7 Things You Should Know About The Indy 500

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Most Americans only pay attention to open-wheel racing one Sunday out of the year. Although the sport doesn't have a Nascar-like spot in the country's heart, the Indianapolis 500 manages to generate fan interest—only fitting for an event that's nicknamed "The Greatest Spectacle in Racing." Whether this year's 92nd running of the Indy 500 is your first time watching the race or a beloved annual tradition, the great spectacle may have a few confusing moments. We've tried to answer some of the inevitable questions for you.

Why is the Indianapolis Motor Speedway called "the Brickyard"?
Because the original racing surface of the track didn't work. When the Speedway opened in 1909, its track was made of crushed stone and tar. This mixture was even less functional than it sounds; when racing started several drivers suffered fatal crashes due to the unstable track. The Speedway's owners wanted to address this problem quickly, so they replaced the track with 3.2 million paving bricks. Thus, the track was nicknamed "the Brickyard."

By 1936, though, the bricks were starting to wear down, and certain patches were paved over. Repairs gradually covered more bricks until 1961, when pavers covered the rest of the track, leaving only a three-foot strip of brick at the start/finish line. This narrow swath of bricks is till visible on the track, although the bricks themselves are occasionally switched out due to wear. In 1996, Nascar driver Dale Jarrett and his crew gave birth to a new tradition when they kissed the bricks after winning the Brickyard 400, the track's premiere stock-car race. Indy 500 winners have since taken to smooching the masonry, starting with Gil de Ferran after his 2003 win.

What the heck is a Carb Day?

Indy 500 preparations are known as "the Month of May" in racing circles because of the painstaking work that goes into perfecting each car before the green flag drops. Due to the long lead-in time, many of the pre-race days have nicknames and have become events of their own.

Since the field is limited to 33 cars, drivers must qualify for a spot in the race. The pole day qualifying determines not just who will drive in the race, but in what position they'll start. The final practice day before qualifying is known as "Fast Friday," because teams really open up their cars and take the speediest practice laps they can.

"Fast Friday" is followed by the Pole Day time trials in which drivers vie for starting their sports and starting positions in the race. When the dust settled after Pole Day this year, Scott Dixon had claimed the top starting spot in the race; he pocketed a cool $100,000 just for winning the pole.

After two more days of qualifying comes "bump day," or the last day of qualifying. Once 33 drivers have posted qualifying times to fill out the field, any driver who then wants to earn a spot in the race has to post a qualifying time faster than the slowest qualifier currently in the field. The slowest driver is then "bumped" out of the field.

The Friday before the race is known as Carb Day. Carburetion Day, as it was originally known, historically gave teams a chance to calibrate their carburetors for race-day conditions. However, due to the rise of fuel injection no car with a carburetor has been in the field since 1963, and today Carb Day is largely a final chance for drivers to practice in their race-day cars. Pit crews also compete in a pit stop challenge competition on Carb Day.

What songs are sung before the race?
The Purdue University All-American Marching Band plays a number of signature songs before each year's race, including "Stars and Stripes Forever" and Indiana's state song, "On the Banks of the Wabash." The signature song, though, is "Back Home Again in Indiana," a beloved tribute to the Hoosier state. The song itself might not be familiar to you, but the crooner who belts it out probably is. Jim Nabors, who played Gomer Pyle on The Andy Griffith Show and Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., has performed the song most years since 1972. Illness kept him out of last year's race, but he's set to make a triumphant return this year. Since the 1940s, organizers have also released thousands of balloons from an infield tent during the singing of "Back Home Again in Indiana," adding an extra visual flair to the tradition.

If that's not enough Nick-at-Nite-era sitcom star power for you, then you'll be pleased to learn that Florence Henderson, native Hoosier and matriarch of The Brady Bunch, will once again sing "God Bless America," a song she's performed every year since the early 1990s. [Image courtesy of The Peterson Family.]

Why are the cars moving at the race's start?
Although rolling starts are common in racing now, Indy 500 organizers claim the use of a pace car originated with the race's first running in 1911. Speedway founder Carl Fisher was supposedly worried that having the large field of racers start from a dead stop would be dangerous, so he suggested that the drivers take a lap at a low speed behind a pace car. At the end of this practice lap, the pace car would leave the track, and the race would begin. The tradition has gradually changed; the pace car now leads the standard 33-car field on two unofficial "parade laps," then on the race's first lap, which is known as the "pace lap."

