CLOSE

The Other Doctors of Doctor Who

There are eleven Doctors on Doctor Who, right? Well, yes, but not exactly. Those are the "canonical eleven" — the official Doctors. But are you familiar with some of the others?

1. The Dalek Movie Doctor

In the mid-60s, Dalek Fever was sweeping England. Dalek creator Terry Nation secured the rights to produce two Doctor Who movies. The Daleks and Dalek Invasion Earth: 2150 AD starred legendary British actor Peter Cushing (famous for Hammer films and Sherlock Holmes, and later famous as Grand Moff Tarkin in the original Star Wars film). His Doctor was more affable than William Hartnell's, and was different in another crucial respect—he was human. In 2005, the revived series played homage to the movies by borrowing elements of the TARDIS console room set, including the police box doors visible on the interior.

The trailer for Dalek Invasion Earth: 2150 AD

2. The Other First Doctor

When the series turned 20 in 1983, it was decided to do a spectacular feature-length episode featuring all five Doctors. However, two were unavailable: Tom Baker had other commitments and William Hartnell had died several years before. Hartnell's role was crucial, and the decision was made, for the only time in the series' history, to recast a Doctor. They selected Richard Hurndall, who leaned towards Hartnell's later, softer seasons. Hartnell made a cameo, in the form of retransmitted footage from "The Dalek Invasion of Earth" as a cold open, the only cold open in the original series' history.

First part of The Five Doctors, special edition edit. Hurndall appears around 4:25.

3. The Eight Morbius Doctors

Time Lords have thirteen lives, right? Well, until 1976, that wasn't established, and it was presumed they could regenerate indefinitely. In "The Brain of Morbius," the Fourth Doctor battles a heinous Gallifreyan criminal named Morbius, who is now reduced to a brain forced to live in a hideous, cobbled-together body. During a mental duel, the Doctor's past lives appear: Jon Pertwee, Patrick Troughton, William Hartnell... and then members of the production crew: George Gallacio, Robert Holmes, Graeme Harper, Douglas Camfield, Philip Hinchcliffe, Christopher Baker, Robert Banks Stewart, and Christopher Barry. After the 13-life limit was established, these eight became non-canon.

This clip is from the end of the story, so view with caution. The past Doctors show up around 14:00.

4. The Other Fourth Doctor: The Stage Doctor

In 1974, Doctor Who arrived on the stage in a production called Doctor Who and the Daleks in the Seven Keys to Doomsday, in a plot very loosely based on a TV serial, "The Keys of Marinus." Actor Trevor Martin was cast in the role, as an alternate version of the Fourth Doctor. He reprised the role a few years ago for an audio drama version of the story that is presently available on CD from Big Finish Productions.


These posters are for the stage and audio play versions of the story.

5. The Comic Relief: Red Nose Day Doctors

"Doctor Who and the Curse of Fatal Death" was a charity production for the Red Nose Day 1999 telethon. The story followed the Ninth Doctor as he announced his retirement and intention to get married, much to the disgust of the Master (played delightfully over-the-top by Jonathon Pryce), who teams up with the Daleks to destroy their mutual foe. Hijinks ensue, and the Ninth Doctor, played by Rowan Atkinson, ends up burning through all of his remaining regenerations as Richard E. Grant, Jim Broadbent, Hugh Grant, and, lastly, Joanna Lumley.

The full-length, official YouTube release by Red Nose Day

6. The Shalka Doctor

To celebrate the 40th anniversary in 2003, the BBC decided to try something new: an animated, webcast series, fully intended to be canonical. The Ninth Doctor was cast as Richard E. Grant, and "The Scream of Shalka" was produced and broadcast. It was reasonably successful, but it was quickly overtaken by Russell T. Davies' effort to revive the series live-action and became non-canon.

Part one of "The Scream of Shalka"

7. The Valeyard

Season 23, "The Trial of a Time Lord." The Sixth Doctor is on trial, and his prosecutor is a mysterious and sinister fellow called the Valeyard. But the Doctor realizes that the evidence has been tampered with, and it is eventually revealed that the Valeyard is in fact a possible future incarnation of the Doctor, and he has been promised all of the Doctor's remaining lives if he can get a conviction. Played with malevolent grace by Michael Jayston, the Valeyard escapes at the end of the serial, never to be seen again.

The Doctor arrives on Gallifrey and meets the Valeyard, the Inquisitor, and his jury of Time Lord peers.

8. The Dream Lord

In "Amy's Choice," the Doctor, Amy, and Rory find themselves in a strange dilemma — a sadistic fellow called the Dream Lord, played by Toby Jones, appears in the TARDIS and explains they have to decide which of two scenarios are real, before they get killed in one of them. He turns out to be a manifestation of the Doctor's own unconscious, triggered by psychic pollen caught in the Time Rotor. Fans have since speculated that this is the part of the Doctor that could eventually become the Valeyard.

The Dream Lord appears and explains their predicament.

9. The Watcher

There's another not-quite Doctor on the series, and he appeared in "Logopolis," the dramatic conclusion to Tom Baker's tenure as the Fourth Doctor. In the distance, a curiously luminous figure is seen, watching silently and then disappearing, occasionally helping, but never speaking. Played by Adrian Gibbs, "The Watcher" is a transitional Doctor, sort of an advance version of Number Five who appears to assist in a time of great danger.

Fan-produced set of Watcher clips (not exhaustive) from "Logopolis"

nextArticle.image_alt|e
NBC
arrow
entertainment
15 Surprising Facts About Hill Street Blues
NBC
NBC

Until the impressive record was surpassed by The West Wing in 2000, Hill Street Blues held the title of most Emmy-awarded freshman series, with eight trophies for its debut season alone (despite its basement-level ratings). The drama that chronicled the lives of the men and women working the Hill Street police station beat has been credited with changing television ever since its debut in 1981.

Among Hill Street Blues's innovations are the use of handheld cameras, a large ensemble cast, multi-episode story arcs, and a mix of high drama and comedy—elements which still permeate the small screen today. Here are 15 facts about the groundbreaking series.

1. STEVEN BOCHCO AND MICHAEL KOZOLL CREATED IT, DESPITE NOT WANTING TO DO ANOTHER COP SHOW.

MTM Enterprises was specifically hired by NBC to create a cop show, so Steven Bochco (who later co-created L.A. Law and NYPD Blue) and Michael Kozoll (co-writer of First Blood) agreed to do it—as long as the network left them “completely alone to do whatever we want,” according to Bochco. NBC agreed, and the two wrote the pilot script in 10 days.

2. IT WAS INFLUENCED BY A 1977 DOCUMENTARY.

The show's creators looked to The Police Tapes, a 1977 documentary that chronicled a South Bronx police precinct during a particularly hostile time in New York City's history, for inspiration. NBC's then-president Fred Silverman was inspired to create a cop show in the first place after seeing Fort Apache, the Bronx (1981), which stars Paul Newman as a veteran cop in a South Bronx police district.

3. BRUCE WEITZ HAD AN AGGRESSIVE AUDITION.

Bruce Weitz landed the role of undercover officer Mick Belker by playing the part. "I went to the audition dressed as how I thought the character should dress—and loud and pushy," Weitz recalled. "When I got into the room, I jumped up on [MTM co-founder] Grant Tinker's desk and went after his nose. I heard he said afterwards, 'There's no way I can't offer him the job.'"

4. JOE SPANO THOUGHT HE WAS MISCAST.

Joe Spano in 'Hill Street Blues'
NBC

Joe Spano auditioned for the role of Officer Andrew Renko, but ended up playing Lieutenant Henry Goldblume. “I was always disappointed that I didn’t end up playing Renko,” Spano told Playboy in 1983. Spano also wasn't a fan of his character's penchant for bow ties, which he claimed was Michael Kozoll's idea. "I fought it all the way," he said. "I thought it was a stereotypical thing to do. But it actually turned out to be right. You don’t play into the bow tie—you fight against it."

