6 of Oprah's Famous Feuds

Rachel Luna / Stringer / Getty Images Entertainment via Getty Images
Rachel Luna / Stringer / Getty Images Entertainment via Getty Images

Oprah Winfrey has been called the most powerful woman in the world, and since her syndicated talk show is broadcast in over 130 countries, it's not a ludicrous claim. It's only natural then, that someone so powerful would find herself ensnared in her fair share of controversies. Whether you think Oprah's a power-hungry witch or simply an easy target for anyone desperately seeking a quick burst of exposure, it's hard to argue that no matter who starts the feud, talk TV's queen always handles herself with grace and civility. (Well, most of the time.) And she usually wins. Here are a few of our favorites:

Oprah vs. Jonathan Franzen

Forget Harold Bloom; Oprah might be the world's most influential literary critic. When she picks a book for the Oprah's Book Club segment on her show, what publishers call "the Oprah Effect" kicks in, and sales can spike by upwards of a million copies. For most writers, that sort of enlarged audience and the accompanying royalties would be a dream.

For most writers who aren't Jonathan Franzen, that is. When Oprah chose Franzen's sweeping 2001 family drama The Corrections as a club selection, the author bristled. Franzen apparently didn't feel that his tome belonged in the company of the other selections, lamenting, "The problem in this case is some of Oprah's picks. She's picked some good books, but she's picked enough schmaltzy, one dimensional ones that I cringe, myself, even though I think she's really smart and she's really fighting the good fight." He also expressed discomfort at having the Oprah's Book Club logo on the novel's cover.

Oprah countered by revoking Franzen's invitation to appear on her show, although the novel was discussed by the book club. Although Franzen later admitted he felt awful about the whole episode, it proved that no elitist writer can win a fight with Oprah; the top result for an Amazon search for The Corrections returns the The Corrections (Oprah Edition).

Oprah vs. James Frey

If Oprah triumphed over Franzen, she absolutely dropped the hammer on James Frey, the author of the partially fabricated memoir A Million Little Pieces. Oprah selected the memoir as her book club selection for September 2005, and the paperback version immediately shot to the top of the New York Times' bestseller list for 15 straight weeks. All of the publicity wasn't great for Frey, though. After he appeared on the show to discuss the book, The Smoking Gun started digging around for his mug shot from an anecdote in the memoir in which Frey gets arrested. As it turned out, they couldn't find one because the incident never happened. Soon, the veracity of the whole book was under suspicion.

This hullabaloo obviously embarrassed Oprah since she'd brought the book into the spotlight in the first place. Frey appeared on Oprah's show again in January 2006 to explain himself and contend that the same drug addiction the memoir recounted led him to lie in his writing. Oprah would have none of his equivocating, though, and sternly chided Frey, "I feel you betrayed millions of readers."

She wasn't done, though. Oprah then had Nan Talese, Frey's publisher, defend the decision to market the book as a memoir. Under intense questioning from Oprah, Talese finally admitted that she hadn't actually fact checked the book. Talese would later viciously decry Oprah's "fiercely bad manners," but the damage was done. Winfrey had deftly humiliated both in front of her enormous TV audience.

Oprah vs. David Letterman

When Letterman hosted the 1995 Academy Awards, he made the infamously bad "Oprah, Uma; Uma, Oprah" joke in which he ostensibly introduced Winfrey to Uma Thurman. For most viewers, it was just thirty seconds of excruciatingly unfunny television. According to rumors, Oprah didn't find it funny, either, and what had previously been a cordial relationship in which Oprah had appeared on the comedian's show turned frosty.

Letterman exacerbated things by starting a running bit on his show he called the "Oprah Log," in which he kept a daily diary of whether or not he'd been invited to appear on her show. Every entry had the same answer: nope. Oprah later told Time that she was "completely uncomfortable" as the target of Letterman's jokes, and the rift widened.

In 2005, though, the pair finally patched things up, as Oprah appeared on Letterman's show before the premiere of the Broadway version of The Color Purple. Even against renowned comedians, Oprah always gets the last laugh, though. She needled Letterman with an on-air gift: a signed, framed photo of herself with Uma Thurman.

Oprah vs. Ludacris

When rapper/actor Ludacris appeared on Oprah's show in 2006 with his castmates from the film Crash, he probably expected a fairly soft interview to help garner attention for the film. Instead, Oprah singled him out and chastised him for using the words "bitches" and "ho's" in his rhymes. Ludacris was understandably perplexed by this treatment, which he said continued even after the show went off the air. He later accused Oprah of editing out his rebuttals and comments and leaving her own untouched. He told GQ, "Of course, it's her show, but we were doing a show on racial discrimination, and she gave me a hard time as a rapper when I came on there as an actor"¦It was like being at someone's house who doesn't really want you there."

Although rappers 50 Cent, Ice Cube, and Killer Mike have also publicly criticized Oprah for not supporting hip-hop, Oprah later told MTV, "I'm not opposed to rap. I'm opposed to being marginalized as a woman." It's tough to doubt her quote given its context; she gave the interview while attending the birthday party of Def Jam CEO L.A. Reid.

Oprah vs. Hermes

Oprah hasn't just had beefs with people; she's also taken on luxury designers. This story is shrouded in controversy, but a few facts seem to have emerged. In 2005, Oprah showed up at a Hermes boutique in Paris to buy a purse. Unfortunately, though, the store had already closed and denied her request to slip in to quickly buy the handbag. Oprah was supposedly livid about what she considered to be rude treatment and suspected that the denial was based on racism, and a public war of words broke out. Oprah contacted the U.S. head of Hermes to relay her side of the story. The company maintained that she'd simply run into an overly rigid employee who didn't recognize her and failed to bend the rules as was common for celebrity customers. (Whatever the employee's actual motivation was, he certainly didn't display much business sense; the Birkin handbag Oprah wanted to sneak in to purchase retailed for over $6,000.)

As rumors raged that Oprah wanted viewers to boycott Hermes, she squashed the controversy with her usual flair by inviting Hermes' U.S. chief Robert Chavez on the show. She explained to Chavez that she was just upset over the rude treatment of a single employee. Chavez offered a sincere apology, and Oprah encouraged views to buy their own Birkin bags.

Oprah vs. Angelina Jolie

Oprah's legendary philanthropy nearly matches her fame, and one of her recent projects is the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa. The boarding school is devoted to finding academically gifted low-income girls in South Africa and then nurturing their leadership abilities. Obviously, Oprah's pursuing a noble goal with the project, and she occasionally looks to other celebrities for help with promoting the school. Knowing that Angelina Jolie has a deep and abiding love for Africa, Oprah invited her to lend a hand in promoting the school. Jolie supposedly flatly refused. She was apparently still peeved that Oprah had sided with Jennifer Aniston in Aniston's breakup with Jolie's beau Brad Pitt. This one hasn't had any resolution yet, but you can be sure of one thing: when the dust clears, Oprah's going to come out on top.

Ethan Trex grew up idolizing Vince Coleman, and he kind of still does. Ethan co-writes Straight Cash, Homey, the Internet's undisputed top source for pictures of people in Ryan Leaf jerseys.

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Take Two: When Kim Jong-il Raised North Korea's World Cinema Profile By Kidnapping Two South Korean Stars

Kim Jong-Il, Choi Eun-hie, and Shin Sang-ok in a scene from Ross Adam and Robert Cannan's The Lovers & the Despot (2016).
Kim Jong-Il, Choi Eun-hie, and Shin Sang-ok in a scene from Ross Adam and Robert Cannan's The Lovers & the Despot (2016).
Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

Choi Eun-hee knew there was trouble even before the needle sent her into unconsciousness.

It was 1978, and Choi, one of South Korea’s most prominent actresses, was struggling to regain the success she had achieved earlier in her career. A promise of a possible film partnership by a man claiming to be from Hong Kong had lured her to Repulse Bay, a waterfront locale in the southern part of Hong Kong Island, where she exited a vehicle and noticed a group of men standing near a boat. Choi sensed something wasn't quite right, but before she could consider it any further, she was grabbed, sedated, and thrown onboard.

When she awoke, Choi found herself in the captain’s quarters. Above her was a portrait of Kim Jong-il, then the chief of North Korea’s Propaganda and Agitation Department. Kim’s father, Kim Il-sung, was the leader of the country, a communist regime that had now seemingly absconded with Choi—for reasons the actress couldn't imagine.

Roughly eight days after being kidnapped, Choi found herself in Pyongyang, where Kim greeted her not as someone who had been forcibly subdued and delivered to him, but as an honored guest. In a way, she was. In Kim’s mind, Choi and her ex-husband, award-winning film director Shin Sang-ok (who would soon join them, also involuntarily) were the very people the country needed to spearhead a new era in North Korean filmmaking, one that would make the entire world sit up and take notice.

That both Choi and Shin would be captives of the state was of little concern to those in charge. Regardless of how their guests got there, they were there. And Kim had no intention of letting them leave.

 

Kim, who eventually succeeded his father as leader of North Korea and ruled from 1994 until his death in 2011, was a movie buff. He reportedly owned more than 30,000 films—including a great deal of pornography—and ordered traveling diplomats to bring back copies of international films for his enjoyment. Kim even authored a book, 1973’s On the Art of Cinema, that was intended as an instructional guide for filmmakers in the country. He preached a devotion to a singular, unified vision and bemoaned that North Korean films had too much ideology and crying in them. All but ignored by the rest of the film world, Kim wanted the North producing features that would be embraced by film festivals.

Kim Jong-il loved movies so much he decided to abduct some talent.Getty Images (Kim Jong-il) // JurgaR/iStock via Getty Images (Movie Theater). Photo composite by Mental Floss.

At the time, it was not uncommon for North Korea to fill a need for trained workers simply by kidnapping them. It had worked for the country when they wanted to learn more about South Korea; between 1977 and 1978, they abducted five South Korean high school students who became instructors for future undercover Northern operatives. They also once attempted to kidnap a concert pianist, who grew wise to the situation when he arrived for his private appointment and heard several people speaking with North Korean accents. (He fled.) Even so, Kim used a similar strategy when he decided that kidnapping an actor and director would be the most effective way to achieve his movie aspirations.

Choi was only one part of the plan. Once she was grabbed, Shin began a desperate search for her. The two, who had once been considered a “golden couple” in South Korea, had divorced in 1976 following Shin's affair with a younger actress, but they remained close.

Of course, Shin was a cinematic superstar in his own right. Though his career had also recently cooled off, he was a celebrated director who had once been referred to as "the Orson Welles of South Korea." Though there are different stories as to how Shin ended up in North Korea, the official version is that he wanted to help locate his missing ex. And when that trail eventually led him to Hong Kong, Shin, too, soon found himself with a bag over his head, being hustled to Pyongyang. While Choi had resigned herself to some acceptance of her fate—she was living in a luxurious villa surrounded by guards—Shin was more combative. After numerous escape attempts, he was sent to prison.

For four years, Shin subsisted on a diet of grass, salt, and rice, never once seeing Choi or getting any update about her safety. As far as Shin knew, she was dead. Finally, in 1983, Shin was released and “invited” to a reception. To their mutual shock, the former couple was reunited, neither one knowing the other had been there the entire time.

Kim apologized for the delayed meeting, saying he had been busy. On the subject of Shin being imprisoned for four years, he dismissed it as a misunderstanding. It was only then that Kim explained why the two were there: North Korean filmmakers had no new ideas, he explained, so he wanted Shin and Choi to make films that would establish North Korea in the movie business.

None of it was presented as a choice. That same year, the couple remarried—also reportedly at Kim's suggestion.

The filmmakers spent years trapped in North Korea.NatanaelGinting/iStock via Getty Images

There was discussion of escape, particularly when the couple was allowed to travel to Berlin to scout locations for productions, but Shin dismissed it.