Although it originated as a safety precaution, the pace car has found its way into Indy's pageantry. The pace car is usually a particularly snazzy American ride (the most frequently used car is the Corvette), and the winner is ceremonially given the keys to a replica following his win. Celebrities have taken the driving duties for the pace car; in recent years Morgan Freeman, Lance Armstrong, and Colin Powell have been behind the wheel. This year two-time winner Emerson Fittipaldi will set the pace in a 2008 Corvette.

What's the deal with the gigantic trophy?
"Gigantic" might actually be an understated description of the Borg-Warner Trophy, which has been awarded to the race's winner since 1936. The sterling silver trophy, which is named after American auto part supply company BorgWarner, stands over five feet tall and weighs over 150 pounds. (In other words, it's taller and heavier than Danica Patrick.) The trophy contains a bas-relief sculpture of every winning driver in Indy 500 history, as well as a gold sculpture of Tony Hulman, the late owner of the racetrack. It's topped with a sculpture of a naked track marshal waving a checkered flag, a sight that's all too familiar to anyone who's ever tried to make a race marshal put on some pants.

Was the trophy always so huge?
No. But in 1986, race organizers ran out of room to put future winners' faces. A large extension was added at the base; it provides ample room to sculpt the winners of every race until 2034. Due to the trophy's value and enormous heft, the winner doesn't actually get to keep it for the year. Instead, since 1988 drivers have been given an 18-inch replica as a memento of their victories.

Why does the winner chug milk in victory lane?
This tradition exists because three-time winner Louis Meyer was an obedient son. Meyer's mom had told him to drink buttermilk on warm days to cool down. Meyer made a habit of it, and a photographer snapped a picture when he took a long slug of milk in victory lane after winning the 1936 race. An enterprising dairy industry executive saw the picture in the paper and decided to make a bottle of milk part of the standard victory celebration. The tradition got off to a slow start, but it's been an Indy 500 mainstay since 1955. The American Dairy Association now pays a sponsorship to the winner for giving milk such a prime endorsement.

There has been at least one notable exception, though. When Emerson Fittipaldi took the checkered flag in 1993, he eschewed milk in favor of a bottle of orange juice. Was he just confusing his breakfast drinks? Possibly, but some suspected he was trying to boost orange juice consumption since he owned orange groves in his native Brazil. He eventually drank some milk after the orange juice, but later apologized for breaking tradition and donated the dairy sponsorship money to a women's charity.

Ethan Trex grew up idolizing Vince Coleman, and he kind of still does. Ethan co-writes Straight Cash, Homey, the Internet's undisputed top source for pictures of people in Ryan Leaf jerseys.

Kitty O'Neil, Trailblazing Speed Racer and Wonder Woman's Stunt Double

PHOTO COLLAGE BY DAMON AMATO, MINUTE MEDIA. MOTORCYCLE/CAR/DIVINGBOARD, ISTOCK VIA GETTY IMAGES. PORTRAIT, MIDCO SPORTS MAGAZINE // YOUTUBE
PHOTO COLLAGE BY DAMON AMATO, MINUTE MEDIA. MOTORCYCLE/CAR/DIVINGBOARD, ISTOCK VIA GETTY IMAGES. PORTRAIT, MIDCO SPORTS MAGAZINE // YOUTUBE

Kitty O’Neil could do it all. A stuntwoman, drag racer, and diver, the legendary daredevil's skills were once described by the Chicago Tribune as “full and partial engulfment in fire; swimming; diving; water skiing; scuba diving; horse falls, jumps, drags, and transfers; high falls into an air bag or water; car rolls; cannon-fired car driving; motorcycle racing; speed, drag, sail, and power boat handling; fight routines; gymnastics; snow skiing; jet skiing; sky diving; ice skating; golf; tennis; track and field; 10-speed bike racing; and hang gliding.”

