8 Successful People Grateful They Got Canned

MARK J. TERRILL/AFP/Getty Images
MARK J. TERRILL/AFP/Getty Images

In our tough economic climate, it's worth reminding ourselves that losing a job might not be the end of the world. Sure, it never feels good, but for these well-known folks, getting the boot from their gigs provided the impetus for them to reach even greater successes.

1. Jerry Seinfeld

Remember the ABC sitcom Benson? Seinfeld undoubtedly does. Early in his career he had a small recurring role as a mail boy on three episodes of the show from 1980-81. One day he showed up at work for a read-through, but he couldn't find a script with his name on it. After Seinfeld asked what was going on, an assistant director told him he'd been fired from the show, but nobody had remembered to tell the young comedian. A humiliated Seinfeld trudged out and decided he was through with sitcoms unless he could get more control over the creative process. As you might have heard, he was pretty successful once that eventually happened.

2. Michael Bloomberg

By most any metric, the Mayor of New York is a pretty successful fellow. His $20 billion net worth makes him one of the ten richest people in America, and he can still run for another mayoral term. He wasn't always so successful, though. In 1981, investment firm Salomon Brothers canned him from his partner-level job following a buyout (although Bloomberg got $10 million as a payment for his capital in the firm). Instead of jumping back into another job at an investment bank, Bloomberg took the cash and bet it on an oddball idea he had to use computers to disseminate financial information to investment firms. Good move. The company, Innovative Market Systems, was eventually renamed Bloomberg L.P., and that company is worth somewhere north of $20 billion today.

3. Robert Redford

Before he became the Sundance Kid, Redford needed his dad's help to get a job at Standard Oil. Although he would later reach great heights on the screen, acting like a good employee was one role he never nailed. As Harvey Mackay writes in his 2004 book Fired Up!, Redford served as a "roustabout," an unskilled laborer who did little jobs around the rigs, until he was discovered sleeping in an oil tank he'd been assigned to clean. Instead of canning him on the spot, the company put Redford on probation and moved him to a bottle-washing plant where he drove a forklift. Redford got bored with the job, though, and started doing forklift tricks. One day it literally all came crashing down when Redford took a corner too quickly and overturned his bottle-laden forklift. As Redford dryly remarked to Mackay, "I knew it was the end of my career in that business."

4. Wilco

In 2000 and 2001, the Chicago rock band Wilco recorded an artsy album that departed from the band's previous folk-inflected work. The record, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, didn't sound quite like what the band's label, Reprise Records, was hoping for. Although the album isn't aggressively grating, it wasn't full of the radio-friendly rock that the cash-strapped imprint needed to churn out a few hit singles. Reprise refused to release the album and dropped Wilco from its roster. As part of their severance from the label, the band got to take the master tapes of the record with them.

Without a label to release the album, Wilco decided to simply stream it on their website for free. As critical buzz for the record built, Nonesuch Records (like Reprise, a subsidiary of Warner Brothers) bought Yankee Hotel Foxtrot and gave it a commercial release in 2002. The record was a critical smash; it topped many critics' best-albums lists for the year. It was also a commercial success, selling close to 600,000 copies.

5. Annabelle Gurwitch

Annabelle Gurwitch, who hosted Dinner and a Movie on TBS from 1996 to 2002, had at least one show business firing that would have made most people look for a new career. In 2003 she was acting in a play under the direction of her idol Woody Allen when the director suddenly decided he didn't like what he was seeing from Gurwitch. He really, seriously didn't like it. As Allen fired Gurwitch, he launched into a tirade, saying, "What you're doing is terrible, none of it good, all of it bad, don't ever do that again." As if he hadn't said enough, Allen then added, "You look retarded."

Taking that sort of abuse from a hero would be too much for some people to take, but Gurwitch used it as a springboard to a new comedic niche. She started a website that collected other people's stories of being fired, and she later parlayed that into a book, Fired!: Tales of the Canned, Canceled, Downsized, and Dismissed that shared some of her show-biz friends' stories of terrible firings. The book, in which celebs like Bob Saget, Jeff Garlin, and Tim Allen all told their own tales of sudden unemployment, later became the basis for a 2007 documentary of the same name.

6. Rainn Wilson

The actor who plays Dwight Schrute isn't quite as eager-to-please as his on-screen alter ego. In a 2007 interview with New York Magazine, Wilson told the story of working as an events coordinator at a foundation for disabled people. When his boss said, "Jump!" he wanted his subordinates to literally ask, "How high?" Wilson wasn't up for that, and he got fired.

7. Howard Stern

It might be hard to believe, but Howard Stern has been fired for being offensive. While working for NBC's flagship AM station WNBC in New York in 1985, Stern did a bit on his show called (and this is not a joke), "Beastiality Dial-a-Date." Negative public reaction to the skit prompted Stern's firing. Instead of cleaning up his material and trying to start fresh, Stern quickly found a new home on FM radio and remained edgy. It worked. Following a jump to Sirius in 2006, Stern now pulls in as much as $70 million a year for his show.

8. Bill Bellichick

Belichick, the glowering, hoodie-wearing architect of multiple Super Bowl wins with the New England Patriots, had a rough start to his head-coaching career. In 1991 he took over the star-crossed Cleveland Browns, and like so many Browns coaches before him, he just couldn't win. Belichick guided the team to records of 6-10, 7-9, and 7-9 in his first three seasons before riding Vinny Testaverde and the immortal Leroy Hoard to an 11-5 record in 1994. The team even won a playoff game that year. The success didn't last for Belichick, though, as the team crashed back down during a 5-11 debacle of a season in 1995.

After five years in Cleveland, Belichick had a 36-44 record. Owner Art Modell decided he'd seen enough and kicked his coach to the curb, then moved the franchise to Baltimore. Belichick latched on with Bill Parcells again and became the Big Tuna's assistant head coach in New England and then for the New York Jets. He was better prepared for his next shot at a head coaching gig, which came with the Patriots in 2000. 

Kodak’s New Cameras Don't Just Take Photos—They Also Print Them

Your Instagram account wishes it had this clout.
Your Instagram account wishes it had this clout.
Kodak

Snapping a photo and immediately sharing it on social media is definitely convenient, but there’s still something so satisfying about having the printed photo—like you’re actually holding the memory in your hands. Kodak’s new STEP cameras now offer the best of both worlds.

As its name implies, the Kodak STEP Instant Print Digital Camera, available for $70 on Amazon, lets you take a picture and print it out on that very same device. Not only do you get to skip the irksome process of uploading photos to your computer and printing them on your bulky, non-portable printer (or worse yet, having to wait for your local pharmacy to print them for you), but you never need to bother with ink cartridges or toner, either. The Kodak STEP comes with special 2-inch-by-3-inch printing paper inlaid with color crystals that bring your image to life. There’s also an adhesive layer on the back, so you can easily stick your photos to laptop covers, scrapbooks, or whatever else could use a little adornment.

There's a 10-second self-timer, so you don't have to ask strangers to take your group photos.Kodak

For those of you who want to give your photos some added flair, you might like the Kodak STEP Touch, available for $130 from Amazon. It’s similar to the regular Kodak STEP, but the LCD touch screen allows you to edit your photos before you print them; you can also shoot short videos and even share your content straight to social media.

If you want to print photos from your smartphone gallery, there's the Kodak STEP Instant Mobile Photo Printer. This portable $80 printer connects to any iOS or Android device with Bluetooth capabilities and can print whatever photos you send to it.

The Kodak STEP Instant Mobile Photo Printer connects to an app that allows you to add filters and other effects to your photos. Kodak

All three Kodak STEP devices come with some of that magical printer paper, but you can order additional refills, too—a 20-sheet set costs $8 on Amazon.

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10 Fast Facts About Wilma Rudolph

Wilma Rudolph breaks the tape as she wins the Olympic 4 x 100 relay in 1960.
Wilma Rudolph breaks the tape as she wins the Olympic 4 x 100 relay in 1960.
Robert Riger/Getty Images

Wilma Rudolph made history as a Black female athlete at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, Italy. The 20-year-old Tennessee State University sprinter was the first American woman to win three gold medals at one Olympics. Rudolph’s heroics in the 100-meter, 200-meter, and 4 x 100-meter events only lasted seconds, but her legend persists decades later, despite her untimely 1994 death from cancer at age 54. Here are some facts about this U.S. Olympic Hall of Fame member.

1. Wilma Rudolph faced poverty and polio as a child.

When Rudolph was born prematurely on June 23, 1940, in Clarksville, Tennessee, she weighed just 4.5 pounds. Olympic dreams seemed impossible for Rudolph, whose impoverished family included 21 other siblings. Among other maladies, she had measles, mumps, and pneumonia by age 4. Most devastatingly, polio twisted her left leg, and she wore leg braces until she was 9.

2. Wilma Rudolph originally wanted to play basketball.

The Tennessee Tigerbelles. From left to right: Martha Hudson, Lucinda Williams, Wilma Rudolph, and Barbara Jones.Central Press/Getty Images

At Clarksville’s Burt High School, Rudolph flourished on the basketball court. Nearly 6 feet tall, she studied the game, and ran track to keep in shape. However, while competing in the state basketball championship in Nashville, the 14-year-old speedster met a referee named Ed Temple, who doubled as the acclaimed coach of the Tennessee State Tigerbelles track team. Temple, who would coach at the 1960 and 1964 Olympics, recruited Rudolph.

3. Wilma Rudolph made her Olympic debut as a teenager.

Rudolph hit the limelight at 16, earning a bronze medal in the 4 x 100-meter relay at the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, Australia. But that didn’t compare to the media hype when she won three gold medals in 1960. French journalists called her “The Black Pearl,” the Italian press hailed “The Black Gazelle,” and in America, Rudolph was “The Tornado.”

4. After her gold medals, Wilma Rudolph insisted on a racially integrated homecoming.

Tennessee governor Buford Ellington, who supported racial segregation, intended to oversee the Clarksville celebrations when Rudolph returned from Rome. However, she refused to attend her parade or victory banquet unless both were open to Black and white people. Rudolph got her wish, resulting in the first integrated events in the city’s history.

5. Muhammad Ali had a crush on Wilma Rudolph.

Ali—known as Cassius Clay when he won the 1960 Olympic light heavyweight boxing title—befriended Rudolph in Rome. That fall, the 18-year-old boxer invited Rudolph to his native Louisville, Kentucky. He drove her around in a pink Cadillac convertible.

6. John F. Kennedy literally fell over when he invited Wilma Rudolph to the White House.

President Kennedy, Wilma Rudolph, Rudolph’s mother Blanche Rudolph, and Vice President Johnson in the Oval Office.Abbie Rowe/White House Photographs/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum // Public Domain

In 1961, Rudolph met JFK in the Oval Office. After getting some photos taken together, the President attempted to sit down in his rocking chair and tumbled to the floor. Kennedy quipped: “It’s not every day that I get to meet an Olympic champion.” They chatted for about 30 minutes.

7. Wilma Rudolph held three world records when she retired.

Rudolph chose to go out on top and retired in 1962 at just 22 years old. Her 100-meter (11.2 seconds), 200-meter (22.9 seconds), and 4 x 100-meter relay (44.3 seconds) world records all lasted several years.

8. Wilma Rudolph visited West African countries as a goodwill ambassador.

The U.S. State Department sent Rudolph to the 1963 Friendship Games in Dakar, Senegal. According to Penn State professor Amira Rose Davis, while there, Rudolph independently met with future Ghanaian president Kwame Nkrumah’s Young Pioneers, a nationalist youth movement. She visited Mali, Guinea, and the Republic of Upper Volta (now Burkina Faso) as well.

9. Denzel Washington made his TV debut in a movie about Wilma Rudolph.

Before his Oscar-winning performances in Glory (1989) and Training Day (2001), a 22-year-old Denzel Washington portrayed Robert Eldridge, Rudolph’s second husband, in Wilma (1977). The film also starred Cicely Tyson as Rudolph’s mother Blanche.

10. Schools, stamps, and statues commemorate Wilma Rudolph’s legacy.

Berlin, Germany, has a high school named after Rudolph. The U.S. Postal Service issued a stamp celebrating her in 2004. Clarksville features a bronze statue by the Cumberland River, the 1000-capacity Wilma Rudolph Event Center, and Wilma Rudolph Boulevard. In Tennessee, June 23 is Wilma Rudolph Day.