Kitchen Hack Alert: You Can Shred Chicken in Seconds With a Stand Mixer

iStock.com/Molina86
iStock.com/Molina86

If you’ve been using two forks or your bare hands to shred chicken for tacos or potluck sandwiches, then we have some game-changing news for you. PopSugar pointed out that a KitchenAid or other stand mixer can be used to shred chicken breasts in mere seconds, making it much easier—and faster—than any method you’ve likely used before.

Once you’ve fully cooked the chicken breasts in a pan or crock-pot using your preferred blend of broth and seasonings, transfer the chicken to the mixer bowl. Be sure to use the standard paddle attachment that came with the mixer, and turn it to the lowest setting to begin the shredding process. It should take you no more than one minute to complete (the timing depends on how finely you’d like it to be shredded).

This super simple method has been championed by several professional chefs. “You’re never going to have burnt fingers again from shredding the chicken before it’s cool enough,” cook and YouTube personality Noreen Lambert said in a video demonstrating the method. “You’re just going to put it in your mixer bowl and you’re going to let it go.”

This trick also works for pulled pork and brisket—just be sure to remove any bones before sticking the meat into the mixing bowl.

Looking for some more kitchen hacks to step up your culinary game? Check out our 15 cooking tips, plus easier ways to use a can opener and cheese grater.

[h/t PopSugar]

May Cause Anal Leakage: The Olestra Fat-Free Snack Controversy of the 1990s

Consumers could go through bags of Frito-Lay's fat-free chips. Then the bag would go right through them.
Consumers could go through bags of Frito-Lay's fat-free chips. Then the bag would go right through them.
John T. Barr, Getty Images

When Procter & Gamble began market-testing a fat-free version of their popular Pringles snack in late 1996, Pringles brand manager Casey Keller called their attempt to revolutionize the food industry with the calorie-conscious chips “the number-one unmet consumer need” of the moment.

The chip, which had zero grams of fat and only half the calories of conventional Pringles, was made possible by Procter & Gamble’s olestra, a synthetic fat molecule marketed under the brand name Olean. Because it was too large to be absorbed by the intestine, it passed through the digestive tract—a little too quickly, as it turned out.

Olestra, which was found in Pringles and later in Frito-Lay products like Ruffles and Doritos, was burdened by a nagging problem. The miraculous fat molecule gave a percentage of consumers stomach cramps, loose bowel movements, and diarrhea. It also led to the coining of phrases not normally associated with snack foods, like “fecal urgency” and “anal leakage.”

A 25-Year-Long Journey

Olestra’s origins date back to 1968, when Procter and Gamble researchers were investigating fats that premature infants might be able to tolerate more easily. Over time, they found that attaching an increased number of fatty acids to the sorbitol molecule rendered the fats unable to pass through the mucus membrane of the intestine and were therefore totally indigestible.

Because sorbitol was expensive, researchers substituted sucrose and combined it with triglycerides. With this “fake” fat derived from cottonseed and soybean oils, they seemed to have discovered the holy grail of satiety: a greasy additive that provided flavor with zero calories, zero fat, and zero cholesterol.

The development process took 15 years. It took another 10 years for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to approve olestra for the so-called savory food category: potato chips, pretzels, and other salty snacks—but there were a few wrinkles. For one, olestra appeared to affect how the body absorbed vitamins A, E, D, and K. It also impacted dietary carotenoids, which may help the body ward off cancer and heart disease. The FDA insisted snacks made with olestra be supplemented with vitamins in order to offset any imbalance that ingestion might cause. The agency also mandated a package warning about abdominal cramping and loose stools, an observed side effect of olestra consumption.

Procter & Gamble made a minor stir about the label—after all, it can be difficult to market food with a warning that it might give you explosive diarrhea—but was otherwise pleased. After 25 years and an estimated $200 million in development costs, olestra was finally ready for store shelves.

Procter & Gamble started with Pringles, test marketing a fat-free version of the baked chips in Ohio in 1996. As the company was prepared to sell the ingredient to other snack companies, Frito-Lay began experimenting with it in Lay's, Ruffles, Tostitos, and Doritos that same year. Early word was encouraging, and all products went on to a national rollout in 1998.

Something's stirring

For a public weaned on the idea that dietary fats were bad, olestra caused a huge stir. Frito-Lay, which marketed the chips under the brand name Wow!, pushed the idea that the chips had just 75 calories per serving, half the calories of the regular recipe, and no fat instead of the 10 grams typical of chips. That the snacks could conceivably create bathroom emergencies was relegated to late-night talk show jokes. Procter & Gamble largely dismissed the claims, comparing the potential gastrointestinal distress of olestra to eating beans or broccoli.

