Is This Really the Busiest Travel Day?

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So far, it seems that airport delays and other inconveniences have been minimal today, a good sign for millions of Thanksgiving travelers. That especially bodes well after the traditional hand-wringing about the busiest travel day of the year.

But is today actually the busiest travel day of the year? That depends how you're going, but for airlines the answer is a clear no. And it's not even close.

Federal statistics found that in recent years, the Wednesday before Thanksgiving didn't rank in the top 25 busiest travel days of the year for air travel, including a ranking of 55th in 2007 and 36th in 2006. Likewise, the days before Christmas generally rank below the top 20. Airports are expected to be much more crowded on weekends in the summer, when families are taking off for vacations.

For drivers, however, Thanksgiving is a rough time. According to AAA surveys, roughly 90 percent of the people going more than 50 miles will drive. This year, that's making Thanksgiving the busiest travel holiday since the start of the recession, with 42.5 million people traveling. Of those, 38.2 million are going by car, with another 3.4 million flying.

Interestingly, most of the travel that AA predicts will come on Thanksgiving day, not the day before. And airlines have said that during the Thanksgiving weekend, it's the return trips on Sunday and Monday that contribute to most of the traffic, rather than Wednesday being the busiest day.

That said, it's going to be more expensive to travel across the board. AAA found that gas, hotels and airline tickets and Amtrak round trip tickets had all risen in price compared to last year, with median spending expected to be $554 per person for the entire weekend.

Hotel in Japan Is Offering Rooms for $1 Per Night—If You Agree to Livestream Your Stay

DragonImages/iStock via Getty Images
DragonImages/iStock via Getty Images

Many people are happy to document their vacations online without getting paid to do it. Now, as The Washington Post reports, exhibitionists who can't resist low prices are now eligible to book a hotel room in Fukuoka, Japan for just $1 a night. In return, they must agree to livestream their experience.

Tetsuya Inoue, the manager of Asahi Ryokan in Fukuoka, got the idea for the marketing stunt after one of his guests broadcast his stay voluntarily. Inoue figured that if people are already comfortable sharing their private moments in the hotel with the world, he might as well use that to his advantage.

The "One Dollar Hotel" promotion is a way for Inoue to bring attention to the 30-year-old guesthouse, which is owned by his grandmother. For $1—a fee that covers lodging, taxes, and tips—customers have access to a room that normally costs $27 a night. As guests eat, sleep, and get ready for the day, a camera installed in the room livestreams their every move to the hotel's YouTube channel. The only place where they have privacy is in the bathroom. Signs in the room warn guests not to engage in any "lewd acts" and to keep passports and credit cards out of the camera's field of view.

In addition to generating publicity for Asahi Ryokan, Inoue hopes that his YouTube videos will eventually become popular enough to monetize. Five guests have agreed to the deal so far, and after launching in October, the One Dollar Hotel YouTube channel already has close to 15,000 subscribers.

[h/t The Washington Post]

Planning a Trip? These Are the 10 U.S. Airlines Most Likely to Bump You

shironosov/iStock via Getty Images
shironosov/iStock via Getty Images

Booking your trip home for the holidays in advance is no guarantee you'll make it on the plane. Even after driving to the airport, making it through security, and getting to your gate on time, there's still a chance you'll be bumped from the flight you originally paid for. Overbooking is part of most airlines' business models, so there's no way to completely safeguard yourself against this inconvenient scenario. But in addition to paying extra for a higher-class ticket and checking in early as possible, you can reduce your risk of getting bumped by knowing which airlines are most likely to do it.

Frontier Airlines and Spirit Airlines are by far the most notorious when it comes to bumping passengers, Travel + Leisure reports. They were the stand-out airlines in a recent analysis by Upgraded Points that looked at which U.S. commercial aviation companies are most likely to involuntarily deny boarding to customers.

According to the report, Frontier bumped 6.28 people per every 100,000 passengers in 2018. In that same year, Spirit bumped 5.57 out of every 100,000 passengers. Those airlines were twice as likely as any other name on the list to stop people from boarding their flights. The closest behind them was Alaska Airlines with 2.3 bumps per every 100,000 customers.

The good news is that your overall chances of getting bumped from a flight are smaller than they were a few years ago. Upgraded Points found that the phenomena reached its peak in the second half of 2016, and rates had dropped significantly by the end of 2018.

If you'd still like to do everything in your power to make sure you make it onto your flight, check out the list below of the airlines that bump the most passengers before booking your holiday travel. And if you have been bumped in the past, here's how to collect the compensation you may be owed.

  1. Frontier Airlines
  1. Spirit Airlines
  1. Alaska Airlines
  1. PSA Airlines
  1. American Airlines
  1. Mesa Airlines
  1. Skywest Airlines
  1. Southwest Airlines
  1. Allegiant Air
  1. Republic Airlines

[h/t Travel + Leisure]

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