6 Legendary Guitars/RIP Les Paul

Getty Images
Getty Images

[It is with sadness that we report Les Paul's death today, at the age of 94. I had the pleasure of meeting Les a couple times when I was playing guitar with Pat Martino. Pat and Les were good friends, and the three of us had drinks once when Les had his standing gig at a small, now defunct jazz club across the street from Lincoln Center. That night, I asked Les if he really loved the guitar named after him, and he said dryly, "It pays the rent."In honor of Les, I thought we'd rerun this post, which, curiously, went up earlier this week. Goodbye Les, we'll all miss your music making...]

Each guitar on this list helped define either a genre, a sound, or in some cases, a career. Think of it as an introduction to some of the most popular guitars in the world. For the companion post on 5 Legendary Keyboards, click here.

1. Gibson Les Paul

Design: In the early "˜50s, Gibson president Ted McCarty approached jazz phenomenon Les Paul and asked if the guitarist would lend his name to a new guitar, then in design stages. Paul agreed, and also lent some minor advice along the lines of color schemes. In 1952, one of the world's most famous guitars of all-time was unveiled. Except for a period of time in the mid "˜60s, it's been in production ever since.

[caption id="attachment_31639" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Les Paul with his LesPaul"][/caption]

Look/Feel/Sound: The signature sound of the Les Paul is warm and full, with lots of sustain. In fact, the instrument's sustain is so well known, it was used as a joke in This Is Spinal Tap. Nigel Tufnel is showing mockumentarian Marty DiBergi his guitar collection and holds up a Les Paul Standard, showing off the sustain without actually playing a note. While there are many different models and styles, with slightly different pickup configurations and cut-aways, all Les Paul's, like all Gibson's in general, feature top-mounted strings, rather than through the guitar body, as seen in competitor Fender's designs.

Guitarists who helped make it a legend: Les Paul, of course, but just about every important guitarist over the last half century has recorded with one. The most famous devotee is probably Jimmy Page, who, when he wasn't playing his trusty double neck, was generally armed with one. Coupled with his Marshall stack amplifiers and sometimes a cello bow, Page was able to pull even more sustain out of the instrument.

Hear it in action:

2. Gibson Flying V

Design: Orville Gibson, a mandolin maker from Kalamazoo, MI, founded Gibson way back in the late 1800s. But the Gibson Flying V didn't hit the market until three quarters of a century later, in 1958, and was a flying flop that Ted McCarty, Gibson's then-president, immediately discontinued.

[caption id="attachment_31154" align="alignleft" width="299" caption="Albert King"][/caption]

Look/Feel/Sound: In 1955, Gibson introduced its classic double-coil "humbucking" pickup, which was incorporated onto this odd, V-shaped guitar, clearly ahead of its time. Between the mahogany body and the double-coil pickup, the Flying V quickly became known for its powerful sound.

Guitarists who helped make it a legend: Bluesman Albert King got a hold of the Flying V in '58 and never let go. But it wasn't until Dave Davies started using one in the "˜60s that Gibson decided to reissue the guitar in 1967. Other famous guitarists who helped popularize the instrument include Hendrix, Billy Gibbons, Rudolph and Michael Schenker, Kirk Hammett, and Eddie Van Halen.

3. Fender Telecaster

Design: Another Leo Fender creation, the Telecaster hit the market in 1949 and has been going strong ever since. It is considered the very first solid-body guitar to make a significant impact on the music scene. It was also the first solid-body guitar mass-produced on an assembly line.

[caption id="attachment_31159" align="alignleft" width="211" caption="Keith Richards"][/caption]

Look/Feel/Sound: Like the Fender Strat, the Telecaster (aka Tele), is known for it's bright, rich tone. It has two single-coil pickups, as opposed to the Strat's traditional three. One of the most famous solos ever recorded with the Tele is Jimmy Page's "Stairway to Heaven" solo.

Guitarists who helped make it a legend: The Father of Chicago Blues, Muddy Waters, was an early signature user, as were many other blues players such as Roy Buchanan and Albert Collins, who was sometimes called "The Master of the Telecaster." The Clash's Joe Strummer was rarely seen without one, and it was a favorite of Andy Summers, as well as Keith Richards.

