Missouri Deer Poacher Sentenced to One Year in Jail—Plus Monthly Viewings of Bambi

Buena Vista Home Entertainment
Buena Vista Home Entertainment

Most people wouldn’t consider a mandatory monthly viewing of the 1942 Disney classic Bambi a harsh punishment (unless maybe you’re a parent who has seen it 100 times). However, as CNN reports, a deer poacher from Brookline, Missouri, has been sentenced to a year in prison, where he’ll be required to watch Bambi once a month. (Spoiler alert: Bambi’s mother is killed by a hunter.)

Lawrence County Judge Robert George issued the unusual punishment to the defendant, David Berry Jr. According to the Springfield News-Leader, Berry "is to view the Walt Disney movie Bambi, with the first viewing being on or before December 23, 2018, and at least one such viewing each month thereafter, during Defendant's incarceration in the Lawrence County Jail."

Berry was arrested in 2016 for illegally shooting deer, then removing their heads and antlers. “The deer were trophy bucks taken illegally, mostly at night, for their heads, leaving the bodies of the deer to waste," Lawrence County prosecuting attorney Don Trotter told the Springfield News-Leader. Berry has also been banned from hunting, fishing, and trapping for the rest of his life.

His conviction was part of a larger investigation that ultimately handed down 230 charges to 14 Missouri residents, including other members of Berry’s family. Authorities say several hundred deer were illegally killed over the course of a few years; it ended up being one of the largest poaching cases in the state's history.

Judge George isn’t the only one who has turned to pop culture for creative punishments. Colorado judge Paul Sacco has been to known to make noise ordinance violators listen to the Barney and Friends theme song or Barry Manilow for an hour. In 2008, Judge Susan Fornof-Lippencott offered to reduce the $150 fine given to 24-year-old Andrew Vactor for blasting rap music in his car if he listened to Bach, Beethoven, and Chopin for 20 hours. He lasted 15 minutes, then agreed to pay the full fine. (Vactor swore it wasn't the music, though; he said he needed to be at basketball practice at Urbana University and just "didn't have the time to deal with that.")

[h/t CNN]

Drunken Thieves Tried Stealing Stones From Notre-Dame

Notre-Dame.
Notre-Dame.
Athanasio Gioumpasis, Getty Images

With Paris, France, joining a long list of locales shutting down due to coronavirus, two thieves decided the time was right to attempt a clumsy heist—stealing stones from the Notre-Dame cathedral.

The crime occurred last Tuesday, March 17, and appeared from the start to be ill-conceived. The two intruders entered the cathedral and were immediately spotted by guards, who phoned police. When authorities found them, the trespassers were apparently drunk and attempting to hide under a tarpaulin with a collection of stones they had taken from the premises. Both men were arrested.

It’s believed the offenders intended to sell the material for a profit. Stones from the property sometimes come up for sale on the black market, though most are fake.

The crime comes as Paris is not only dealing with the coronavirus pandemic but a massive effort to restore Notre-Dame after the cathedral was ravaged by a fire in 2019. That work has come to a halt in the wake of the health crisis, though would-be looters should take note that guards still patrol the property.

[h/t The Art Newspaper]

Crepe and Punishment: Police in Surrey, England Are Using Pancakes to Share Wanted Posters

Svetlana Monyakova, iStock via Getty Images
Svetlana Monyakova, iStock via Getty Images

It can be hard to get people to care about local crime, so the police department of Surrey, England, recently took advantage of something everyone has an opinion on: breakfast. As Sky News reports, the Surrey Police have updated their social media with wanted posters of suspects superimposed onto pancakes.

The functional flapjacks were shared on Pancake Day, or Shrove Tuesday, February 25. They're in the style of the pancake art that's popular on social media, but instead of cute cartoon characters, they depict faces of people wanted by the authorities.

"We’ve asked Crepe Artiste Philippe de Pan to help us locate some of our most wanted through the medium of pancake art," the Surrey police tweeted on Pancake Day. In a later tweet, they confess that Philippe de Pan isn't a real person and the appetizing wanted posters were rendered digitally.

With one picture, the department tweeted, "If you can help us crepe up on him, give us a call." They also shared real photos of the suspects for clarity, saying: "If you are struggling a bit with the 'crepe' artwork, maybe this 'batter' image will help!"

The stunt was pulled as a joke, but it could be an effective way to get people's attention. Most Twitter users scroll through their feeds quickly, but if they see a fluffy stack of pancakes, they maple the break, fast.

[h/t Sky News]

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