During her lifetime, O’Neil set 22 speed records on both the land and sea—including the women’s land speed record of 512 mph, which remains unmatched to this day. Through it all, she battled casual sexism and ableism, as she was often not only the lone woman in the room, but the lone deaf person on the drag strip or movie set.

"It Wasn't Scary Enough for Me"

O’Neil was born on March 24, 1946, in Corpus Christi, Texas. Her father, John, was an Air Force pilot and oil driller, while her mother, Patsy, was a homemaker. When she was just a few months old, O’Neil contracted mumps, measles, and smallpox, an onslaught of illness that damaged her nerves and caused her to lose her hearing. Patsy, who had packed her in ice during the worst of the fever, went back to school for speech pathology so she could teach her daughter how to read lips and form words. She placed the young girl’s hand on her throat as she spoke, allowing her to feel the vibrations of her vocal cords.

Feeling those sensations helped Kitty learn to talk, while the sensations associated with engines would teach her something else. At the age of 4, O’Neil convinced her father to let her ride atop the lawn mower in what would be a transformative experience. “I could feel the vibrations,” she told the Associated Press. “That’s what got me into racing. When I race, I feel the vibrations.”

But racing wasn’t her first thrill ride. As a teenager, O’Neil showed such an aptitude for diving that Patsy decided to move the family to Anaheim, California, where O’Neil could train with the two-time Olympic gold medalist Sammy Lee. She was on her way to the qualifying rounds for the 1964 Tokyo Olympics when she broke her wrist, eliminating her from consideration. Soon after, she contracted spinal meningitis. Her doctors worried she wouldn’t walk again.

She recovered, but found she was no longer interested in diving. “I gave it up because it wasn’t scary enough for me,” she told the Chicago Tribune.

Motorcycle racing proved to be a better adrenaline rush, so she began entering competitions along the West Coast. It was at one of those races that she met another speedster named Ronald “Duffy” Hambleton, who offered his assistance after O’Neil crashed her bike, severing two fingers. Once she had gotten stitched up, the pair began a professional and romantic relationship. O’Neil moved onto a 40-acre ranch in Fillmore, California, with Hambleton and his two children from a previous relationship.

Hambleton would act as O’Neil’s manager, often speaking to the press for her after stunts or record attempts. However, O’Neil later alleged that he stole money from her and physically abused her during their partnership. In 1988, a Star Tribune reporter would describe O’Neil’s scrapbooks as containing a photo of Hambleton with his face scratched out; she had also written “not true” in the margins of newspaper clippings touting his profound impact on her success.

The Need for Speed

O’Neil wanted to go fast and she didn’t care how. So she expanded her scope beyond motorcycles, setting a new women’s water skiing record in 1970 with a speed of 104.85 mph. Her national breakout arrived six years later, when she drove a skinny three-wheel rocket car into the Alvord Desert. The hydrogen peroxide-powered vehicle was dubbed “The Motivator,” and it was the work of William Fredrick, a designer who normally created cars for movie and TV stunts. When O’Neil got behind the wheel of The Motivator, she quickly smashed the women’s land speed record. Her average speed was 512 mph, over 1.5 times faster than the previous 321 mph record held by Lee Breedlove since 1965.

She believed she could beat the men’s record of 631.4 mph, too, which should’ve been great news for her entire team. Fredrick and his corporate sponsors were gunning for a new record, and O'Neil had already reportedly hit a maximum speed of 618 mph in her initial run. But before she could take The Motivator for a second spin, she was ordered out of the car.

As O’Neil would discover, she had only been contracted to beat the women’s record. Marvin Glass & Associates, the toy company that owned the rights to the vehicle, wanted Hollywood stuntman Hal Needham to break the men’s record. The company claimed it was purely a business decision, as they had a Needham action figure in the works. But according to Hambleton, the company reps had said it would be “unbecoming and degrading for a woman to set a land speed record.”

“It really hurts,” O’Neil told UPI reporters as she choked back tears. “I wanted to do it again. I had a good feeling.” She earned the immediate support of the men’s record holder, Gary Gabelich, who called the whole incident “ridiculous” and “kind of silly.” She and Hambleton tried to sue for her right to another attempt, but she wouldn’t get a second ride in The Motivator. Needham wouldn’t break the record, either, as a storm dampened his chances. Not that he was especially polite about it.