Hear it in action:

4. Fender Stratocaster

Design: Fender first put out the "Strat," the brilliant work of Leo Fender, George Fullerton and Freddie Tavares, in 1954.

Look/Feel/Sound: The Strat features a double-cutaway, sleek, contoured body, often referred to by Fender as a "Comfort Contour Body." Those three single-coil pickups in the middle of the body further define not only the look of the Strat, but the famous sound, which is clean, crisp, and twangy.

[caption id="attachment_31145" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Buddy Holly"][/caption]

Guitarists who helped make it a legend: While it's hard to find a well-known guitarist who hasn't recorded or owned a Strat, there are definitely certain musicians who relied heavily on the guitar during their careers. Early on in the guitar's history, Buddy Holly helped turn the instrument into a familiar icon, using it almost exclusively in the late "˜50s, and most notably on his Ed Sullivan performance in 1958.

In the "˜60s, it was Jimi Hendrix who really helped push the guitar to legendary status. Because Hendrix was left-handed, yet generally used a right-handed Stratocaster flipped upside-down and strung left-handed, he got a bit of a different tone out of the instrument because the pickups were reversed. This gave a brighter punch to the lower strings, and warmer tone to the higher strings. Since his death, Fender has released many Hendrix "tribute" Strats, both left-handed versions, and right-handed versions, in attempt to try and recreate the Hendrix Stratocaster sound.

Hear it in action:

5. Gibson SG

Design: In 1961, Gibson added some horns to the cutaways of the Les Paul and slimmed down the body. The result was a really cool looking solid body (or SG) that Les Paul didn't like at all. So he made Gibson take his name off the instrument, and like that the SG was born. It's been in production in one form or another ever since.

[caption id="attachment_31166" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Angus Young"][/caption]

Look/Feel/Sound: Gibson advertised the SG as having the "fastest neck in the world", because the neck profile was slender. This, combined with the thinner body, means less sustain than the Les Paul, but the SG still packs quite a punch. It's like Gibson's answer to the Fender Strat, only with a slightly warmer tone.

Guitarists who helped make it a legend: Another long list here, including George Harrison, Tony Iommi, Elliot Easton, The Edge, Dave Grohl, and Frank Zappa. But perhaps the most famous is Angus Young, of AC/DC fame, who was rarely seen with anything but the SG. Gibson even produced an Angus Young Signature SG model.

6. Gibson Explorer

Design: For one brief year, between 1958 and 1959, Gibson put out one of the most unusual looking guitars to leave a major imprint on the scene, ever. Thing is, at first it was an exploratory flop, way ahead of its time. When other guitar manufacturers brought out Explorer knock-offs in the "˜70s, Gibson re-issued the once-futuristic looking guitar, and it became an instant favorite of heavy metal bands like Iron Maiden, and glam metal rockers like Mötley Crüe.

[caption id="attachment_31165" align="alignleft" width="248" caption="James Hetfield"][/caption]

Look/Feel/Sound: Obviously the look is unique. The same can't really be said about this guitar's sound, which is rather average. Although, in the early "˜80s, when metal bands were using them nearly to a fault, Gibson introduced an Explorer with high-output, "Dirty Fingers" humbucker pickups. This made an already "˜loud' design, a really loud instrument. So loud, you would expect a Spinal Tap joke about how the guitar went to 14, four louder than 10.

Guitarists who helped make it a legend: Again, we're talking loud bands here, so James Hetfield, Eddie Van Halen, and Dave Murray, for sure. But some others have helped bring the Explorer to center stage, including: The Edge, and bands like ZZ Top and Cheap Trick.

[If you're wondering why songs weren't used as examples in this post, mental_floss is no longer able to offer excerpts from copyrighted music. We apologize.]

Check out past On Music posts here >>

14 Retro Gifts for Millennials

Ravi Palwe, Unsplash
Ravi Palwe, Unsplash

Millennials were born between 1981 and 1996, which means the pop culture they grew up with is officially retro. No matter what generation you belong to, consider these gifts when shopping for the Millennials in your life this holiday season.

1. Reptar Funko Pop!; $29

Amazon

This vinyl Reptar figurine from Funko is as cool as anything you’d find in the rugrats’ toy box. The monster dinosaur has been redesigned in classic Pop! style, making it a perfect desk or shelf accessory for the grown-up Nickelodeon fan. It also glows in the dark, which should appeal to anyone’s inner child.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Dragon Ball Z Slippers; $20

Hot Topic

You don’t need to change out of your pajamas to feel like a Super Saiyan. These slippers are emblazoned with the same kanji Goku wears on his gi in Dragon Ball Z: one for training under King Kai and one for training with Master Roshi. And with a soft sherpa lining, the footwear feels as good as it looks.

Buy it: Hot Topic

3. The Pokémon Cookbook; $15

Hop Topic

What do you eat after a long day of training and catching Pokémon? Any dish in The Pokémon Cookbook is a great option. This book features more than 35 recipes inspired by creatures from the Pokémon franchise, including Poké Ball sushi rolls and mashed Meowth potatoes.

Buy it: Hot Topic

4. Lisa Frank Activity Book; $5

Urban Outfitters

Millennials will never be too old for Lisa Frank, especially when the artist’s playful designs come in a relaxing activity book. Watercolor brings the rainbow characters in this collection to life. Just gather some painting supplies and put on a podcast for a relaxing, nostalgia-fueled afternoon.

Buy it: Urban Outfitters

5. Shoebox Tape Recorder with USB; $28

Amazon

The days of recording mix tapes don’t have to be over. This device looks and functions just like tape recorders from the pre-smartphone era. And with a USB port as well as a line-in jack and built-in mic, users can easily import their digital music collection onto retro cassette tapes.

Buy it: Amazon

6. Days of the Week Scrunchie Set; $12

Urban Outfitters

Millennials can be upset that a trend from their youth is old enough to be cool again, or they can embrace it. This scrunchie set is for anyone happy to see the return of the hair accessory. The soft knit ponytail holders come in a set of five—one for each day of the school (or work) week.

Buy it: Urban Outfitters

7. D&D Graphic T-shirt; $38-$48

80s Tees

The perfect gift for the Dungeon Master in your life, this graphic tee is modeled after the cover of the classic Dungeons & Dragons rule book. It’s available in sizes small through 3XL.

Buy it: 80s Tees

8. Chuck E. Cheese T-shirt; $36-$58

80s Tees

Few Millennials survived childhood without experiencing at least one birthday party at Chuck E. Cheese. This retro T-shirt sports the brand’s original name: Chuck E. Cheese’s Pizza Time Theatre. It may be the next-best gift for a Chuck E. Cheese fan behind a decommissioned animatronic.

Buy it: 80s Tees

9. The Nightmare Before Christmas Picnic Blanket Bag; $40

Shop Disney

Fans of Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas will recognize the iconic scene on the front of this messenger bag. Unfold it and the bag becomes a blanket fit for a moonlit picnic among the pumpkins. The bottom side is waterproof and the top layer is made of soft fleece.

Buy it: Shop Disney

10. Toy Story Alien Socks; $15

Shop Disney

You don’t need to be skilled at the claw machine to take home a pair of these socks. Decorated with the aliens from Toy Story, they’re made from soft-knit fabric and are big enough to fit adult feet.

Buy it: Shop Disney

11. Goosebumps Board Game; $24

Amazon

Fans that read every book in R.L. Stine’s series growing up can now play the Goosebumps board game. In this game, based on the Goosebumps movie, players take on the role of their favorite monster from the series and race to the typewriter at the end of the trail of manuscripts.

Buy it: Amazon

12. Tamagotchi Mini; $19

Amazon

If you know someone who killed their Tamagotchi in the '90s, give them another chance to show off their digital pet-care skills. This Tamagotchi is a smaller, simplified version of the original game. It doubles as a keychain, so owners have no excuse to forget to feed their pet.

Buy it: Amazon

13. SNES Classic; $275

Amazon

The SNES Classic is much easier to find now than when it first came out, and it's still just as entertaining for retro video game fans. This mini console comes preloaded with 21 Nintendo games, including Super Mario Kart and Street Fighter II.

