Humpback Whales in Canada Get Fish to Swim Right Into Their Mouths

iStock.com/psahota
iStock.com/psahota

Humpback whales are incredibly intelligent creatures, so it’s perhaps no surprise that they’re also savvy hunters. As Cosmos magazine reports, humpbacks off the northeastern coast of Vancouver Island have been seen tricking fish into swimming directly into their open mouths.

These cetaceans usually lunge toward their prey, and since they're about the size of a school bus, this is generally a pretty sound method. However, researchers spotted two humpback whales testing out a totally new tactic in 2011. Instead of chasing after fish, the crafty cetaceans were seen holding still while looking up towards the sky with half of their heads poking above the water. When they open their jaws, the dark recesses inside their mouths can easily be mistaken for a safe harbor, where fish might seek refuge from predatory seabirds. The cetaceans also use their pectoral fins to draw water towards them, and once the Pacific herring have been lured inside, they snap their powerful jaws shut. On average, they keep their mouths open for 18 to 90 seconds.

“The whale is providing a shadow or shelter,” Christie McMillan, executive director of the Marine Education and Research Society, tells The Vancouver Sun. “It’s like a Venus flytrap, a sit-and-wait idea. It’s not working so well for the herring, but it’s working for the whales.”

This trap-feeding technique was described for the first time by researchers from the society in a recent issue of Marine Mammal Science. Even more remarkably, the behavior seems to be spreading, which means the whales might be learning from each other. Only two humpbacks were spotted using the technique in 2011, but 16 were seen trap-feeding in 2015.

“Based on the rapid diffusion of the behavior and the characteristics of the prey consumed using this technique, trap-feeding appears to be an energetically efficient method of foraging on juvenile herring that is culturally transmitted between humpback whales," the researchers write in their paper.

The behavior hasn’t yet spread among humpbacks beyond British Columbia, as far as researchers can tell. However, Bryde’s whales in the Gulf of Thailand have exhibited similar feeding behaviors, according to The Vancouver Sun.

[h/t Cosmos]

This $49 Video Game Design Course Will Teach You Everything From Coding to Digital Art Skills

EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images
EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images

If you spend the bulk of your free time playing video games and want to elevate your hobby into a career, you can take advantage of the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, which is currently on sale for just $49. You can jump into your education as a beginner, or at any other skill level, to learn what you need to know about game development, design, coding, and artistry skills.

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The lifetime membership that’s currently discounted is intended to allow you to learn at your own pace so you don’t burn out, which would be pretty difficult to do because the lessons have you building advanced games in just your first few hours of learning. The remote classes will train you with step-by-step, hands-on projects that more than 50,000 other students around the world can vouch for.

Once you’ve nailed the basics, the lifetime membership provides unlimited access to thousands of dollars' worth of royalty-free game art and textures to use in your 2D or 3D designs. Support from instructors and professionals with over 16 years of game industry experience will guide you from start to finish, where you’ll be equipped to land a job doing something you truly love.

Earn money doing what you love with an education from the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, currently discounted at $49.

 

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A Prehistoric Great White Shark Nursery Has Been Discovered in Chile

Great white sharks used prehistoric nurseries to protect their young.
Great white sharks used prehistoric nurseries to protect their young.
solarseven/iStock via Getty Images

Great white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) may be one of the most formidable and frightening apex predators on the planet today, but life for them isn’t as easy as horror movies would suggest. Due to a slow growth rate and the fact that they produce few offspring, the species is listed as vulnerable to extinction.

There is a way these sharks ensure survival, and that is by creating nurseries—a designated place where great white shark babies (called pups) are protected from other predators. Now, researchers at the University of Vienna and colleagues have discovered these nurseries occurred in prehistoric times.

In a study published in the journal Scientific Reports, Jamie A. Villafaña from the university’s Institute of Palaeontology describes a fossilized nursery found in Coquimbo, Chile. Researchers were examining a collection of fossilized great white shark teeth between 5 and 2 million years old along the Pacific coast of Chile and Peru when they noticed a disproportionate number of young shark teeth in Coquimbo. There was also a total lack of sexually mature animals' teeth, which suggests the site was used primarily by pups and juveniles as a nursery.

Though modern great whites are known to guard their young in designated areas, the researchers say this is the first example of a paleo-nursery. Because the climate was much warmer when the paleo-nursery was in use, the researchers think these protective environments can deepen our understanding of how great white sharks can survive global warming trends.