“Hell, you’re not talking about sports when you’re talking about land speed records,” he told the Chicago Tribune. “It doesn’t take any God-given talent … even a good, smart chimpanzee could probably do it. Probably better—because he wouldn’t be worried about dying.”

As the messy legal battle dragged on, O’Neil focused on her budding career in stunt work. According to The New York Times, she completed her first stunt in March of 1976, when she zipped up a flame-resistant Nomex suit and let someone set her on fire. For her second job, she rolled a car, which was practically a personal hobby. (She liked to tell people she rolled her mother’s car when she was 16, the day she got her driver’s license.) O’Neil eventually became Lynda Carter’s stunt double on Wonder Woman, where she famously leapt 127 feet off a hotel roof onto an air bag below. “If I hadn’t hit the center of the bag, I probably would have been killed,” she told The Washington Post in 1979.

Her work earned her a place in Stunts Unlimited, the selective trade group that had, until that point, only admitted men. O’Neil continued racking up credits with gigs on The Bionic Woman, Smokey and the Bandit II, and The Blues Brothers. Although few stunt doubles achieve name recognition, O’Neil was a media darling who inspired her own 1979 TV movie starring Stockard Channing and a Barbie in her trademark yellow jumpsuit.

A Pioneer's Legacy

But by 1982, feeling burned out after watching the toll the work had taken on colleagues, O'Neil decided she was finished. She retired from the business at the age of 36, packing up and leaving Los Angeles entirely. She wound up in Minneapolis and then in Eureka, South Dakota, a town with a population of fewer than 1000 people. She would live out the rest of her days there, eventually dying of pneumonia in 2018 at the age of 72.

O’Neil lived her life as a never-ending challenge—to go faster, jump higher, do better. She always said that her lack of hearing helped her concentrate, eliminating any fear she might’ve felt over the prospect of breaking the sound barrier, let alone self-immolation.

“When I was 18, I was told I couldn’t get a job because I was deaf,” she told a group of deaf students at the Holy Trinity School in Chicago. “But I said someday I’m going to be famous in sports, to show them I can do anything.”

O’Neil did exactly that. Over her the course of perilous career, she carved out a name for herself in a space that was often openly hostile towards her, setting records and making it impossible for anyone who doubted her to catch up.

43 Fast Facts About Field of Dreams

Amy Madigan and Kevin Costner star as Annie and Ray Kinsella in Field of Dreams (1989).
Amy Madigan and Kevin Costner star as Annie and Ray Kinsella in Field of Dreams (1989).
Universal Pictures

If you have seen Field of Dreams, you likely have a strong opinion on it. While some are moved by its fantastical and heartfelt story of personal redemption, others dismiss it as maudlin and silly, or a "male weepie at its wussiest," as Richard Corliss of TIME Magazine once infamously put it. Either way you look at it, the Oscar-nominated movie—which made its debut on May 5, 1989—is still being talked about 30 years after its release.

1. Field of Dreams was based on a book called Shoeless Joe.

Field of Dreams writer-director Phil Alden Robinson had loved W.P. Kinsella's Shoeless Joe since the book was first published in 1982. Despite 20th Century Fox's repeated insistence through the years that the story wasn't commercial enough to be adapted into a movie, Robinson continued working on a script for it. Eventually Robinson and producers Lawrence and Charles Gordon sold the screenplay to Universal.

2. Shoeless Joe evolved from a short story.

Ray Liotta in 'Field of Dreams' (1989)
Ray Liotta stars as Shoeless Joe Jackson in Field of Dreams (1989).
Universal Pictures

Before Shoeless Joe, there was “Shoeless Joe Jackson Comes to Iowa,” a 20-page short story that W.P. Kinsella penned for an anthology. When Larry Kessenich—an editor at Houghton Mifflin—read the synopsis, he contacted Kinsella and convinced him to turn the premise into a full-length novel. “I wrote back to say I would need guidance, as I had published four collections of short stories but had never written a publishable novel," Kinsella said.

3. It took W.P. Kinsella just nine months to write the book.

While Shoeless Joe may have been Kinsella's first novel, he finished it rather quickly. With Kessenich’s help, this new extended version of the story was completed in the span of nine months.

