A Full Beaver Moon Is Coming in November

SusanHepton/iStock via Getty Images
SusanHepton/iStock via Getty Images

The title given to the full moon of any given month can tell you a lot about the priorities of early Americans. In August, the full sturgeon moon once meant it was time to harvest the fish from the Great Lakes, while the worm moon of March referenced the earthworms that signaled the approach of spring. The beaver moon, which is set to appear on November 12 in 2019, is no different.

What is a beaver moon?

Beaver moon is the name of the first (and typically the only) full moon of the November lunar cycle. It's meaning is said to have originated with the Algonquin people, and was eventually adapted by European colonists in North America. November used to be the time for putting down beaver traps in anticipation of the cold winter months. It's usually the last month before swamps and lakes freeze over up north, and therefore it was the last month to stock up on warm beaver furs.

Another folk name for November's full moon is the full frost moon, but according to The Old Farmer's Almanac, beaver moon is the name that stuck.

When to See the Beaver Moon

Following September's Friday the 13th harvest moon and October's hunter's moon, the beaver moon in November is the next full moon to catch. It will reach its fullest state at 8:34 a.m. ET, but it will still appear full the previous night and the following evening. For the best viewing conditions, go out when the sky is darkest—usually around midnight—on November 12, and make sure you're in a spot with minimal light pollution. Here are some more tips for sky gazing.

A Snow Moon Will Light Up February Skies

makasana, iStock via Getty Images
makasana, iStock via Getty Images

February is the snowiest month of the year in many parts of the U.S., but on February 9, consider braving the weather outside to look up at the sky. That Sunday morning, the only full snow moon of the year will be visible. Here's what you need to know about the celestial event.

What is a snow moon?

If you keep track of the phases of the moon, you may already know that the full moon of each month has its own special name. Following January's wolf moon lunar eclipse is a snow moon in February. The name snow moon is said to have originated with Native American tribes, and it refers to the heavy snowfall that hits many parts of North America in February.

According to The Old Farmer's Almanac, different tribes had different names for February's full moon. The Wishram people named it the shoulder to shoulder around the fire moon and the Cherokee people called it the bone moon because animal bones were sometimes their only source of nutrition in the dead of winter. Snow moon is the name that's most commonly used by almanacs today.

When to See the Snow Moon

The moon will enter its next full phase the morning of Sunday, February 9. The snow moon will be at its fullest at 2:34 a.m. EST, but if you're not willing to stay up that late, it's still worth looking up. The previous evening—Saturday, February 8—the moon will be 99 percent illuminated on the East Coast. Check your local weather forecast and find a spot with clear skies to get the best view of the wintertime spectacle.

The Wolf Moon, 2020’s First Full Moon, Coincides With a Lunar Eclipse

kirstypargeter/iStock via Getty Images
kirstypargeter/iStock via Getty Images

The first full moon—known as the wolf moon, since wolves supposedly howl more during the winter when food is scarce—is going to be a little extra special this year.

What is the wolf moon eclipse?

According to Newsweek, 2020’s wolf moon coincides with a penumbral lunar eclipse, which occurs when the moon enters Earth’s outer shadow, or penumbra. Because the penumbra is a wider, lighter shadow than the umbra, which is in Earth’s direct wake, this isn’t the most striking type of eclipse. During its peak, the moon will simply appear a little less bright. To see the characteristic reddish-orange “blood moon” of a total lunar eclipse, when the moon does pass into the Earth’s umbra, we’ll have to wait until May 26, 2021.

Where to See the Wolf Moon Eclipse

Since this Friday’s eclipse happens during the day in North and South America, most people in the U.S. won’t be able to catch the show. If you live in Europe, Asia, Africa, or Australia, however, you can see the moon in all its glorious dimness when the sun sets on Friday, January 10. Forbes reports that the eclipse will begin at 12:07 p.m. EST (5:07 p.m. UTC) and reach maximum eclipse at 2:10 p.m. EST (7:10 p.m. UTC).

If you do live in North or South America, it’s still worth a skyward glance when night falls on January 10—even a regular full moon is pretty spectacular. You’ll get a chance to see a penumbral lunar eclipse for yourself on July 5.

[h/t Newsweek]

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER