The Forgotten Uses of 8 Everyday Objects

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iStock

Some of the products we use daily have functions most of us are completely unaware of. From features not being used as the manufacturer intended, to details that are functionally outdated but still hanging on aesthetically, here are eight forgotten uses for everyday items.

1. THE TINY “EXTRA” POCKET ON YOUR JEANS


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You’ve probably noticed that some of your jeans have a small pocket located in one of the front pockets. Many people think the tiny addition is meant to keep coins from jingling around in the larger pocket, but according to Levi’s, they created it to provide extra protection for pocket watches. Nicknames for the wee receptacle include frontier pocket, condom pocket, coin pocket, match pocket, and ticket pocket.

2. THE HOLE IN YOUR POT HANDLE


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Most pots and many pans are designed with a small hole at the end of the handle. While they make for an easy way to hang your pots and pans when they're not in use, they were also designed with another purpose in mind: as a way to hold your spoon or spatula in place over the pot itself, and save yourself from making a mess of your stovetop.

3. THE LOOP ON THE BACK OF YOUR DRESS SHIRTS


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If you look below the collar and between the shoulders on the back of many men’s dress shirts, you may spot a little loop. Though most men probably don’t use it for its intended purpose—at least, not often—it's there to provide a convenient way to hang up the shirt when a hanger is unavailable. It’s said the "locker loop" practice began with sailors, who would hang their shirts on ship hooks while changing.

4. THE GLOVE COMPARTMENT


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It’s not just a clever name. While most of us probably use the dashboard hidey-hole in our cars to hold our vehicle registration and a stash of fast food napkins, early motorists actually used them to house their driving gloves. Though Packard added the compartment to their vehicles in 1900, it was British race car driver Dorothy Levitt who suggested that it was a perfect place for “the dainty motoriste” to keep a pair of gloves, which, at the time, were more about function than fashion (many cars still had open tops and drivers needed to keep their hands warm in order to steer them properly).

5. THE HOLES IN YOUR BOX OF ALUMINUM FOIL


If you've ever studied a box of aluminum foil or cling wrap, you may have noticed that there are little indentations that, once pushed in, create small holes on either end of the box. Look a little closer and the reason for these holes is printed right on the box: "Press to lock roll." Meaning you'll never have to deal with an unwieldy roll of tinfoil again.

6. THE DRAWER UNDER YOUR OVEN


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If you keep cookie sheets, cupcake pans, and pancake griddles in that narrow little drawer under your oven, you’re in good company—so does most of the rest of the world. But in many cases, that’s not how the manufacturer intended you to use it. Often, the compartment is intended to be a warming drawer, a place to keep finished food warm while other dishes are cooking. Some companies specifically warn against using the warming drawer for storage of any kind, so keep shoving your pans there at your own risk.

7. THE ADDITIONAL HOLES ON YOUR CONVERSE SNEAKERS

The main purpose of those seemingly extraneous pair of holes is to help with ventilation. But they're also there to provide a little extra lacing flair, should you so desire.

8. THE LOOP ON THE SIDE OF YOUR CARPENTER JEANS

Anyone who sported a pair of "carpenter jeans" in the late 1990s or early 2000s will remember that they came with a denim loop stitched on one side. Though they were purely decorative by that point, they hark back to real carpenter jeans, which have a number of pockets and loops meant to hold tools on the job.

Wayfair’s Fourth of July Clearance Sale Takes Up to 60 Percent Off Grills and Outdoor Furniture

Wayfair/Weber
Wayfair/Weber

This Fourth of July, Wayfair is making sure you can turn your backyard into an oasis while keeping your bank account intact with a clearance sale that features savings of up to 60 percent on essentials like chairs, hammocks, games, and grills. Take a look at some of the highlights below.

Outdoor Furniture

Brisbane bench from Wayfair
Brisbane/Wayfair

- Jericho 9-Foot Market Umbrella $92 (Save 15 percent)
- Woodstock Patio Chairs (Set of Two) $310 (Save 54 percent)
- Brisbane Wooden Storage Bench $243 (Save 62 percent)
- Kordell Nine-Piece Rattan Sectional Seating Group with Cushions $1800 (Save 27 percent)
- Nelsonville 12-Piece Multiple Chairs Seating Group $1860 (Save 56 percent)
- Collingswood Three-Piece Seating Group with Cushions $410 (Save 33 percent)

Grills and Accessories

Dyna-Glo electric smoker.
Dyna-Glo/Wayfair

- Spirit® II E-310 Gas Grill $479 (Save 17 percent)
- Portable Three-Burner Propane Gas Grill $104 (Save 20 percent)
- Digital Bluetooth Electric Smoker $224 (Save 25 percent)
- Cuisinart Grilling Tool Set $38 (Save 5 percent)

Outdoor games

American flag cornhole game.
GoSports

- American Flag Cornhole Board $57 (Save 19 percent)
- Giant Four in a Row Game $30 (Save 6 percent)
- Giant Jenga Game $119 (Save 30 percent)

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.

The Worst Drivers In America Live in These 15 States

Life of Pix, Pexels
Life of Pix, Pexels

No matter how many times you've been cut off on a road trip, anecdotal evidence alone can't prove that a certain state's drivers are worse than yours. For that, you need statistics. The personal finance company SmartAsset compiled data related to bad driving behaviors to create this list of the 15 states in America with the worst drivers.

This ranking is based on four metrics: the number of fatalities per 100 million miles driven in each state, DUI arrests per 1000 drivers, the percentage of uninsured drivers, and how often residents Google the terms “speeding ticket” or “traffic ticket.”

Mississippi ranks worst overall, with the second-highest number of fatalities and the second lowest percentage of insured drivers. This marked the third year in a row Mississippi claimed the bottom slot in SmartAsset's worst driver's list. This year, it's followed by Nevada in second place and Tennessee in third. You can check out the worst offenders in the country in the list below.

Some motorists may be more interested in avoiding the cities plagued by bad driving than the states. These two categories don't always align: Oregon, which didn't crack the top 10 states with the worst drivers, is home to Portland, the city with the worst drivers according to one quote comparison site. After reading through the list of states, compare it to the cities with the worst drivers in America here.

  1. Mississippi
  1. Nevada
  1. Tennessee
  1. Florida
  1. California
  1. Arizona
  1. South Carolina (Tie)
  1. Texas (Tie)
  1. New Mexico
  1. Alaska
  1. Louisiana
  1. Alabama
  1. Oregon
  1. Arkansas
  1. Colorado