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Why Is Pink Lemonade Pink?

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Reader Michael Lefebvre asked us on Twitter: "What is the origin of Pink Lemonade?"

The pink drink first appeared in the United States around the mid-1800s, primarily at circuses and carnivals and then at street stands in New York City. The drink's origins and inventor are heavily disputed though, and a handful of men have been credited with its creation. Of those, here are the best origin stories we could dig up from circus history:

• Henry E. “Bunk Allen” Allott ran away from home to join the circus at the age of 15 and worked a concession stand. He claims his creation was a total accident and that, while he was preparing a batch of regular lemonade, he bumped a table and knocked several pounds of red cinnamon candies into the mix. He had customers waiting and didn't want to take the time to make a new batch, so he gave out the pink stuff, and it became a hit. Allot died at the age of 40 and reportedly refused a visit from a priest on his deathbed, declaring that, “When I’m planted I want everybody to have a drink on me.”

• W.H.A. Tobey also claims to have made the first batch of pink lemonade by accident.

In the 1860s, he was working with Forepaugh’s circus. When they toured in the Southwest one summer, water was so scarce they couldn't even sell lemonade. One afternoon, Tobey went to check on the horses and found that a red blanket had fallen into their drinking water barrel. The colors ran and the water turned a dark pink color. The horses refused to drink it, so Tobey brought it to the lemonade man and suggested they sell a colored beverage. That night they started selling it and people loved it so much they made it at every stop from then on.

• William Henry Griffith makes a very similar claim, though it happened a decade later: He had a batch of lemonade ready for sale, when a performer's red tights blew off a clothesline and gave the drink a tint.

• An accident with red clothing also figures into Pete Conklin's story. Conklin was running a concession stand at Jere Mabie’s Big Show in the late 1850s when his lemonade ran out in the middle of a rush of customers. He didn't have any more water on hand, so he ran to the performers' dressing tent. He grabbed a tub that someone was wringing out a pair of red tights in and rushed back to the stand. He didn't notice until he started on another batch that the water was pink. There wasn't much else he could do, so he poured it into cups and started selling it as "strawberry lemonade,” making double his usual sales that day.

Another Answer

Red #40.

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Stradivarius Violins Get Their Distinctive Sound By Mimicking the Human Voice
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Italian violinist Francesco Geminiani once wrote that a violin's tone should "rival the most perfect human voice." Nearly three centuries later, scientists have confirmed that some of the world's oldest violins do in fact mimic aspects of the human singing voice, a finding which scientists believe proves "the characteristic brilliance of Stradivari violins."

Using speech analysis software, scientists in Taiwan compared the sound produced by 15 antique instruments with recordings of 16 male and female vocalists singing English vowel sounds, The Guardian reports. They discovered that violins made by Andrea Amati and Antonio Stradivari, the pioneers of the instrument, produce similar "formant features" as the singers. The resonance frequencies were similar between Amati violins and bass and baritone singers, while the higher-frequency tones produced by Stradivari instruments were comparable to tenors and contraltos.

Andrea Amati, born in 1505, was the first known violin maker. His design was improved over 100 years later by Antonio Stradivari, whose instruments now sell for several million dollars. "Some Stradivari violins clearly possess female singing qualities, which may contribute to their perceived sweetness and brilliance," Hwan-Ching Tai, an author of the study, told The Guardian.

Their findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. A 2013 study by Dr. Joseph Nagyvary, a professor emeritus at Texas A&M University, also pointed to a link between the sounds produced by 250-year-old violins and those of a female soprano singer.

According to Vox, a blind test revealed that professional violinists couldn't reliably tell the difference between old violins like "Strads" and modern ones, with most even expressing a preference for the newer instruments. However, the value of these antique instruments can be chalked up to their rarity and history, and many violinists still swear by their exceptional quality.

[h/t The Guardian]

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