4. Phil Alden Robinson was upset that the studio wouldn’t let him use the title Shoeless Joe.

When Field of Dreams was first shown to test audiences, it was using the title Shoeless Joe. Audiences said it reminded them of a hobo. With trepidation, Robinson called Kinsella to tell him that the movie's name was being changed to Field of Dreams. Kinsella was ok with it, as one of his own ideas for his book's title was The Dream Field. It was apparently his publisher who pushed for Shoeless Joe.

5. A few characters from Shoeless Joe were omitted from the Field of Dreams script.

In the Shoeless Joe novel, we’re introduced Eddie “Kid” Scissions, the previous owner of Ray’s farm. An elderly Iowan, Scissons claims to be the “oldest living Chicago Cub,” but soon enough, Ray learns he never even suited up for the team. “It was a wonderful subplot,” Robinson said, “[but] we couldn’t find room for it.” Another character cut out of Robinson’s screenplay was Richard Kinsella, Ray’s identical twin brother.

6. In the book, J.D. Salinger was the author Ray Kinsella tries to kidnap.

W.P. Kinsella's real original title for his book was The Kidnapping of J.D. Salinger. Studio executives, however, were afraid that bad publicity from Salinger's threats to file a lawsuit would harm them, so the character of Terence Mann was created instead.

7. Ray Kinsella was named after a J.D. Salinger character.

A photo of J.D. Salinger
Wikimedia Commons

W.P. Kinsella insists he didn't just put his own last name as Ray's and call it a day. Kinsella was a last name Salinger used in two stories: Richard Kinsella was an annoying classmate of Holden Caulfield in The Catcher In the Rye, and Ray Kinsella was a character in the short story A Young Girl in 1941 With No Waist at All. The idea was for a Salinger creation to appear in front of his creator and take him to a ballgame.

8. An outfield fence was considered, but never built, for Field of Dreams.

Here’s another difference between Kinsella’s novel and its Hollywood adaptation. “In the book, there’s a fence with a door in it that separates the ball field from the corn field, and we had done drawings of walls and fences” Robinson explained in a discussion with sportswriters Stephen C. Wood and J. David Pincus. “I asked, ‘Why would he build a fence?’ and then the corn became the wall.”

9. Kevin Costner wasn't initially considered for Field of Dreams because he had just starred in Bull Durham.

Kevin Costner and Tim Robbins in Bull Durham (1988)
Tim Robbins and Kevin Costner face off in Bull Durham (1988).
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.

Kevin Costner was the first actor to come to Robinson's mind to play Ray, but he had just starred in Bull Durham, another baseball movie. A Universal executive got Costner to read the script anyway, and he decided to do it because he felt it would be akin to It's a Wonderful Life.

10. W.P. Kinsella and his wife almost appeared in Field of Dreams.

Kinsella and his wife were in the crowd for a scene of a PTA meeting, which was shot at a gymnasium in Farley, Iowa. “My wife and I were part of the audience at the PTA scene,” Kinsella later said. “We were trapped there for a full day of sweltering retakes, and we never appeared in the final cut.”

11. Ben Affleck and Matt Damon were extras in Field of Dreams.

Damon was 17 years old and Affleck turned 16 during the summer of 1988, when the film shot on location for the scenes in Fenway Park. More than a decade later Affleck would star in Robinson's The Sum of All Fears; on the first day of shooting, he reportedly told Robinson: "Nice working with you again."

12. There’s a Watergate Easter egg in Field of Dreams.

A portrait of 37th president Richard Nixon
Keystone/Getty Images

While walking through the streets of Chisholm, Minnesota, Ray spots a campaign poster for Richard Nixon in a storefront window. Guess what’s on display right behind it? An assortment of tape recorders. “I thought that was so clever, but in the film print you can’t actually see [the recorders],” Robinson said in 2013. However, they’re clear as day in digital editions of the movie.

13. The person who voiced "The Voice" that spoke to Ray in Field of Dreams remains a mystery.

For years it was rumored that the voiced belonged to Ray Liotta, who played Shoeless Joe Jackson. Kinsella wrote that he was told it was actually Ed Harris, Amy Madigan's husband (Madigan played Ray's wife, Annie).

