11 Wedding Superstitions From Around the World

iStock
iStock

You’ve likely heard that before a bride can wed she requires something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue (representing her past, her future, and the hope of “borrowing” good fortune from a happily married woman and fidelity, respectively) or that the husband- and wife-to-be shouldn’t see each other pre-vows. (That one dates back to the time of arranged marriages when matchmakers feared the future spouses might run if they didn’t like their mate.)

But Americans aren’t the only ones with detailed wedding day rituals. Read on to discover the steps brides and grooms around the globe take to ensure they’ll last ’til death does them part.

1. IN GREECE, THE BRIDE AND GROOM GO NUTS WITH SNACKS.

The Mediterranean country is home to a sweet tradition. The happy couple hand out sugar-coated almonds, called koufeta, to their guests. As one Greek Orthodox bride explained to Manhattan Bride magazine, the white of the almond symbolizes purity, the egg shape is a sign of fertility, the hardness represents the endurance of marriage, and the sugar is meant to show the sweetness of married life. Together, they’re meant to wish the newly married duo "happiness, health, wealth, children, and a long life." And should a single girl take one of the blessed snacks and sleep with it under her pillow for three nights, tradition states she’ll somehow see her future husband!

2. IN SWEDEN, THE PARENTS OF THE BRIDE SHARE THE WEALTH.

Brides in the Nordic country add some heavy metal to their footwear. According to Stockholm website Your Living City, the father of the bride gives his daughter a silver coin to go in her left shoe, while Mom offers up a gold coin for her right. It’s meant to ensure she will never go without.

3. IN POLAND, BRIDES DON'T SKIMP ON THE SHOES.

Future wives in Poland must also pay close attention to their footwear. Tradition dictates that if they wear open-toed heels their future wealth and fortune would fly right through the opening. Fortunately, they have a shot to scoop up some extra cash. When the new Mr. and Mrs. exit the church, the guests shower them with coins they must scoop up to ensure a prosperous future.

4. IN SCOTLAND, FUTURE WIVES GET SAUCED.

Before a Scottish bride can be dressed in white, she must first be doused in slime. Pre-nuptials, the bride’s friends slather her—and sometimes her groom—in smelly foods like rotten eggs, curdled milk, and fish sauces. The tradition is said to prepare couples for the hardships of married life or to throw evil spirits off the trail of the upcoming big day.

5. IN FRANCE, WEDDING GUESTS PREPARE AN UNUSUAL FEAST FOR THE COUPLE.

French newlyweds flush away bad luck with a unique tradition called La Soupe: Guests gather the leftovers from the reception—or tasty treats like champagne and chocolate—and place them into a toilet or toilet-like bowl for the bride and groom to eat.

6. IN KENYA, THE FATHER OF THE BRIDE DOESN'T HOLD BACK.

The Maasai people in this African country douse newlyweds with good fortune. The father of the bride will spit on her head and chest as she leaves the village with her new husband. The thought is that by acting disrespectfully, rather than heaping them with praise, they avoid tempting fate and bringing bad luck to the new union.

7. IN NICARAGUA, BRIDES SKIP THE PEARLS.

In some ancient cultures, pearls are thought to symbolize wealth and love, but Nicaraguan brides won’t touch ‘em. In many Latin cultures, pearls mean “tears of the sea” and wearing them on your wedding day is a sign sadness is likely to show up in your marriage.

8. FUTURE WIVES IN MEXICO GET COLORFUL.

Mexican brides aren’t all dressed in white. Many will sew three colorful ribbons to their undergarments. A yellow strand symbolizes the blessing of food, blue is meant to bring financial luck, and red is believed to ensure a passionate relationship.

9. IN INDIA, BRIDES GET INKED.

As part of their pre-wedding celebrations, Indian brides have henna tattoos applied to their hands and feet in an hours-long ceremony. Often, the groom’s initials are included in the elaborate designs. If he’s able to locate them on the wedding night, the couple is thought to have good luck. And if he’s unsuccessful? He owes his new bride a present, which is somewhat lucky for her.