But broccoli had never been demonstrated to cause an orange-yellow liquid to seep out of one’s rear end. The FDA and Procter & Gamble were inundated with 16,700 complaints from consumers that products made with olestra were giving them problems from flatulence to stained underwear. A meeting of Washington’s Center for Science in the Public Interest, which had criticized Procter & Gamble for hyping olestra, featured video testimony of people afflicted by the molecule. One claimed the cramps of snacking were comparable to the early stages of labor.

Other experiences with olestra were said to include the passing of orange-yellow “globules” of oil as well as difficulty wiping. The Center even shared a study commissioned by Frito-Lay which was meant to be confidential that demonstrated “anal oil leakage” was experienced by 3 to 9 percent of study subjects. “Underwear spotting” was present in 5 percent. A variety of gastrointestinal issues were observed in 7 percent.

The potential for leakage aside, olestra overcame much of its bad publicity. Frito-Lay sold $347 million in Wow! chips in 1998 alone. The fat-free Pringles were good for $100 million that same year. It appeared that consumers were sufficiently enticed by a lower-calorie option that they wanted to see how olestra would affect them first-hand.

High hopes and loose stool

It’s impossible to know what percentage of consumers experienced adverse effects. But it’s not hard to see why it could have proven so problematic. Unlike the practical serving sizes eaten in studies, consumers tend to binge on chips, devouring a bag at a time or in conjunction with other food. While Procter & Gamble admonished that chips were snacks, it was hard to dissuade people from seeing a bag of chips with half the calories and just eating the entire thing. Even Procter & Gamble admitted that gorging could give you loose stools and cramping.

Procter & Gamble had high hopes for olestra, projecting $1 billion in sales in 2000 and eventually an entire line of olestra-infused goods like salad dressings and desserts. But two years after its explosively profitable debut, sales were just half that, and only a few other companies like Utz and Herr’s used olestra in their products. Even after the FDA removed the label warning requirement in 2003, consumers weren’t finding runny stool all that appetizing.

Frito-Lay renamed their Wow! chips to Ruffles Light and Doritos Light in 2004. In 2009, Procter & Gamble made olestra an additive in eco-friendly paints and lubricants. Some foods are still made with olestra, though it’s no longer the industry disruptor that the company had hoped for.

Speaking of its potential in 1998, Procter & Gamble's then-chairman and chief executive John E. Pepper, Jr. believed that olestra could soon take a place of prominence among other Procter & Gamble products, like Pampers diapers. He did not mention whether he expected sales of the former would help sales of the latter.

Restaurants Are Transforming Into Grocery Stores During Coronavirus Shutdowns

Your favorite eatery could soon temporarily become your new local grocery store.
Your favorite eatery could soon temporarily become your new local grocery store.
zlikovec/ iStock via Getty Images

The restaurant landscape has transformed rapidly since the start of the novel coronavirus pandemic. While the most common change has been switching to pick-up and delivery only, some businesses have found more creative ways to bring in revenue while meeting the needs of their communities. As CNN reports, some restaurants that have been forced to turn away diners are reopening to sell groceries.

With more people feeding themselves at home and stocking up on food, once-common pantry staples have become harder to find. Everything from flour to peanut butter has disappeared from supermarket shelves. Restaurants, meanwhile, are facing the opposite problem—restrictions placed on gathering in public means much of their inventory is going unsold. Selling raw ingredients directly to consumers is an innovative solution.

The list of restaurants-turned-grocery stores includes major chains like Panera Bread. The fast casual eatery rolled out Panera Grocery on April 6, which allows people to order bread, milk, and produce online or through the company's app. Instead of braving a crowded store to get the items, customers can pick them up at a drive-thru window or request contactless delivery.

Independent restaurants across the country are also experimenting with the new business model. In New York City, Best Pizza now sells pizza packs with uncooked dough, pizza sauce, and housemade mozzarella, while Ends Meat is selling bread, olives, and deli meat for assembling your own sandwiches at home. Don's Diner and Cocktails in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has transformed into a full corner store. In addition to dry pasta and tomato sauce, they also sell toilet paper and cleaning supplies out of their repurposed dining room.

To avoid a trip to the supermarket, reach out to the restaurants in your neighborhood to see if they're selling groceries. When grocery shopping is unavoidable, here are some safety tips to keep in mind.

[h/t CNN]

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