Buy it: Amazon

14. Planters Cheez Balls; $24

Amazon

Planters revived its Cheez Balls in 2018 after pulling them from shelves nearly a decade earlier. To Millennials unaware of that fact, this gift could be their dream come true. The throwback snack even comes in the classic canister fans remember.

Buy it: Amazon

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20 Fun Facts About "Weird Al" Yankovic

Kyle Cassidy, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0
Kyle Cassidy, Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 4.0

Starting with his first professional recordings and appearances on the Dr. Demento radio show decades ago, "Weird Al" Yankovic—who was born in Downey, California, on October 23, 1959—has managed to stay on the pop culture map and change with the times, even as so many of the bands and artists he has parodied have faded out of the spotlight. Here are some facts about "Weird Al" Yankovic and his songs.

1. “Weird Al” Yankovic's parents chose the accordion for him.

The legend—verified by Al Yankovic in the liner notes of his 1994 box set Permanent Record: Al in the Box—reads that on the day before Al turned 7, a door-to-door salesman came through Lynwood, California, to solicit business for a local music school, which offered its pupils a choice between guitar or accordion lessons. Because Frankie Yankovic shared the family's surname and was known as "America's Polka King," Al's parents chose the squeezebox for their son. Al would gradually learn how to play rock n' roll on the instrument, mostly from Elton John's Goodbye Yellow Brick Road album, playing it "over and over" and trying to play along with it. Frankie and Al weren't actually related, but the two would eventually collaborate, with Al playing on "Who Stole the Kishka?" on Frankie's Songs of the Polka King, Vol. 1, and Frankie's "The Tick Tock Polka" played by Al as a lead-in to Ke$ha's "Tik Tok" on the Alpocalypse track "Polka Face."

2. Weird Al skipped the second grade.

Al attended kindergarten one year early and skipped the second grade, and his scholastic promotion was not popular with his older classmates. "I got my fair share of verbal abuse, but I learned to run pretty fast so I didn't get beat up a lot," Yankovic said. He said that when he wasn't running away, his recess time was often spent pretending to be Mr. Terrific, a TV character that took a power pill to make him a superhero. Yankovic would graduate Lynwood High School at the age of 16 as valedictorian.

3. Al Yankovic added the "Weird" to his name in college.

Yankovic was referred to by his full first name "Alfred" throughout childhood. It wasn't until he attended California Polytechnic State University looking for a degree in architecture that "Weird" became attached to Al Yankovic permanently. Al got a gig with the campus radio station playing records on Wednesdays from midnight to 3 a.m. and needed a DJ name, christening himself "Weird Al." It would take Yankovic time to sneak in any "weird" music that was not considered a part of the college station's format (New Wave music), but the moniker was his tribute to the comedy and novelty song playing radio broadcaster Dr. Demento (Barry Hansen), who gave Yankovic's earliest compositions some airplay.

4. "Weird Al" Yankovic's "My Bologna" was recorded in a bathroom.

In 1979, while he was still in college, Yankovic recorded his parody of The Knack's "My Sharona" in the acoustic-tiled bathroom across the hall from the college radio station, finding a microphone cord long enough to reach back to KCPR-FM's tape deck to make it possible. The song got a huge positive response on Dr. Demento's show, but "My Bologna" was the song that turned Yankovic's hobby into a career thanks to a backstage meeting with The Knack after a campus concert. Fortuitously, Rupert Perry, the VP of Capitol Records, was also present when Knack lead singer Doug Feiger professed to liking Al's parody. Yankovic remembered Feiger turning to Perry and saying, "'You guys oughta put this song out on Capitol Records." Perry agreed, and Al soon signed a six-month contract.

5. "weird Al" Yankovic doesn't legally have to seek out permission to parody an artist's song, but he asks for it anyway.

Under the "fair use" provision of U.S. copyright law, Yankovic and others do not need permission from original artists to satirize their work, as long as royalties are paid. But to stay on friendly terms with other artists in the industry, Weird Al asks for permission before recording anyway.

When he was still wet behind the ears, Al also discovered that if you don't seek out original artist approval, you can have a tough time getting a label to release your latest single. In 1981, Weird Al released "Another One Rides The Bus," a parody of Queen's "Another One Bites the Dust," without asking the band, and before TK Records agreed to a deal. It would turn out to be TK Records' last single release, as the company abruptly closed down citing financial trouble. Yankovic decided to go ahead and make his first national TV appearance on April 21, 1981 on Tomorrow with Tom Snyder, and Queen eventually gave the song their blessing (though guitarist Brian May referred to him as "Mad Al").

6. Some musicians and record labels have denied “Weird Al” Yankovic permission to parody their songs.

Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Hilarity For Charity

Yankovic has said that only "about 2 to 3 percent" of the time does he get a "no" from an artist or record label, but there have been notable rejections. Even though Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page is a fan, he indicated he would not approve of a polka medley of Zeppelin tunes. Still, a sample of "Black Dog" was allowed in a "Trapped in the Closet" parody. Paul McCartney didn't give permission for Wings' "Live and Let Die" because the altered version would have been "Chicken Pot Pie," which would have gone against McCartney's vegetarianism.

In some cases, the artist agrees but is overruled by the label. James Blunt initially said that it would be a "huge compliment" to have "You're Beautiful" changed to "You're Pitiful," but Atlantic Records rescinded authorization (Yankovic released his version as a free MySpace download to avoid starting trouble with Atlantic).

In an example of a no being turned into a yes, Daniel Powter initially refused to have his "Bad Day" parodied as "You Had a Bad Date," but changed his mind. Powter had the change of heart "literally the day before" Weird Al recorded "White & Nerdy" (the music video of which has Al vandalizing Atlantic Records' Wikipedia entry), and by then "the train had left the station."

7. One group's fans threw things at Weird Al and his band for 45 minutes

In 1982, Weird Al and his newly formed band played at their first major gig—and it was a profound disaster. The band opened for the then-popular New Wave band Missing Persons at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, where they were on the receiving end of assorted thrown objects for their entire 45 minute set. Yankovic remembered his band scrambling for the loose change as soon as the curtain went down.

The ignominy didn't end indoors: "I was walking to my car in the parking lot, and this 12 year old boy comes up to me and says 'Are you Weird Al?' I said yes, and he said 'YOU SUCK!' That was the capper of the evening." After that, the band agreed to never play as anyone's opening act and to just be the headliner of smaller shows—a rule they wouldn't break for five years until agreeing to open for The Monkees in 1987. Their fans were far more civil.

8. "I Lost On Jeopardy" might have played a part in getting Jeopardy! back on the air.

This is the general timeline of events: Jeopardy! started as a daytime game show on NBC from 1964-1975, hosted by Art Fleming, with Don Pardo (later of SNL fame) as the announcer. On December 12, 1983, Weird Al recorded "I Lost On Jeopardy." The single, which referred to the NBC version of the show, was released on June 4, 1984; the music video, starring Fleming and Pardo, had been filmed two weeks earlier. Sometime in between the recording of the song and the shooting of the video, Griffin was asked to pair his already-popular Wheel of Fortune with another half-hour game show, and at some point he re-discovered Jeopardy!. Griffin invited Yankovic to perform his song on June 29, 1984 and talked with him briefly afterwards, saying that with the great success of the single, Jeopardy! was coming back on the air. Whether Griffin was being tongue-in-cheek, or just exaggerating, or hedging his bets if the revival failed, Jeopardy! returned on September 10, 1984 with new host Alex Trebek. Despite some programmers initially putting the show on during unpopular morning and late night hours, the revival would become an television institution, and generate many losers.

9. "Like A Surgeon" was Madonna's idea.

Reportedly, Madonna and an unnamed friend made history while talking one day. Madonna wondered aloud when Weird Al would turn "Like a Virgin" into "Like a Surgeon." The friend was a mutual friend of Yankovic's manager Jay Levey. Levey then told Yankovic, and soon it became the first single and video from the Dare To Be Stupid album. It was the first and last time a musician successfully offered a suggestion to Yankovic, who openly discourages people from giving him parody ideas.

