Strange Paths to Multiple Medals

Getty Images
Getty Images

You might have seen gymnast Oksana Chusovitina pick up a silver medal for Germany in the women's vault final this weekend, an astounding feat for a 33-year-old mother in a sport dominated by girls half her age. Her age alone would make the story noteworthy, but the tale of Chusovitina joining Germany's team after leaving her native Uzbekistan to seek medical care for her young son is truly inspirational. Coupled with her gold team medal for the Unified Team at the 1992 Games, it also meant that she won an Olympic medal for a second country in her Olympic career, a rare occurrence. (American runner Bernard Lagat, who won medals for Kenya in 2000 and 2004 can do the same in the 5,000 meters later this week.)

Oksana Chusovitina is certainly not the only Olympian to travel an unlikely path to multiple medals. Here are some other notable athletes who either earned medals for multiple countries, won in both the Summer and Winter Games, or excelled in sport and art. (Yes, there used to be medals for stuff like city planning.)

Medals at Both the Summer and Winter Games

Picking up medals at both the Summer and Winter Games is obviously tough, since there's not much overlap between the two sets of events. Since the introduction of the Winter Games in 1924, four people have managed to medal at both sets of Games. (Five if you count Gillis Grafstrom, who won a figure skating medal at the final Summer Games to host the event in 1920 and then medaled in figure skating at the first three Winter Games.)

Clara Hughes
Hughes, a Canadian, picked up cycling bronze medals in both the road race and the time trial at the 1996 Games in Atlanta. By 2002 she had returned to speed skating, her original sport, and wrangled a bronze in the 5000 meters at the Winter Games in Salt Lake City. As if that wasn't impressive enough, Hughes added a gold in the 5000 meters and silver in the team pursuit at the 2006 Winter Games in Turin. She's the only athlete in history to win multiple medals at both the Winter and Summer Games.

Christa Luding
There was a precedent for Hughes' cycling-speed skating double play, though. East German skater Luding was an absolute terror on the ice during a career that saw her rack up gold medals at both the 1984 Games in Sarajevo and the 1988 Games in Calgary. She also picked up a silver medal in Calgary. In 1988, Luding hopped on her bike and won a silver medal in the track cycling sprint at the Summer Games in Seoul to become the only person to ever win summer and winter medals in the same year. Not content with these achievements, Luding then returned to the ice to win a speed skating bronze medal at the 1992 Games in Albertville.

Jacob Tullin Thams
Norwegian Thams grabbed the gold in the individual large hill ski jump at the 1924 Games in Chamonix as part of an illustrious ski jumping career that also included a gold in the same event at the 1926 World Championships. He eventually turned his attentions to sailing, though, and at the 1936 Games in Berlin won silver as part of Norway's eight-meter yachting team.

Eddie Eagan
Although Eagan was born to a poor family in Denver, he managed to use his smarts to make it through college at Yale, law school at Harvard, and later study at Oxford. If anyone called Eagan a nerd, though, he could have made them regret it; he also won a boxing gold as a light heavyweight at the 1920 Games in Antwerp. Eagan became a successful lawyer, but his athletic itch persisted. He took up bobsleigh racing and won a gold as part of the American four-man team at the 1932 Games at Lake Placid. He's still the only person to win a gold medal in both the Summer and Winter Games.

Medal Winners in Sports and Arts

From 1912 to 1948, the Olympics weren't solely the home of athletic struggles; competitors also vied for the medals in various artistic disciplines. Artists could earn medals for their sports-inspired works of architecture, literature, music, painting, and sculpture. The art competition eventually met its doom when organizers realized the artists were professionals and thus not part of the amateur spirit of the Games, but two men managed to snag medals for both sports and arts before an art exhibit replaced the competitive scoring.

"¢ Russian-born, England-based American Walter Winans picked up a pair of medals at the 1908 and 1912 Games as a marksman in the running deer event. He was also serious about sculpture and took home a gold medal in 1912 for his bronze statuette of a horse entitled "An American Trotter."

"¢ Hungarian swimmer Alfred Hajos also pulled off this double. He won two swimming golds at the first modern Games in 1896, and dropped one of the better quips in Olympic history: when the crown prince of Greece asked Hajos where he learned to swim so well, the medalist pithily responded, "In the water." After the Games, Hajos returned to Hungary where he was a dominant track and field athlete and a forward on the national soccer team. He also learned about architecture, the discipline in which he and fellow Hungarian Dezso Lauber won a silver medal in town planning at the 1924 Games in Paris.

Medals for Multiple Countries

Not many other athletes besides Oksana Chusovitina have won medals for multiple countries while their original nation continued fielding teams. One particularly impressive example is Chen Jing, who dominated women's table tennis at the 1988 Games for China, winning both the individual gold and the silver in doubles. She then switched her team allegiances to Chinese Taipei and won a silver in Atlanta and a bronze in Sydney for her new squad.

We'll be watching later this week to see if former Kenyan medalist Bernard Lagat can join the club as he runs the 5,000 meters for the United States.

Ethan Trex grew up idolizing Vince Coleman, and he kind of still does. Ethan co-writes Straight Cash, Homey, the Internet's undisputed top source for pictures of people in Ryan Leaf jerseys.

Tom Brady Makes Nearly $1.5 Million Per Hour of Playtime—Which Is Only a Fraction of the NFL’s Highest Paid Quarterbacks’ Earnings

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady during the AFC Wild Card Playoff game in January 2020.
New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady during the AFC Wild Card Playoff game in January 2020.
Elsa/Getty Images

Each week during football season, NFL quarterbacks face heaps of high-stakes pressure as millions tune in to watch them try to lead their teams to victory—or at least avoid getting blamed for bad passes. It’s by no means an easy job, but at least it pays well.

To find out just how well, AT&T affiliate All Home Connections analyzed the salaries and playing times of all the first-string quarterbacks from the 2018 NFL season. Even if you knew they were raking in piles of cash for every second they spent on the field, you might not have realized just how much.

If you’re looking for ways to justify despising Tom Brady, here’s one: He earns about $1.5 million for every hour of playtime. However, as any devoted New England Patriots fan will tell you, Brady is far from the highest-earning quarterback in the league, and he’s accepted lower base salaries throughout his career so the Patriots can use that extra money to build a championship-winning team around him.

When it comes to playtime earnings, San Francisco 49ers quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo beat Tom Brady and every other quarterback by millions—he landed in first place with an average of more than $27.6 million per hour on the field. Compared to Garoppolo, the $8.8 million of runner-up Aaron Rodgers practically seems like pocket change. Most of the other quarterbacks earn somewhere between $1 million and $4 million per hour of playtime.

Part of the reason it looks like Garoppolo out-earned his peers so spectacularly is because his total playtime for the 2018 season was much lower than everyone else’s, due to a knee injury he suffered during the third game of the season. For this study, All Home Connections added up each quarterback’s total number of snaps and multiplied it by their offense’s average seconds per play to estimate their overall playing time. Then, they divided that number by the quarterback’s 2018 salary. Since Garoppolo’s overall playing time was only about 1.5 hours, he got more buck for his bang. Brady, by comparison, clocked about 10 hours of playtime during 2018.

See the full breakdown here, and get ready for Super Bowl LIV with these fascinating Super Bowl facts.

[h/t All Home Connections]

Heinz Might Pay Your Flight Change Fee if Your Favorite NFL Team Didn’t Make the Super Bowl

Vitor de Souza/iStock via Getty Images
Vitor de Souza/iStock via Getty Images

After an especially thrilling playoff season, Super Bowl LIV is officially set: It’s a showdown between the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers, happening on Sunday, February 2, at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida.

For any Chiefs or 49ers fan who booked a plane ticket to Florida before the teams had secured their spots, give yourself a pat on the back. For fans of a different team who booked tickets in advance, only to watch your team lose spectacularly during a playoff game, Heinz is here to help.

According to Yahoo Finance, the food company will cover the flight change fee for 300 lucky people who’d like to reroute their Miami-bound flights over Super Bowl weekend. In order to qualify, your flight had to have been booked before midnight on January 15, 2020; it must be on a domestic airline; and the destination had to have been Miami International Airport between January 29 and February 2, 2020.

If you can check all those boxes, snap a photo of your ticket confirmation and head to Heinz57FlightChange.com to enter the contest. All you need to do is fill in your name and email address, upload your image, and press “Submit.” It’s open until February 7, and winners will be notified by email on or around February 10.

If you win, Heinz will issue you a prepaid Visa gift card for the amount of $199.43 to reimburse you for the cost of your flight change. That will almost cover a fee of $200, except for 57 cents—a call-out to Heinz’s “57 Varieties” slogan.

Enter here, and gear up for the game wherever you are with 53 Super Bowl facts here.

[h/t Yahoo Finance]

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