10. IN CHINA, SOME BRIDES GET TEARY, WHILE OTHERS CAREFULLY VET THEIR GUEST LISTS.

Betrothed couples in China have many key rituals to follow. In one province, brides must spend an hour a day crying in the month leading up to the nuptials day. In another, couples have to slaughter a chicken to discover the perfect wedding date. And some duos won’t attend another wedding, a funeral, or visit a woman who’s just given birth in the three months before their big day to avoid a clash of good fortune.

11. IN ITALY, COUPLES HAVE A SMASHING GOOD TIME.

To ensure a long marriage, some Italian couples will attempt to demolish a vase or glass during their wedding. Tradition states that however many pieces they manage to smash the glass into determines how many years they will be happily wed.

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6 Things We Know About the Game of Thrones Prequel Series, House of the Dragon

HBO
HBO

By the time Game of Thrones wrapped up its record-breaking eight-season run in 2019, it was a no-brainer that HBO would be producing another GoT series to keep the success going. The first announced show in the works, which was reportedly picked from a few prequel ideas, was going to chronicle a time thousands of years before the start of GoT, and was set to star actress Naomi Watts. Unfortunately, that project was eventually scrapped after the pilot was shot—but a new prequel series, House of the Dragon, was announced in October 2019. Here's what we know about it so far.

1. House of the Dragon will be based on George R.R. Martin's book Fire & Blood.

George R.R. Martin's novel Fire & Blood, which tells the story of House Targaryen, will serve as the source of inspiration for the plot of House of the Dragon. The first of two volumes was published in 2018, and takes place 300 years before Game of Thrones.

2. House of the Dragon will likely chronicle the Targaryen family's tumultuous past.

Game of Thrones showed that the Targaryen family has a long-standing history of inbreeding, secrets, betrayal, war, and insanity. Fire & Blood covers topics like the first Aegon Targaryen's conquest of the Seven Kingdoms and his subsequent reign, as well as the lives of his sons. Seems like we'll probably be meeting Dany's ancestors, and Martin confirmed there will definitely be dragons present—maybe even Balerion the Black Dread, the biggest dragon in all of Westerosi history.

3. George R.R. Martin and Ryan Condal are co-creators of House of the Dragon.

Co-Executive Producer George R.R. Martin arrives at the premiere of HBO's 'Game Of Thrones' Season 3 at TCL Chinese Theatre on March 18, 2013 in Hollywood, California
George R.R. Martin
Kevin Winter, Getty Images

Martin shared on his blog that he's been working with writer and producer Ryan Condal (Rampage, Colony), on the show. "Ryan Condal is new to Westeros, but not to me," the acclaimed author wrote. "I first met Ryan when he came to New Mexico to shoot a pilot for a fantasy western that was not picked up. I visited his set and we became friendly ... He’s a terrific writer … and a fan of my books since well before we met." In another blog post, Martin said that the show's script and bible were "terrific, first-rate, exciting." Sounds like we'll be in good hands.

5. A Game of Thrones director is returning for House of the Dragon.

Per a tweet from the Game of Thrones Twitter account announcing the show, Miguel Sapochnik, who directed many of the original HBO series' biggest episodes, such as "Battle of the Bastards" and "Hardhome," will be returning for House of the Dragon as showrunner alongside Condal. Sapochnik is also known for directing a handful of other notable shows, such as True Detective, Masters of Sex, and Altered Carbon.

6. House of the Dragon could be coming in 2022.

HBO ordered 10 episodes of House of the Dragon, and HBO president of programming Casey Bloys said he thought that the show would debut "sometime in 2022." However, with the film industry facing major delays due to safety concerns surrounding the coronavirus pandemic, there's no word on when the show will begin filming.

Meanwhile, Martin revealed that he won't be writing any scripts for House of the Dragon until he finishes The Winds of Winter, which has been in the works since A Dance With Dragons, his most recent book in the A Song of Ice and Fire series, debuted in 2011. The good news, however, is that Martin says he has been "writing every day" while keeping indoors and social distancing, leaving fans with the hope that The Winds of Winter will come soon.