"What’s funny is that a few people who thought they knew have revealed it and gotten it wrong," Robinson said in June 2019. "I’ll read people saying, ‘Well I happen to know that it’s so-and-so,’ and I’m like, ‘Oh no, it’s not!’ We’ll let that remain a secret. It’s a great mystery, and I like that.” The Voice is officially credited as being played by Himself.

14. A deleted scene from Field of Dreams sees Ray getting his hearing checked.

Before Ray starts obeying the mysterious voice that's speaking to him, he tries to find a logical explanation for it. “I … had a scene in which he goes to an ear doctor to have his hearing checked,” Robinson told Deadline. Ultimately, this footage wound up on the cutting room floor.

15. People regularly misquote Field of Dreams’s most famous line.

The actual quote is: "If you build it, he will come," not "If you build it, they will come." It's a common mistake. The line was ranked number 39 on AFI's 100 Greatest Movie Quotes of All Time.

16. The grass was painted green for Field of Dreams.

Filmed on an actual cornfield-turned-baseball diamond in Dyersville, Iowa, a season-long drought led to the need for some cosmetic touch-ups. The dying grass was coated with some green vegetable dye and latex turf paint.

17. James Earl Jones's wife told him his "people will come" speech would never make the final cut.

It was James Earl Jones's wife who convinced him to accept the role of Terence Mann in the first place, though she warned him that the "long speech about baseball will never be in the film, it'll be on the cutting-room floor."

18. James Earl Jones reunited with a former Broadway co-star while shooting Field of Dreams.

Back in 1958, Jones made his Broadway debut in a stage production of Sunrise at Campobello. One of his castmates in that show was Anne Seymour, who portrays the Chisolm newspaperwoman in Field of Dreams. This was to be her last role, as she died shortly before the movie’s release. “It was nice to have that moment with Anne,” Jones told the Des Moines Register in 2019.

19. Moonlight Graham is a real person.

Kinsella used Archibald Moonlight Graham's real life story for his book, with the exception that the real Graham's lone major league game took place on June 1905, not on the last day of the 1922 season like Burt Lancaster's character in the film. The author found Graham's name in a baseball encyclopedia he received as a Christmas gift and decided the name was better than anything he could ever come up with on his own. In real life, Graham became the beloved town doctor of Chisholm, Minnesota after answering a newspaper ad.

20. Moonlight Graham’s on-screen uniform in Field of Dreams is a little anachronistic.

Late in the film, a young Graham takes the field in an orange and black New York Giants jersey. This isn’t quite period-accurate: The Giants didn’t start wearing those uniform colors until 1933—long after Graham’s MLB career wrapped up.

21. Jimmy Stewart was the first choice to play Moonlight Graham in Field of Dreams.

Jimmy Stewart in Alfred Hitchock's 'Rear Window' (1954)
Jimmy Stewart in Alfred Hitchock's Rear Window (1954).
Universal Pictures Home Entertainment

Jimmy Stewart passed on the role. Burt Lancaster himself initially didn't "get it," but a friend convinced by him to take the part. In Roger Ebert's four-star review of the movie, he said Field of Dreams was "the kind of movie Frank Capra might have directed and James Stewart might have starred in."

22. Field of Dreams quotes Moonlight Graham’s actual obituary.

When the real Graham died in 1965, Veda Ponikvar—the founder of the Chisolm Free Press and Tribune—wrote a stirring tribute. “There were times when children could not afford eyeglasses or milk or clothing,” noted Ponikvar at the time. “Yet no child was ever denied these essentials because in the background there was always Dr. Graham. Without any fanfare or publicity, the glasses or the milk or the tickets to the ballgame found their way into the child’s pocket.” In Field of Dreams, Anne Seymour recites those lines word-for-word.

23. Field of Dreams was Burt Lancaster's last film to play in theaters.

Oscar-winning actor Burt Lancaster was 74 years old during the filming of Field of Dreams. After a couple of TV movie jobs, Lancaster retired from acting. He passed away in 1994.