"What's the matter with you?" Shin recalled telling Choi in his 1988 memoir, Kingdom of Kim. "I will not make an attempt unless it's 100 percent certain. If they caught us, we'd be dead."

Instead, Shin pondered the opportunity. Kim gave him the equivalent of $3 million as an annual salary, for both personal and professional use. His production offices grew to more than 700 employees. Aside from some firm edicts—Kim wanted to project an image of North Korea as a political titan, while somehow softening its image as a totalitarian terror—Shin had a large degree of creative freedom. He filmed North Korea’s first onscreen kiss. He made Runaway, a 1984 film about a wandering Korean family in 1920s Manchuria, that Shin believed was the best film of his career.

Most famously, he directed Pulgasari, a monster movie clearly inspired by Godzilla that featured an oversized monster aiding an army of farmers looking to overthrow a cruel king. Kim even convinced several filmmakers who worked on the Godzilla films to come to North Korea to assist with the production by guaranteeing their safety. Kenpachiro Satsuma, who was the second person to wear the Godzilla suit, performed as Pulgasari. Thousands of North Korean soldiers were used as extras.

 

Kim was very happy with the work Shin and Choi were producing, which grew to seven films. Some had even made it to festivals in the Eastern Bloc. Gradually, he gave them more and more freedom to travel, eventually allowing them to take an escorted trip to Vienna in 1986 to help stir up a possible European distributor that would make a North Korean film easier to circulate. As they were preparing to leave for Austria, the two decided to act.

"To be in Korea living a good life ourselves and enjoying movies while everyone else was not free was not happiness, but agony," Shin wrote.

Choi Eun-hee and Shin Sang-ok in The Lovers & the Despot (2016).Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

The two got in touch with a Japanese film critic they knew and met him for lunch. With North Korean guards in pursuit, Shin and Choi took a taxi to the American embassy and explained their eight-year ordeal as creative captives of Kim. Within a week, they were telling their story to reporters in Baltimore, Maryland, as well as the CIA.

North Korea denied that the two had been there against their will, arguing that they simply wanted to escape the restrictive nature of South Korean filmmaking. But Choi had seen to it that they came back with evidence. She had snuck an audio cassette recorder into her handbag during one meeting with Kim, who advised that if they were ever asked what they were doing in North Korea, to say that they were there voluntarily. She had even managed to have the tape smuggled out of the country before escaping, a stunt that could have resulted in her death if the betrayal had been discovered. For those in the U.S. government gathering intelligence on North Korea, it was the first time Kim’s voice had ever been heard.

Shin and Choi remained in the United States, where they had been granted political asylum. Shin even directed the 1995 film Three Ninjas Knuckle Up and produced several more movies under the pseudonym Simon Sheen. They eventually returned to South Korea in 1999, though some South Koreans believed Shin had gone to the North and pledged allegiance to communism voluntarily and treated him with suspicion.

"I could not dare return [to South Korea] without evidence that I had been kidnapped to the North," Shin said in an interview. "If [the Seoul government] charged me with entering the North on my own and cooperating with the North Koreans, I would have had no evidence to deny it."

Shin and Choi's story was explored in depth in Ross Adam and Robert Cannan's documentary The Lovers & the Despot, which was nominated for a Grand Jury Prize at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival.

Shin died in 2006, Choi in 2018. In a 2015 interview with Korea JoongAng Daily, Choi said that she still had nightmares about being pursued by North Korean agents. "Even though [Kim Jong-il] did not use the right means to get what he wanted, I understood his desire to develop the North Korean movie industry," she said. "He mentioned that he wanted to bring about change to North Korean movies, all of which were similar in terms of directing and acting. But please don't misunderstand that my forgiveness of him means that I agree with the North Korean system, because I don't."

Though North Korea never did admit to abducting the pair, in 2002 Kim Jong-il did come clean about snatching several Japanese tourists in the late 1970s and 1980s, and issued a formal apology.

When it finally received a wider release, Pulgasari was dismissed as silly. Now under the leadership of Kim Jong-un, North Korea has yet to make any impact on the international film scene.