10. Michael Jackson was a fan of Weird Al’s music.

Weird Al didn't think that Michael Jackson would agree to a parody of "Beat It," but was pleasantly surprised to hear from his representatives that Michael thought "Eat It" was funny. Years later, when Yankovic came up with the idea for "Fat" for Jackson's "Bad," Jackson not only agreed to the parody, but told him he could use the set from his "Badder" music video for "Fat," which went on to win the 1988 Grammy for Best Concept Music Video.

The two met in person twice: The first time was backstage at one of Michael's shows, where Weird Al presented Jackson with a gold record of the album Even Worse. The second time was after a TV show taping, where Jackson said he would screen UHF to his friends at Neverland Ranch. When the two were studio neighbors working on their respective albums, Al would occasionally receive a little note in the door reading "Hello from next door," signed "Love, MJ."

11. Despite being a fan of the comedic performer, Michael Jackson wouldn’t let “Weird Al” record a parody of "Black or White."

"Snack All Night" was slated to be Yankovic's interpretation of "Black or White," but Michael "wasn't quite so into it." The fact that Jackson considered "Black or White" a "message" song made him uncomfortable with any comedy undercutting it. Weird Al later admitted that Jackson did him a "huge favor," helping him avoid becoming someone just known as the guy doing Michael Jackson parodies, and steering him towards his commercial success in 1992 lampooning Nirvana instead. While "Snack All Night" has never been recorded in a studio, it has been played a few times at Weird Al shows.

12. “Weird Al” Yankovic wrote a song in 1986 called "Christmas At Ground Zero."

The 1986 single off of Polka Party! was a response by Weird Al to the Scotti Bros. record label, who had been trying to get him to record a Christmas song for two years. There's some debate as to whether or not radio stations banned the record, but the macabre nature of the song, which is set in a world where a nuclear war is about to break out, limited its commercial airplay anyway. The term "ground zero" changing from a general description of where some sort of detonation took place to a term associated with the events of September 11th made radio airplay even scarcer—although Dr. Demento claims it's still a favorite of his listeners, and was the most requested Christmas song since "Grandma Got Run Over By A Reindeer."

13. Nirvana revitalized Weird Al's career.

After the commercial failure of 1989's UHF (despite its Neverland Ranch popularity), Yankovic returned to the recording studio in June 1990 to record original songs for a new album. When it came time to record the parodies, he ran into a problem: There was nothing good to make fun of. After getting turned down by Michael Jackson with "Black and White," Al was open to discover Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit," which Yankovic changed to "Smells Like Nirvana." The song made fun of the fact that it was nearly impossible to understand Nirvana singer Kurt Cobain's words. The Nirvana album Nevermind and its instantly iconic cover of a baby chasing a dollar bill underwater gave Al the concept for his album, which he titled Off the Deep End, alluding to the cover art of Yankovic swimming after a doughnut on a fishhook. In the "Smells Like Nirvana" music video, Al even used the same janitor in the "Smells Like Teen Spirit" video, as well as some of the cheerleaders.

14. Coolio was not at all cool about “Amish Paradise.”

After "Amish Paradise," Weird Al always made sure to speak directly with the artists and never to rely on their management. The 1996 song based on "Gangsta's Paradise" annoyed Coolio at the time, saying something that indicated Michael Jackson's influence: "I ain't with that. No. I didn't give it any sanction. I think that my song was too serious. It ain't like it was 'Beat It.' 'Beat It' was a party song. But I think 'Gangsta's Paradise' represented something more than that. And I really, honestly and truly, don't appreciate him desecrating the song like that."

Weird Al apologized, claiming that Coolio's managers and label gave Yankovic the belief that Coolio was OK with the parody. One year later, Coolio rapped the couplet, "Fools be in the bars unadvanced with a switch/Uppercuts and fight kicks with Weird Al Yankovich" on his song "Throwdown 2000." Coolio eventually got over it, and approached Yankovic at the 2006 Consumer Electronics Show to make peace.

