This Country Has the Most Expensive Beer in the World

iStock
iStock

Iceland may be more affordable than many other European destinations, but if you want to save money, don't spend too much time at the pub. That's because a bjór there will set you back $12.75, making it the world's most expensive destination for beer, according to an infographic created by UK-based appliance manufacturer Amica.

Using data from The Wall Street Journal and cost-of-living information from numbeo.com, Amica set out to determine how much beer you'd get in bars around the world for $1. In Iceland, apparently, it's not very much. For $1, you’ll receive 45ml, or “barely a sip,” as Amica puts it.

The high price of alcohol in Iceland has much to do with taxes. Alcohol is taxed by volume, so the state would collect 94.1 percent of a bottle’s retail price for a one-liter bottle of vodka priced at $66, according to Iceland Magazine. Next to Iceland, the most expensive countries to order a pint in are Norway, the United Arab Emirates, Israel, and France.

The U.S. isn’t significantly better off, though. On average, $1 will get you 83ml of beer, or about two shot glasses full. Of course, there are notable exceptions, depending on the quality of the beer and the type of establishment you find yourself in.

As for the cheapest countries for beer, Paraguay and Vietnam are your best bets, followed by Ethiopia, Ukraine, and Nigeria. In parts of Vietnam (primarily Hanoi), you can sit outdoors on a low plastic stool and order a type of fresh, preservative-free beer called bia hoi (literally “gas beer”), which sells for less than 50 cents per glass.

Check out Amica's infographic below, which uses a 568ml pint glass to help people visualize the amount of beer they'll get for a buck.

An infographic of beer prices around the world
Amica

Wayfair’s Fourth of July Clearance Sale Takes Up to 60 Percent Off Grills and Outdoor Furniture

Wayfair/Weber
Wayfair/Weber

This Fourth of July, Wayfair is making sure you can turn your backyard into an oasis while keeping your bank account intact with a clearance sale that features savings of up to 60 percent on essentials like chairs, hammocks, games, and grills. Take a look at some of the highlights below.

Outdoor Furniture

Brisbane bench from Wayfair
Brisbane/Wayfair

- Jericho 9-Foot Market Umbrella $92 (Save 15 percent)
- Woodstock Patio Chairs (Set of Two) $310 (Save 54 percent)
- Brisbane Wooden Storage Bench $243 (Save 62 percent)
- Kordell Nine-Piece Rattan Sectional Seating Group with Cushions $1800 (Save 27 percent)
- Nelsonville 12-Piece Multiple Chairs Seating Group $1860 (Save 56 percent)
- Collingswood Three-Piece Seating Group with Cushions $410 (Save 33 percent)

Grills and Accessories

Dyna-Glo electric smoker.
Dyna-Glo/Wayfair

- Spirit® II E-310 Gas Grill $479 (Save 17 percent)
- Portable Three-Burner Propane Gas Grill $104 (Save 20 percent)
- Digital Bluetooth Electric Smoker $224 (Save 25 percent)
- Cuisinart Grilling Tool Set $38 (Save 5 percent)

Outdoor games

American flag cornhole game.
GoSports

- American Flag Cornhole Board $57 (Save 19 percent)
- Giant Four in a Row Game $30 (Save 6 percent)
- Giant Jenga Game $119 (Save 30 percent)

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Whip Up Your Favorite Writer’s Favorite Cocktail With How to Drink Like a Writer

Ernest Hemingway looked even more natural with a drink in hand than a pen in hand.
Ernest Hemingway looked even more natural with a drink in hand than a pen in hand.
Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche/Getty Images

Though Ernest Hemingway never actually uttered “Write drunk; edit sober,” he spent enough hours on a barstool to imply that his work was at least partially inspired by all that booze—and he’s definitely not the only one. F. Scott Fitzgerald, Dorothy Parker, Hunter S. Thompson, and countless other iconic writers had a soft spot for a stiff drink, too.

While you won’t discover the secret to penning the next great American novel at the bottom of the bottle, sipping your favorite author’s favorite cocktail could help get your creative juices flowing. In How to Drink Like a Writer, from Apollo Publishers, you’ll find recipes for the go-to drinks of 100 literary heavyweights, from Truman Capote’s signature screwdriver—which he fondly referred to as “my orange drink”—to Raymond Carver’s Bloody Mary, his hair of the dog after alcohol-infused nights with pal (and University of Iowa colleague) John Cheever.

how to drink like a writer cover image
Humans have two hands so we can hold a pen in one and a drink in the other.
Apollo Publishers/Amazon

You can order your copy of How to Drink Like a Writer for $19 from Amazon, and while you wait for your book to arrive, take a look at three of the famed literary cocktails below.

Charles Bukowski’s boilermaker.

There’s something for everyone in this book, no matter what you like to drink or how much time you’re willing to devote to crafting the perfect cocktail. For example, it doesn't take much to recreate Charles Bukowski’s favorite boilermaker—you just need a shot of bourbon and a pint of any light beer but Coors, which the longtime Los Angeles resident didn’t care for.

charles bukowski boilermaker recipe from how to drink like a writer book
Apollo Publishers

charles bukowski boilermaker recipe from how to drink like a writer book
Apollo Publishers

Ian Fleming's Vesper Martini.

For anyone hoping to emulate Ian Fleming and the dashing, debonair nature of his legendary protagonist, James Bond, there’s the Vesper martini—a lemon-garnished goblet of gin, vodka, and Lillet Blanc that’ll have you scanning your own living room for any suspicious activity.

ian fleming's vesper martini from how to drink like a writer book
Apollo Publishers

ian fleming's vesper martini from how to drink like a writer book
Apollo Publishers

Jane Austen's Negus.

If you’re planning a cheerful party for close friends on a chilly winter night, you might prepare a warm pot of negus—the spiced wine that Jane Austen mentions in Mansfield Park and The Watsons. Wondering what to serve with it? The sugary port pairs well with white soup, an oniony, veal-based dish popular during the late 18th century. The book includes a recipe for that—and dishes that complement other cocktails—as well as tips for hosting a Paris-inspired salon and fascinating details about certain well-frequented bars, like Jack Kerouac’s Vesuvio Cafe.

jane austen's negus from how to drink like a writer book
Apollo Publishers

jane austen's negus from how to drink like a writer book
Apollo Publishers

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