There are three major paths to help riders navigate downtown: the Lance Armstrong Bikeway, the Rio Grande Roadway, and the Pfluger Bicycle and Pedestrian Bridge.

12. PARIS, FRANCE 

Thanks to flat roads, slow traffic, and conscientious drivers, Paris is a remarkably easy place to ride a bike. The city’s Vélib bike-sharing program is the largest in the world outside of China. (The name is a mashup of the words vélo, meaning bike, and liberté, meaning freedom). There are about 20,000 rental bikes available at 1800 stations throughout town. Since the introduction of the bike-sharing program in 2007, bikeways have begun to pop up all over the bustling city. 

13. SEVILLE, SPAIN 

Seville is no match for cities like Amsterdam or Copenhagen, but they’re quickly becoming a contender in the battle to be “bicycle friendliest.” Seville offers 160 kilometers (100 miles) of bike paths, and sees about 70,000 bicycles hitting the streets every day. Compare this to the measly 6000 bicycles being used just a few years ago, and it quickly becomes apparent how much effort the city has put into upping their cycling game. They too offer a bike-sharing program (Sevici), which has been running for eight years, and bike shop owners claim that lately, they’ve been struggling to keep up with demand as more and more residents have taken to pedaling the streets. 

14. DUBLIN, IRELAND 

Dublin’s bike-sharing program, dublinbikes, features more than 100 stations across the city, and an annual subscription costs just €20 (about $22). A number of tour companies in Dublin offer guided excursions too, tailored to both beginner and advanced cyclists.

15. BERLIN, GERMANY 

Bikers in Berlin make the most of the city’s flat terrain, wide streets, and numerous bikeways. The 900 kilometers (about 559 miles) of cycling paths make it easy to get around without worrying about car traffic. There are plenty of themed tours for tourists, often geared towards sports or food.

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

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10 of the Best True Crime Documentaries You Can Stream Right Now

A still from Frank Serpico (2017).
A still from Frank Serpico (2017).
IFC Films

Is the true crime genre going anywhere? Probably not. Since Errol Morris’s The Thin Blue Line premiered in 1988 and helped free an innocent man accused of murder, filmmakers and viewers have developed a bottomless appetite for movies based on true stories that shed light on some of the darker sides of the human condition. Check out some of the best true crime documentaries you can stream right now on Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, and other platforms.

1. I Love You, Now Die (2019)

Teenagers in love Michelle Carter and Conrad Roy nourished their long-distance relationship via text messaging. But as Conrad’s moods grew darker, Michelle believed the best way to help her boyfriend would be to encourage him to take his own life. That dynamic sets the stage for a dramatic trial in Massachusetts that asks whether it's possible to be responsible for taking someone’s life via text.

Find It: HBO

2. Frank Serpico (2017)

An honest cop among thieves in late 1960s and early 1970s New York, Frank Serpico helped bring down corrupt officers and inspired the 1973 film Serpico starring Al Pacino. This film goes inside the mind of the man who made sure justice was being served—even at the risk of his own life.

Find it: Hulu

3. Dead Man's Line (2017)

In July 1977, a man named Tony Kiritsis phoned police in Indianapolis and told them he was holding a hostage named Richard Hall at gunpoint. But this was no typical crime: Kiritsis had strapped his shotgun to Hall's neck with a dead man's switch that would set off the trigger if cops shot and killed him. When he marched Hall out on the street, cops were helpless to intervene, which set off an astonishing chain of events. For Kiritsis, this dramatic display was personal, vengeful, and meant to be a spectacle—the result of a vendetta against the Hall family. What follows is a twist-laden and arresting portrait of a man who believes he's doing the wrong thing for the right reasons.

Find It: Amazon Prime

4. Out of Thin Air (2017)

In 1974, two men in Iceland disappeared. A police investigation led to six men, who were all eventually sent to prison after confessing to murder. Decades later, new evidence casts doubt on their version of events—and whether they killed anyone at all.

Find It: Netflix

5. Long Shot (2017)

Though it’s more of a short film than a feature, this examination of Juan Catalan’s fight to be recognized as innocent of committing murder is notable for his attorney’s methodology: Catalan couldn’t have done it because he was at a baseball game. How they go about proving that turns into one of the biggest left-field twists you’re ever likely to see.

Find It: Netflix

6. Killing for Love (2016)

When married couple Derek and Nancy Haysom are found dead in their Virginia home in 1985, suspicion falls on their daughter, Elizabeth, and Elizabeth’s boyfriend, Jens Söring. Was Jens a co-conspirator, or just a pawn in Elizabeth’s game? Watch and find out.

Find It: Hulu

7. Amanda Knox (2016)

College student Amanda Knox grabbed headlines in 2007 and beyond when her roommate, Meredith Kercher, was found dead in the apartment the two shared in Italy. What follows is a grueling path through an often-impenetrable Italian justice system.

Find It: Netflix

8. Dream/Killer (2015)

Bill Ferguson lived every parent's worst nightmare: In 2005, his son Ryan was sentenced to 40 years in prison for murder. But the elder Ferguson is convinced Ryan is innocent, setting off an unlikely chain of events that will test the foundation of the judicial system in America.

Find It: Netflix

9. Soaked in Bleach (2015)

The suicide of Kurt Cobain in 1994 was eulogized as a rock star tragedy. Soaked in Bleach ponders whether there was more to Cobain's life—and death—than was originally reported.

Find It: Amazon Prime

10. Without Charity (2013)

In 2000, police discovered a trio of construction workers who had been murdered at an expensive home in Indiana. As police dig deeper, they discover the puzzling presence of Charity Payne, a woman who might have helped a group of robbers to break in and commit the murders.

Find It: Amazon Prime