A Super Worm Moon Is Coming on the First Day of Spring

iStock.com/Sjo
iStock.com/Sjo

So far, 2019 has been a treat for astronomy fans. The last supermoon (and the brightest one of the year) was visible on February 19, and the next one is set to appear barely a month later on Wednesday, March 20, the first day of spring. Instead of the snow moon that came last month, this upcoming celestial event will be a super worm moon.

What is a supermoon?

A supermoon is defined as the Moon's seemingly larger size when viewed from Earth. The Moon is constantly circling our planet, and its apparent size in the night sky changes depending on where it is in its oval-shaped orbit. Its perigee is the point in its orbit that brings it closest to Earth; when the Moon reaches its perigee on a day when it's full, it's officially a supermoon.

Full moons also have different nicknames based on the time of year they occur. Last month's event was a snow moon: the first full moon that appears in February. March's supermoon will be a worm moon. A worm moon is usually the last full moon of winter, and it's named after the earthworms that start wriggling their way through the soil as spring approaches. In this case, the full moon coincides with the vernal equinox—the start of the spring season. The last time a full moon coincided with the first day of spring was March 20, 1981.

When to watch the next supermoon

The best time to catch the next supermoon are the nights of Tuesday, March 19 and Wednesday, March 20. At 2:48 p.m. on Tuesday, the Moon will reach its perigee, and at 8:43 p.m. ET on Wednesday, the Moon will be at its fullest. The Moon will also appear especially close and bright on the days surrounding the spring equinox.

Supermoons have felt like a common occurrence this year, with three appearing in the first three months in 2019. But after the worm moon, they will be much rarer: The next supermoon with a full moon won't happen until 2020. There will, however, be two new moon supermoons in August, but even though the Moon will be at the closest point in its orbit during the events, it won't be visible in the night sky.

LEGO Is Launching an Official International Space Station Set

LEGO
LEGO

Not everyone can live out their childhood dreams of floating around in space aboard the International Space Station, but now you can at least construct a toy version of it for your own house.

Next month, LEGO is releasing an impressive model of the International Space Station as part of its Ideas program, which produces designs that were suggested by fans. This one was submitted three years ago by Christoph Ruge.

LEGO ISS
LEGO

According to TechCrunch, the kit includes the ISS, a dockable space shuttle, two astronaut figurines, and a satellite that you can “deploy” with the robotic Canadarm2 (which is used to capture and repair satellites on the ISS). It also comes with a display stand, so you can make it the eye-catching centerpiece of your coffee table if it happens to match your living room decor.

The ISS might not look as formidable as the life-size model of astronaut Buzz Aldrin that LEGO builders created last year, but that doesn’t mean it’s not difficult to construct—the 864-piece set is labeled for kids ages 16 and older.

LEGO ISS
LEGO

Having said that, it doesn’t mean that younger kids can’t help out with the assembly, or at least play with it once it’s complete. At about 7 inches high, 12 inches long, and 19 inches wide, the station could inspire the next generation of space explorers.

The $70 kit will be available on February 1 in LEGO stores or the LEGO website.

[h/t TechCrunch]

Mental Floss has affiliate relationships with certain retailers and may receive a small percentage of any sale. But we choose all products independently and only get commission on items you buy and don't return, so we're only happy if you're happy. Thanks for helping us pay the bills!

A Snow Moon Will Light Up February Skies

makasana, iStock via Getty Images
makasana, iStock via Getty Images

February is the snowiest month of the year in many parts of the U.S., but on February 9, consider braving the weather outside to look up at the sky. That Sunday morning, the only full snow moon of the year will be visible. Here's what you need to know about the celestial event.

What is a snow moon?

If you keep track of the phases of the moon, you may already know that the full moon of each month has its own special name. Following January's wolf moon lunar eclipse is a snow moon in February. The name snow moon is said to have originated with Native American tribes, and it refers to the heavy snowfall that hits many parts of North America in February.

According to The Old Farmer's Almanac, different tribes had different names for February's full moon. The Wishram people named it the shoulder to shoulder around the fire moon and the Cherokee people called it the bone moon because animal bones were sometimes their only source of nutrition in the dead of winter. Snow moon is the name that's most commonly used by almanacs today.

When to See the Snow Moon

The moon will enter its next full phase the morning of Sunday, February 9. The snow moon will be at its fullest at 2:34 a.m. EST, but if you're not willing to stay up that late, it's still worth looking up. The previous evening—Saturday, February 8—the moon will be 99 percent illuminated on the East Coast. Check your local weather forecast and find a spot with clear skies to get the best view of the wintertime spectacle.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER