The Most-Googled Thanksgiving Recipe in Each State

iStock.com/VeselovaElena
iStock.com/VeselovaElena

Each year when November rolls around, novice cooks start frantically searching for answers to all their turkey-related questions. When should it be thawed? Is an oven or deep fryer better? What’s the best recipe? Hotlines like Butterball’s Turkey Talk-Line get flooded with hundreds of thousands of calls each holiday season.

So it’s no surprise that turkey was the most-Googled Thanksgiving dish across America last November, according to Satelliteinternet.com’s new analysis of food-related Google searches. But not every cook was looking for turkey advice last Thanksgiving. There was plenty of regional variation in the recipes people were searching for, as the map below shows.

Green bean and corn casseroles were the next most-searched items after turkey last year, having amassed a particularly large fan base in the Midwest. Other searches are more unique. Vermonters seem to love ambrosia salad, while Louisianans can be expected to serve up a lot of cornbread dressing. Meanwhile, residents of Maryland, Virginia, Mississippi, and Illinois wanted to know how to make a copycat version of Popeyes Cajun turkey. (If you happen to be one of them, you can view a recipe here.)

A color-coded map of the U.S.
Satelliteinternet.com

Meanwhile, in Idaho and Utah, Jell-O is apparently a very popular dish in the month of November. Perhaps people were whipping up something like Allrecipe.com's Thanksgiving Jell-O Salad, which is made from crushed pineapple, cottage cheese, lime Jell-O, and whipped topping.

Previous analyses have found even more variation in what Americans eat on Thanksgiving. Back in 2014, The New York Times looked into the most uniquely popular Thanksgiving dish in each state, excluding common dishes like turkey. Deer jerky, sweet potato dumplings, asparagus casserole, turkey enchiladas, and something called frog eye salad were a few of the top search results.

Those dishes aren’t nearly as weird as some of the Thanksgiving dishes that were served up several decades ago, though. Creamed onions, cranberry salad with mayonnaise, and jellied turkey-vegetable salad are among some of the more off-putting vintage recipes we’ve dug up.

61 Festive Facts About Thanksgiving

jenifoto/iStock via Getty Images
jenifoto/iStock via Getty Images

From the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade to back-to-back NFL games, there are certain Thanksgiving traditions that you’re probably familiar with, even if your own celebration doesn’t necessarily include them. But how much do you really know about the high-calorie holiday?

To give you a crash course on the history of Thanksgiving and everything we associate with it, WalletHub compiled stats from the U.S. Census Bureau, the American Farm Bureau Association, Harris Poll, and more into one illuminating infographic. Featured facts include the date Abraham Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a national holiday (October 3, 1863) and the percentage of Americans whose favorite dish is turkey (39 percent).

Not only is it interesting to learn how the majority of Americans celebrate the holiday, it also might make you feel better about how your own Thanksgiving usually unfolds. If you’re frantically calling the Butterball Turkey hotline for help on how to cook a giant bird, you’re not alone—the hotline answers more than 100,000 questions in November and December. And you’re in good company if your family forgoes the home-cooked meal altogether, too: 9 percent of Americans head to a restaurant for Thanksgiving dinner.

It’s also a great way to fill in the blanks of your Thanksgiving knowledge. You might know that the president ceremoniously pardons one lucky turkey every year, but do you know which president kicked off the peculiar practice? It was George H.W. Bush, in 1989.

Read on to discover the details of America’s most delicious holiday below, and find out why we eat certain foods on Thanksgiving here.

Thanksgiving-2019-By-The-Numbers

Source: WalletHub

[h/t WalletHub]

That's What She Said: The Best Jokes on The Office by the Numbers

NBC
NBC

The Office, which was first a long-running NBC sitcom and now a perennial Netflix streaming hit, enjoys a loyal fan following thanks to its frequently excruciating scenes of workplace conflict. The staff of paper company Dunder Mifflin's Scranton, Pennsylvania office—led by intellectually impaired Michael Scott (Steve Carell)—often find themselves in a spiral of recurring jokes, including Michael’s tone-deaf expression of “That’s what she said” following virtually any innocuous phrase.

Text marketing service SimpleTexting recently did quite a bit of math to arrive at a definitive count for these mentions. Have a look:

An infographic of 'The Office' from SimpleTexting is pictured
SimpleTexting

As you can see, Michael’s catchphrase was nonexistent in season 1, came on strong in season 2, and reached peak Michael in season 4. The dearth of mentions in seasons 8 and 9 is owed to Carell's departure from the show.

Naturally, Michael was responsible for most of those mentions:

An infographic of 'The Office' from SimpleTexting is pictured
SimpleTexting

Next we see how often characters mention their topics of interest:

An infographic of 'The Office' from SimpleTexting is pictured
SimpleTexting

The site also attempted to determine through dialogue analysis which character was the most positive (David Wallace) and who was most negative (Stanley Hudson). It will not surprise you to learn that Michael spoke twice as many words (146,600) as the second-most talkative character, Dwight Schrute (74,606). You can head over to SimpleTexting to find out more.

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