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Don't Look Stupid on Saturday, either

Remember, y'all. Tomorrow is April 1st, which--to quote Puddnhead Wilson--"is the day on which we are reminded of what we are on the other three hundred and sixty-four."

Prepare yourself for the salt-in-the-sugar trick tomorrow morning with The 100 Top April Fools' Pranks of all time. My personal favorite would be the April 1998 issue of New Mexicans for Science and Reason. Now, we do not wish to criticize New Mexico, which we are sure includes many, many citizens who favor science and reason, but this journal has never had a terribly high subscription base.

And yet despite that small circulation, the journal became famous for publishing an article claiming that the legislature in my home state, Alabama, had changed the value of pi from 3.14... to its "Biblical value" of 3. The article spread on the Internet, was taken as gospel (so much for science and reason), and continues to get occasionally forwarded to this day.

Oh, and if you're looking for April Fool's pranks, consider taking a page from hilarious prankster Uday Hussein. Between 1998 and 2000, Uday's newspaper published a different hilarious April Fools' Day story each year, including one asserting that jokingly told the Iraqi people that their food ration would be increased to include bananas. The people were all like, "Oh thank God, I'm so hungry," and then Uday was all like, "Just kidding," and then the people were all like, "Oh, ha ha! That was a good one, Uday. It's nice to know that you're not too busy with your 1,200 luxury automobiles to share a joke with the commoners now and again."

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Food
Hate Red M&M's? You Need a Candy Color-Sorting Machine
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iStock

You don’t have to be a demanding rock star to live a life without brown M&M's or purple Skittles—all you need is some engineering know-how and a little bit of free time.

Mechanical engineering student Willem Pennings created a machine that can take small pieces of candy—like M&M's, Skittles, Reese’s Pieces, etc.—and sort them by color into individual piles. All Pennings needs to do is pour the candy into the top funnel; from there, the machine separates the candy—around two pieces per second—and dispenses all of it into smaller bowls at the bottom designated for each variety.

The color identification is performed with an RGB sensor that takes “optical measurements” of candy pieces of equal dimensions. There are limitations, though, as Pennings revealed in a Reddit Q&A: “I wouldn't be able to use this machine for peanut M&M's, since the sizes vary so much.”

The entire building process lasted from May through December 2016, and included the actual conceptualization, 3D printing (which was outsourced), and construction. The entire project was detailed on Pennings’s website and Reddit's DIY page.

With all of the motors, circuitry, and hardware that went into it, Pennings’s machine is likely too ambitious of a task for the average candy aficionado. So until a machine like this hits the open market, you're probably stuck buying bags of single-colored M&M’s in bulk online or sorting all of the candy out yourself the old fashioned way.

To see Pennings’s machine in action, check out the video below:

[h/t Refinery 29]

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