8 Creative Periodic Tables

The Periodic Table of the Elements is a wonderful aid in understanding chemistry, if you understand the reasons the elements are sorted the way they are. The table itself is a model of information classification. No wonder folks want to use this structure to classify other types of information -although science geeks can see right away whether the artist really understands the original table. That said, we can all enjoy periodic tables of items other than elements.

1. Advice Animals

In the past year or so, the internet has experienced a proliferation of image macro memes featuring animals giving (humorous but useless) advice. To keep up with the barrage, Know Your Meme constructed the Periodic Table of Advice Animals. This is a large table; only a small portion is shown here. And since it was published two-and-a-half weeks ago, there are probably newer memes that are not included.

2. Storytelling

DeviantART member Computer Sherpa made the Periodic Table of Storytelling for a Visual Design class. The shape differs a little from the periodic table of elements, but that's because this one really works for the purpose of classifying the elements of storytelling. Exploring the tropes in this table could cause you to miss work today, so you might want to save it for the weekend. Shown here is a screenshot taken from the middle of the table. You can buy this table as an art print.

3. Sandwichery

The Periodic Table of Sandwichery is an art poster containing instructions for making 58 different sandwiches. As far as I can tell, you'll have to buy one to actually read any of the ingredient lists, but I am always open to a new sandwich recipe!

4. Baseball Hall of Famers

The Periodic Table of Hall of Famers is headed by Babe Ruth on the left and Walter Johnson on the right. We only have room for a part of it here, but at Wezen-Ball, you can see that the full version classifies players as The Nobles, Highly Temperamental, The Radioactives, Relievers, 500 Home Run Club, 3000 Hits Club, Short-Lived, 300 Wins Club, Traditional, and Primarily Defense. Sports fans can argue all day about who belongs where.

5. Middle Class

The London creative agency Not Actual Size produced the Periodic Table of the Middle Class to promote The Middle Class Handbook, which explores how Britain's middle class is becoming fragmented into subcultures that coalesce around tastes instead of income level. Only a portion is shown here; luckily, the website includes an explanation for each "element."

6. Cookies

The last three periodic tables in this list are the original table of elements, with a twist. Mrs. Humble at Not So Humble Pie made cookies and arranged them into a periodic table! The resulting Science Cookies were a hit for Thanksgiving. She says cooking is a lot like chemistry.

Really the only difference is, in chemistry you never get to lick your spoons.

7. Building Blocks

Periodic Table Building Blocks are designed for science students from one to three years old, although adults love them as well. The twenty blocks contains all the elements, so you'd need to buy three sets in order to see them all at once, but that's not really necessary for learning the elements -or for building a baby fort!

8. The Periodic Coffee Table

The Periodic Coffee Table of Elements is expensive, but oh-so-impressive. The cells contain samples of the actual elements!

By embedding all element samples in clear acrylic, they are beautifully presented and also protected from tarnishing. This format also helps to addresses health and safety issues, as all potentially toxic or corrosive substances are permanently encased in a thick layer of robust resin. Argon gas and mineral oil is further used to ampoule reactive samples and preserve their freshly cut appearance. Individual acrylic blocks are available for sale, although read the shipping section carefully as some elements are costly to send internationally.

The table was designed in partnership with Theodore Gray, who produced the periodic table of elements as a pieces of furniture with element samples. Gray's original table was featured in the first post of this series.

Previously:

The earliest post on this subject, Periodic Tableware includes comic book characters, desserts, and funk music. And a couple of real tables you can work or eat at!

More Periodic Tableware covers those of candy, vegetables, website, and mathematicians. And don’t forget the periodic table shower curtain available in the mental_floss store!

8 Alternative Periodic Tables looked at the subjects of cupcakes, typefaces, printing projects, cartoons, video game characters, videos about the real elements, LEGO® bricks, and something called awesoments which will become clear when you take a look.

8 Odd Periodic Tables has tables for elephants, Chuck Norris, social media, game controllers, mixology, rejected elements, interacting elements, and vulgarity.