Asked later about the whole incident, Coolio said he really thought it out. "I was like, 'Wait a minute.' I was like, 'Coolio, who the f—k do you think you are? He did Michael Jackson. Michael Jackson didn't get mad,'" adding that complaining about "Amish Paradise" was "one of the dumbest things I did in my career" and that the parody was "funny as sh--." Coolio claimed that Al invited him to appear in Weird Al's 3-D film Al's Brain, but the money figure wasn't to the rapper's satisfaction.

15. Prince repeatedly refused to be parodied, and didn’t want Weird Al to even look at him.

Throughout the '80s and early '90s, Yankovic repeatedly asked for permission to satirize Prince's work, but was always denied—to the point where he eventually got the hint. To seemingly indicate that it was personal, Al received a telegram for Prince's lawyers the night before an American Music Awards demanding that he not make eye contact with the Minnesota native. Yankovic would later learn that other musicians that were also seated within Prince's vicinity received the same note, and admitted that he looked at him a few times.

16. Eminem denied permission to make a music video for the "Lose Yourself" parody.

Even though Eminem agreed to allow "Lose Yourself" to be parodied in audio form as "Couch Potato," he refused permission to make a music video of the song. Yankovic claimed that Eminem's reasoning was that it would "be harmful to his image or career." The video would have been a pastiche of scenes from other Eminem videos. Because every first single from Yankovic was typically heavily promoted by a music video, this scrapped all plans to make "Couch Potato" the lead single on Weird Al's 2003 album Poodle Hat.

17. "White & Nerdy" is the highest charting song of Weird Al's career.

Chamillionaire couldn't be happier when Weird Al parodied his "Ridin'," claiming that it gave the song "mega-record" status and credited it for giving him the 2007 Grammy for Best Rap Performance By a Duo or Group. The "White & Nerdy" video has amassed over 86 million views on YouTube as of this writing, and features Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele years before their popular Comedy Central show Key & Peele went on the air. It was and currently is Yankovic's only Billboard Top 100 hit to make the top 10, peaking at #9 on the chart in the United States.

18. Weird Al mistakenly thought Lady Gaga did not approve of his "Born This Way" parody.

Al was finished with writing and recording his 2011 album Alpocalypse, his follow-up to 2006's Straight Outta Lynwood, but delayed its release for months to wait for one big hit to record a parody version of to release as a first single to start the album's promotion. "Perform This Way" was his take on the suddenly popular Lady Gaga's "Born This Way," but after being told by Gaga's manager that she wanted to read the lyrics and hear a recorded version first, Yankovic was ultimately told he was denied permission in April 2011. Resigned to having to delay the album's release further and record another song, Al posted "Perform This Way" on YouTube so his work wouldn't completely go to waste. Within the day of its posting and its subsequent positive reviews from social media, it came out that Lady Gaga never heard the song in the first place, and she actually loved it. By the end of that day, Alpocalypse's release date was set.

19. Singer Don McLean has confused his own “American Pie” with Weird Al's version in concert.

"The Saga Begins" finds Yankovic as Obi-Wan Kenobi recounting the plot of Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace to the tune of Don McLean's "American Pie." Yankovic managed to write the lyrics based on spoilers he had read on the internet leading up to the movie's release. He attended a $500-a-ticket pre-screening for charity just to make sure his information was correct, and claimed to only need to make a couple of minor tweaks to the song. George Lucas was a fan, but Don McLean might no longer be so much of one. According to Yankovic, McLean's children started to play "The Saga Begins" so much in his home that when McLean performed "American Pie" in concert, he would lose focus and sing bits of "The Saga Begins" by accident.

20. The number 27 comes up often in "Weird Al" Yankovic's work.

At first, Yankovic used the number 27 just because it fit well as a lyric and because it was a "pretty funny number." When a fan called attention to the references to 27 in the "Like a Surgeon" and "This is the Life" videos, Weird Al started to use the number more often. Some references are straightforward, such as Al claiming to have eaten every Twinkie on 27th Avenue in "Fat," or the seeing a Take 27 on the clapboard during the faked moon landing scene in the "Foil" video. Some connections are tenuous, such as the factoid that Yankovic traveled 28,457 miles in his 2010 tour, 2 and 7 being the first and last digits of that number.