24. Field of Dreams was Gaby Hoffmann's first movie.

Kevin Costner, Gaby Hoffmann, and Burt Lancaster in 'Field of Dreams' (1989)
Kevin Costner, Gaby Hoffmann, and Burt Lancaster in Field of Dreams (1989).
Universal Pictures

Gaby Hoffmann, the daughter of Andy Warhol superstar Viva Auder Hoffmann and soap actor Anthony Herrera, played Ray's daughter Karin at age six. More recently, you may have seen her in Transparent or Girls.

25. The filming schedule for Field of Dreams was based on the height of the corn.

The corn had to be Kevin Costner's height (he's listed as 6'1") or taller when the voice first spoke to him. With a thumbs up from the state of Iowa, filmmakers dammed a nearby creek to make sure the corn had enough water. It worked almost too well; when Costner first hears "If you build it, he will come," he had to walk onto a foot-high platform. Just in case the creek damming failed, fake corn was on standby to be shipped in from Asia.

26. Field of Dreams’s corn-based schedule upset the powers-that-be on another Kevin Costner movie.

Production on Tony Scott's Revenge was repeatedly postponed while Costner and the cast and crew of Field of Dreams were working with the vegetation. A producer threatened to sue the actor, until it was agreed that Costner would start work on Revenge two days after Field of Dreams wrapped. Revenge ended up making less than $16 million at the box office, while Field of Dreams raked in more than $64 million.

27. Field of Dreams’s composer James Horner was moved to tears by a rough cut of the film.

A still from 'Field of Dreams' (1989)
Universal Pictures

Before composer James Horner, the musical maestro behind Titanic and Braveheart, agreed to score Field of Dreams, Robinson gave him a private test-screening. “He came to look at it at an early stage,” Robinson said on a DVD bonus feature. “We showed him the film and when the lights came up, he got up and left the room.” At first, Robinson was crestfallen, thinking Horner must’ve hated the film. But a few moments later, the Oscar-winning composer—who passed away in 2015—came back “very teary-eyed” and agreed to take the job.

28. Field of Dreams star Ray Liotta has never seen the movie.

Though Ray Liotta has been told that Field of Dreams is a great movie, he has yet to see it for himself. Liotta's mother was ill while they were filming the movie, which he mentally associates with the movie.

29. Ray Liotta thought the Field of Dreams script was "silly."

Frank Whaley and Ray Liotta in 'Field of Dreams' (1989)
Frank Whaley and Ray Liotta in Field of Dreams (1989).
Universal Pictures

It was only after the actor read the script a couple more times and read the book Shoeless Joe that it made more sense to him.

30. Former USC baseball coach Rod Dedeaux was a consultant on Field of Dreams.

The USC Trojans men’s baseball team claimed 11 national championships under Dedaux, who passed away in 2006. While Field of Dreams was in production, he and Don Buford (a major league veteran) helped the actors refine their playing skills. Some of them didn’t need much assistance: According to ESPN’s Jeff Merron, Dedeaux thought Costner “would’ve been good enough to play at USC.”

31. Ray Liotta couldn't hit left-handed well enough for Field of Dreams.

Shoeless Joe Jackson hit lefty and threw righty, but in the movie Liotta plays him as a right-handed batter. Liotta trained with professional baseball coaches for one month to hit left-handed like his character, but it wasn't good enough for the director Robinson. Liotta claimed Robinson said it was okay if the batting wasn't historically accurate, though to this day the actor regrets not finding a way to make it work.

32. Shoeless Joe Jackson and Ty Cobb were on friendly terms in real life.

Ty Cobb & Joe Jackson standing alongside each other, each holding bats
Ty Cobb and "Shoeless" Joe Jackson
Louis Van Oeyen, Library of Congress // Public Domain, Wikimedia Commons

Despite being one of the first inductees to the National Baseball Hall of Fame, Detroit Tigers legend Tyrus “Ty” Cobb never shows up at Ray’s magical park. “None of us could stand the son of a bitch when we were alive, so we told him to stick it,” Shoeless Joe says in the film. Yet the two players actually liked each other. Once, after they had both retired, Cobb told Shoeless Joe, “I’ll tell you how well I remember you … Whenever I thought I was a good hitter, I’d stop and take a good look at you. Then I knew I could stand some improvement.” By all accounts, Jackson was visibly touched.

