10 Smurfy Facts About the Smurfs

Cindy Ord /Getty
Cindy Ord /Getty

Here at the Quick 10, we're taking a break from our regularly-scheduled Halloween posts to bring you this public service announcement: it was 51 years ago this week that The Smurfs were first introduced to our pop culture vernacular. I thought it seemed like a pretty worthy reason to break the spooky string of posts, and anyway, I bet at least one of you flossers spent a Halloween or two slathering yourself in blue paint to portray one of the sapphire shorties (you'll let us know if you did, right?).

Keystone/Hulton Archive / Getty

1. The Smurfs were invented as a result of a silly conversation over dinner. Pierre Culliford, a Belgian artist known as Peyo, was dining with a friend when he had one of those momentary lapses of vocabulary that we all experience from time to time "“ he couldn't remember the word for "salt" and asked his friend to pass the "schtroumpf." Mocking him, his friend responded with, "Here's the schtroumpf. When you are done schtroumpfing, schtroumpf it back." This sparked an idea, and "les Schtroumpfs" were born in comic strip form shortly thereafter. This, of course, was translated to "The Smurfs" when they hit the American market.

2. The cartoon series was created when an NBC executive spied his daughter playing with a plush Smurf doll. After observing how much she loved the doll, he decided that the Schtroumpfs might be a good fit for his Saturday morning cartoon-fest. It was; it aired for nine seasons.

3. The Smurfs are specifically "three apples" tall.

Wikimedia Commons

4. The white hat the Smurfs all wear has been around for ages and are called Phrygian caps. They're often considered symbols of liberty and were once found on the tops of Liberty Poles. You can see one on the seal of the United States Senate as well.
5. Because the Smurfs shared all of their possessions, some people thought this was a barely veiled attempt to brainwash children into Communist ways. Of course, some people also thought the Phrygian hats meant that the Smurfs were a sect of the Ku Klux Klan, and others claimed the Smurfs were neo-Nazis promoting an Aryan race because of the lone, blonde female in the group. In fact, none of those things were true. Peyo's son has stated that the Smurfs had no political undertones at all, and the only messages his father wished to impart were those of friendship and love.

6. Karenna Gore's Secret Service code name was Smurfette, which she has apparently regretted ever since. In 1997, she said, "Ever since I was put on the spot and told 'two syllables' and 'It has to start with an S,' I have been cringing in the back seat when identified as 'Smurfette'."

7. The answer to the age-old question "What color does a Smurf turn when it's choking?" is purple. At least we can assume it's purple, based on the episode where a Smurf decides to hold his breath.
8. The Smurfs showed up at a bunch of Kings Entertainment amusement parks in the mid '80s. King's Island near Cincinnati had a boat ride that took people through the Smurf village, King's Dominion had Smurf Mountain, Great America had a little roller coaster called The Blue Streak, and Carowinds had a children's play area called Smurf Island. Since then, they have all been replaced with different rides.

9. There are some Smurfs from the original comics that never made it to the cartoon. These include Alchemist Smurf, Timid Smurf, Enamored Smurf, Finance Smurf (whoo-hoo! How fun for kids!), Mango Smurf, Lumberjack Smurf, Pastrycook Smurf, Submariner Smurf and Navigator Smurf.

iStock / ollo

10. The World Record for People Dressed as Smurfs (I can't shake the feeling that the plural should be Smurves. I know. So wrong.) was set just this year in Swansea, Wales. More than 2,500 people crammed into a nightclub dressed in blue and white and weren't allowed to have any natural skin showing in order to count toward the record. The previous record had been set just a year earlier, with 1,253 Smurfs gathered in Castleblayney, Ireland.

Oh, and I've had this stuck in my head ever since I got the idea for this post, so in hopes that passing it along will get it out of my brain, here you go:

Looking to Downsize? You Can Buy a 5-Room DIY Cabin on Amazon for Less Than $33,000

Five rooms of one's own.
Five rooms of one's own.
Allwood/Amazon

If you’ve already mastered DIY houses for birds and dogs, maybe it’s time you built one for yourself.

As Simplemost reports, there are a number of house kits that you can order on Amazon, and the Allwood Avalon Cabin Kit is one of the quaintest—and, at $32,990, most affordable—options. The 540-square-foot structure has enough space for a kitchen, a bathroom, a bedroom, and a sitting room—and there’s an additional 218-square-foot loft with the potential to be the coziest reading nook of all time.

You can opt for three larger rooms if you're willing to skip the kitchen and bathroom.Allwood/Amazon

The construction process might not be a great idea for someone who’s never picked up a hammer, but you don’t need an architectural degree to tackle it. Step-by-step instructions and all materials are included, so it’s a little like a high-level IKEA project. According to the Amazon listing, it takes two adults about a week to complete. Since the Nordic wood walls are reinforced with steel rods, the house can withstand winds up to 120 mph, and you can pay an extra $1000 to upgrade from double-glass windows and doors to triple-glass for added fortification.

Sadly, the cool ceiling lamp is not included.Allwood/Amazon

Though everything you need for the shell of the house comes in the kit, you will need to purchase whatever goes inside it: toilet, shower, sink, stove, insulation, and all other furnishings. You can also customize the blueprint to fit your own plans for the space; maybe, for example, you’re going to use the house as a small event venue, and you’d rather have two or three large, airy rooms and no kitchen or bedroom.

Intrigued? Find out more here.

[h/t Simplemost]

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Miss the Arcade? This Retro Arcade Cabinet Brings Ms. Pac-Man and Galaga to Your Home

Amazon
Amazon

It's hard to find a video game character more iconic than Pac-Man, but his female counterpart gave him a run for his money when she debuted in 1982. Now, Ms. Pac-Man is available to purchase as a retro arcade cabinet taken straight from the golden age of gaming.

The arcade cabinet, which is selling on Amazon for $3300, combines Ms. Pac-Man with the classic space shooter game Galaga. The hardware also includes the hidden bonus games Pac-Man, Speedy Pac-Man, Speedy Ms. Pac-Man, and Rapid Fire Galaga.

Playing Ms. Pac-Man on the cabinet at home feels just like playing in a real arcade. The joystick and buttons that players remember have been faithfully recreated. There's even a coin slot like you'd find in the real game, but this one has been deactivated so you can chase your high score for hours without stocking up on change. The side panel is decorated with the original Ms. Pac-Man artwork, making the cabinet an eye-catching piece of home decor even when you're not using it.

If you have space in your basement, rec room, or any room in your house for a 5.6-foot-tall arcade cabinet, you can order the product from Amazon today with free shipping. If you're looking for a more low-key way to celebrate your love of Pac-Man, Monopoly recently released a special Pac-Man edition game complete with a miniature arcade cabinet.

This article contains affiliate links to products selected by our editors. Mental Floss may receive a commission for purchases made through these links.