4 Famous People Convicted of Perjury

Jamie McCarthy, Getty Images for Live Nation
Jamie McCarthy, Getty Images for Live Nation

Baseball fans got a mild surprise last week when news broke that former pitcher Roger Clemens was being indicted for perjury for allegedly lying during a 2008 Congressional hearing on performance-enhancing drug use. The Rocket is hardly the first celebrity to run into trouble for perjury, though. Take a look at these other famous folks who ran afoul of the law for perjuring themselves.

1. Lil' Kim

Lil' Kim
Maury Phillips, Getty Images

In 2001 rapper Lil' Kim witnessed a heated gunfight outside New York radio station Hot 97's studios. The shootout between Kim's entourage and the rival rap group Capone-N-Noreago included over two dozen shots fired. When a federal grand jury called Lil' Kim to testify about what she had seen during the firefight, she claimed not to have noticed her manager and another member of her entourage at the scene.

The false testimony might have worked if not for security camera footage that showed one of the men in question actually holding a door open for Kim. In 2005 she was convicted of three counts of perjury and one of conspiracy in connection to her fabricated testimony. She received a sentence of one year and a day in prison and a $5,000 fine. Lil' Kim ended up only serving 10 months of the sentence at the Federal Detention Center in Philadelphia before being released.

2. Marion Jones

Marion Jones
Matthew Stockman, Getty Images

Jones cemented her claim to being the world's fastest woman at the 2000 Olympics, but her fall from grace was nearly as quick as her time in the 100 meters. Jones' association with users and distributors of performance-enhancing drugs quickly began raising eyebrows among track enthusiasts, but she remained adamant that she had dominated the running world without any chemical help.

Unfortunately for Jones, she maintained this stance even when interviewed by federal agents, who were investigating the infamous BALCO steroids case. Big mistake. In the face of mounting evidence that she had used PEDs, Jones pleaded guilty to two charges of perjury in 2007 and admitted that she had used the designer steroid The Clear. As part of her plea bargain, Jones received a sentence of six months imprisonment and two years of probation.

3. Mark Fuhrman

Murder in Brentwood cover
Amazon

Anyone who watched the O.J. Simpson murder trial remembers Mark Fuhrman, the LAPD detective who provided key testimony in the unsuccessful prosecution of the football star. One of the key sticking points in the trial was whether or not the detective had habitually used a variety of racial slurs with colleagues and suspects. Fuhrman vehemently denied these charges, but Simpson's defense team was able to turn up multiple witnesses and a tape of Fuhrman spewing hateful slurs.

Not only did Fuhrman's poor choice of words severely damage the prosecution's efforts, they got Fuhrman into some pretty hot water, too. Following the Simpson trial the state attorney general filed perjury charges against Fuhrman for his lying over the use of racial slurs throughout the trial. In 1996 Fuhrman entered a plea of no contest to the charges and received a sentence of three years probation and a $200 fine.

Although Fuhrman didn't spend time in prison, his status as a convicted felon meant he could no longer serve as a police officer. Oddly, his perjury conviction means that he is the only person to be convicted of a crime in connection with the infamous case.

4. Jeffrey Archer

Jeffrey Archer
Indranil Mukherjee, AFP/Getty Images

Archer's name might not be too familiar to American readers, but he was quite a godsend for the British tabloids throughout the 80s and 90s. Archer, a longtime Member of Parliament, developed quite a successful side career as a novelist; his 1979 book Kane and Abel even reached the top spot on the New York Times bestseller list.

Throughout the early 1980s, Archer rose through the Conservative Party hierarchy, but his political career came to a screeching halt in 1986 when News of the World published a story detailing how Archer had paid a prostitute £2,000 to go abroad. Rival paper the Daily Star explained that the payment stemmed from Archer's former paid relationship with the prostitute in question. Archer in turn sued the Daily Star for libel and explained that he was simply being philanthropic by helping out a down-on-her-luck prostitute with some travel funding. The story sounded odd, but nevertheless Archer won the case and a £500,000 award.

Archer came out of the libel trial relatively unscathed politically, but when he received the nod to be the Conservative candidate in the 2000 London mayoral election, News of the World published a story about how Archer had perjured himself in the 1987 trial. Former friends who had supported Archer's version of events at the earlier trial changed their stories, and he was eventually found guilty of perjury and perverting the course of justice in 2001. Thus, the political bigwig and bestselling author spent two full years in an English jail.

This Course Will Teach You How to Play Guitar Like a Pro for $29

BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images
BartekSzewczyk/iStock via Getty Images

Be honest: You’ve watched a YouTube video or two in an attempt to learn how to play a song on the guitar. Whether it was through tabs or simply copying whatever you saw on the screen, the fun always ends when friends start throwing out requests for songs you have no idea how to play. So how about you actually learn how to play guitar for real this time?

It’s now possible to learn guitar from home with the Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle, which is currently on sale for $29. Grab that Gibson, Fender, or whatever you have handy, and learn to strum rhythms from scratch.

The strumming course will teach you how to count beats and rests to turn your hands and fingers into the perfect accompaniment for your own voice or other musicians. Then, you can take things a step further and learn advanced jamming and soloing to riff anytime, anywhere. This course will teach you to improvise across various chords and progressions so you can jump into any jam with something original. You’ll also have the chance to dive deep into the major guitar genres of bluegrass, blues, and jazz. Lessons in jam etiquette, genre history, and how to read music will separate you from a novice player.

This bundle also includes courses in ear training so you can properly identify any relative note, interval, or pitch. That way, you can play along with any song when it comes on, or even understand how to modify it into the key you’d prefer. And when the time comes to perform, be prepared with skilled hammer-ons, pull-offs, slides, bends, trills, vibrato, and fret-tapping. Not only will you learn the basic foundations of guitar, you’ll ultimately be able to develop your own style with the help of these lessons.

The Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle is discounted for a limited time. Act on this $29 offer now to work on those fingertip calluses and play like a pro.

 

The Ultimate Beginner to Expert Guitar Lessons Bundle - $29

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How the Trapper Keeper Trapped the Hearts of '80s and '90s Kids

Courtesy of Cinzia Reale-Castello
Courtesy of Cinzia Reale-Castello

No matter when or where you grew up, back-to-school shopping typically revolved around two things: clothing and school supplies. And if you’re an adult of a certain age, you probably had a Trapper Keeper on that latter list of must-buy items.

Like the stickers, skins, and cases that adorn your smartphones and laptops today, Trapper Keepers were a way for kids to express their individual personalities. The three-ring binders dominated classrooms in the '80s and '90s, and featured a vast array of designs—from colorful Lisa Frank illustrations to photos of cool cars and popular celebrities—that allowed kids to customize their organizational tools. 

In this episode of "Throwback," we're ripping open the Velcro cover and digging into the history of the Trapper Keeper. You can watch the full episode below.

Be sure to head here and subscribe so you don't miss an episode of "Throwback," where we explore the fascinating stories behind some of the greatest toys and trends from your childhood.