33. W.P. Kinsella described watching Field of Dreams get made as “colossal boredom.”

Amy Madigan and Kevin Costner star as Annie and Ray Kinsella in 'Field of Dreams' (1989)
Amy Madigan and Kevin Costner in Field of Dreams (1989).
Universal Pictures

"Colossal boredom" was how Kinsella described Iowa in the summer of 1988. The author said his daughter had more fun, because she was involved in "a little romance" with Liotta.

34. W.P. Kinsella gave Field of Dreams four out of five stars.

It lost a potentially perfect rating because Kinsella didn't think Timothy Busfield's Mark was villainous enough, nor that Gaby Hoffmann looked like Ray and Annie's child.

35. A few months before he retired, Vin Scully read Terrence Mann’s iconic speech from Field of Dreams.

Scully started calling Brooklyn Dodgers games in 1950. For the next 67 years, the broadcaster stayed with the club, covering its relocation to Los Angeles, all six of the franchise’s World Series championships to date, and almost 10,000 games overall. On May 26, 2016—during his last season in the announcer’s booth—Scully tugged at fans’ heartstrings by reciting the classic “People will come” monologue from Field of Dreams in a viral MLB video.

36. In order to make the final scene in Field of Dreams work, the citizens of Dyersville, Iowa agreed to a town-wide blackout.

In order to film the movie's final scene, 3000 Iowa residents in 1500 cars agreed to take part. There was a forced blackout in the town of Dyersville, Iowa, which included other baseball games and the local train. The director's instructions were broadcast on a local radio station. One was for the drivers to flash their high beams off and on as they drove to make it look as if there was more movement than there actually was.

37. Dwier Brown, who played Kevin Costner’s father in Field of Dreams, worried he would drop the ball during their seminal game of catch.

The scene in which Ray plays catch with his father had to be shot during magic hour, 15 minutes after sunset, which gave little room for error for actor Dwier Brown, who was working with a rock-hard, vintage catcher's mitt. He is proud of the fact that he never dropped it.

38. Dwier Brown shot Field of Dreams right after his own father's funeral.

He got back in time to play catch with Costner. It helped him access the necessary emotions.

39. To celebrate Field of Dreams’s 25th anniversary, Kevin Costner and his sons played catch at the now-iconic field.

Costner tossed a ball around with his sons Hayes and Cayden on June 13, 2014. (At the times, the boys were ages 5 and 7, respectively.) This was part of a three-day festival which included an on-site screening of the film, a Q&A panel hosted by Bob Costas, and a concert featuring Costner’s own band, Modern West.

40. The owner of the farm featured in Field of Dreams proposed to his wife on the baseball field.

The 'Field of Dreams' baseball field
Universal Pictures

Don Lansing met his wife Becky on New Year's Eve 1995 when she made a pilgrimage to visit the baseball field from Field of Dreams. When he proposed marriage, he did so on first base.

41. The field still attracts approximately 100,000 visitors per year.

When Don and Becky Lansing put the property up for sale in 2010, it was purchased by Go the Distance Baseball, an organization that made the property even more accessible to visitors and fans of the movie with a regular roster of special events. Today, 30 years after the movie's original release, an estimated 100,000 people make the trek to visit the baseball field each year.

42. You can rent the Field of Dreams farmhouse—and baseball field.

James Earl Jones and Kevin Costner in 'Field of Dreams' (1989)
James Earl Jones and Kevin Costner in Field of Dreams (1989).
Universal Pictures

In 2018, Go the Distance Baseball partnered with Booking.com to make spending the night in the farmhouse featured in Field of Dreams a reality. Guests can book stays of one night or longer. And while they'll have to share the field with the tourists during the hours it's open to the public, you're welcome to have your own private picnic in centerfield once the crowds clear out.

43. The White Sox and Yankees will play one regular-season game near the “Field of Dreams” site in 2020.

Scheduled for August 13, 2020, this’ll be the first Major League Baseball game ever played in Iowa. For the big event, a temporary 8,000-seat stadium will go up next to the park where Field of Dreams was shot. The White Sox have been designated as the “home” team.

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