9 Strange Periodic Tables was heavy on food, as we looked at periodic tables of pumpkins, beer, Gummi Bears, Scoville Units, Canada, smellaments, a picnic table, and a periodic table of periodic tables.

8 Curious Periodic Tables covered Mad Men, rock-n-roll, breakfast cereals, cheese, herbs and spices, produce storage, super powers, and irrationality.

Turn Your LEGO Bricks Into a Drone With the Flybrix Drone Kit

Flyxbrix/FatBrain
Flyxbrix/FatBrain

Now more than ever, it’s important to have a good hobby. Of course, a lot of people—maybe even you—have been obsessed with learning TikTok dances and baking sourdough bread for the last few months, but those hobbies can wear out their welcome pretty fast. So if you or someone you love is looking for something that’s a little more intellectually stimulating, you need to check out the Flybrix LEGO drone kit from Fat Brain Toys.

What is a Flybrix LEGO Drone Kit?

The Flybrix drone kit lets you build your own drones out of LEGO bricks and fly them around your house using your smartphone as a remote control (via Bluetooth). The kit itself comes with absolutely everything you need to start flying almost immediately, including a bag of 56-plus LEGO bricks, a LEGO figure pilot, eight quick-connect motors, eight propellers, a propeller wrench, a pre-programmed Flybrix flight board PCB, a USB data cord, a LiPo battery, and a USB LiPo battery charger. All you’ll have to do is download the Flybrix Configuration Software, the Bluetooth Flight Control App, and access online instructions and tutorials.

Experiment with your own designs.

The Flybrix LEGO drone kit is specifically designed to promote exploration and experimentation. All the components are tough and can totally withstand a few crash landings, so you can build and rebuild your own drones until you come up with the perfect design. Then you can do it all again. Try different motor arrangements, add your own LEGO bricks, experiment with different shapes—this kit is a wannabe engineer’s dream.

For the more advanced STEM learners out there, Flybrix lets you experiment with coding and block-based coding. It uses an arduino-based hackable circuit board, and the Flybrix app has advanced features that let you try your hand at software design.

Who is the Flybrix LEGO Drone Kit for?

Flybrix is a really fun way to introduce a number of core STEM concepts, which makes it ideal for kids—and technically, that’s who it was designed for. But because engineering and coding can get a little complicated, the recommended age for independent experimentation is 13 and up. However, kids younger than 13 can certainly work on Flybrix drones with the help of their parents. In fact, it actually makes a fantastic family hobby.

Ready to start building your own LEGO drones? Click here to order your Flybrix kit today for $198.

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How to Brew Your Own Fluorescent Beer at Home

The Odin
The Odin

If you're one of the many people who made their own sourdough starter in quarantine, you already know yeast is a living thing. That means its biological makeup can be tweaked using genetic engineering. As Gizmodo reports, that's exactly what a former NASA biologist has done to create his new fluorescent yeast kits.

A few years ago, Josiah Zayner left his job as a synthetic biologist for NASA to found The Odin, a company that lets anyone experiment with genetic science at home. His recently launched yeast kit accomplishes this in an eye-catching way. Thanks to a fluorescent protein from jellyfish, yeast that's been genetically modified with the kit glows green under a black or blue light.

Despite looking like a prop from a sci-fi film, the yeast is still yeast. That means it can be used in home-brewing projects if you want to take the science experiment a step further. According to Eater, yeast made with the kit ferments and fluoresces when added to honey and water. If you brew a batch of beer with the right amount of yeast, the final product will emit an otherworldly glow when viewed under a blacklight. The kit hasn't been FDA approved, but the company states the materials are nontoxic and nonallergenic, and beer made with it will still taste like beer.

You can purchase a fluorescent yeast kit from The Odin's online shop for $169. If you're looking for more ways to experiment with genetic technology at home, the company also sells kits that let you play with frog and bacteria DNA.

[h/t Gizmodo]