5. BARBARA BOSSON WAS BOCHCO’S WIFE, BUT WASN’T PLANNING ON BEING A SERIES REGULAR.

Barbara Bosson played Fay, Captain Frank Furillo’s ex-wife, who was only supposed to appear in the first episode in order to “contextualize” the captain, according to Bochco. But when Silverman watched the episode, he asked, “She’s going to be a regular, right?”

6. IT TOOK MIKE POST TWO HOURS TO WRITE THE ICONIC THEME SONG.

The composer—who also wrote the themes for The Greatest American Hero, Magnum, P.I., The A-Team, NYPD Blue, and Law & Order—was instructed by Bochco to write something “antithetical” to the visuals. Post wanted to add more orchestration to the piano piece; Bochco disagreed.

Post also spent four to five hours writing five minutes of new music for each episode of Hill Street Blues.

7. THE PILOT TESTED POORLY.

According to a network memo, among the many problems test audiences noted were that "the main characters were perceived as being not capable and having flawed personalities ... Audiences found the ending unsatisfying. There are too many loose ends ... 'Hill Street' did not come off as a real police station ... There was too much chaos in the station house, again reflecting that the police were incapable of maintaining control even on their home ground." NBC picked it up anyway.

8. RENKO WAS SUPPOSED TO DIE IN THE FIRST EPISODE, AND COFFEY WAS SUPPOSED TO DIE AT THE END OF THE FIRST SEASON.

Charles Haid had other projects lined up, so he agreed to take the part of Renko, a man destined to die almost immediately. But another series Haid was relying on didn’t get picked up, and NBC claimed Renko tested too well for him to meet an early end. Ed Marinaro's Coffey was meant to be shot and killed in “Jungle Madness,” the final episode of the first season. The ending was changed to make it a cliffhanger, and Marinaro’s character survived.

9. THEY HAD HISTORICALLY BAD SEASON ONE RATINGS.

A 'Hill Street Blues' cast photo
NBC Television/Getty Images

In its first season, Hill Street Blues show finished 87th out of 96 shows, making it the lowest-rated drama in television history to get a second season. Bochco credited the show’s renewal to two things: NBC being a last place network at the time, and the NBC sales department noticing that high-end advertisers were buying commercial time during the show.

10. THEY NEVER SPECIFIED WHERE THE SHOW WAS LOCATED, BUT IT’S PROBABLY CHICAGO.

The exterior of the Maxwell Street police station in Chicago filled in for the fictitious Hill Street precinct for the opening credits and background footage. It was added to the National Register of Historical Places in 1996 and is currently the University of Illinois at Chicago police department headquarters.

11. PLENTY OF FUTURE STARS MADE EARLY APPEARANCES.

Don Cheadle, James Cromwell, Laurence Fishburne, Tim Robbins, Andy Garcia, Cuba Gooding Jr., Danny Glover, Frances McDormand, and Michael Richards all found early work on the series.

12. SAMMY DAVIS JR. WANTED ON THE SHOW.

Sammy Davis Jr.
Michael Fresco, Evening Standard, Getty Images

Unfortunately, it never happened. Sometime after Bochco wrote in a reference to the singer, Davis Jr.and Bochco ran into each other. Davis Jr. said he loved it and started jumping up and down.

13. BOCHCO HAD A WAR WITH THE CENSORS.

Loving to use puns for titles, Bochco wanted to title an episode “Moon Over Uranus,” after Cape Canaveral was just in the news. Standards and Practices said no. Bochco eventually got his way, and proceeded to name the next two season three episodes “Moon Over Uranus: The Sequel” and “Moon Over Uranus: The Final Legacy.”

14. DAVID MILCH AND DICK WOLF’S CAREERS WERE LAUNCHED FROM IT.

David Milch (co-creator of NYPD Blue and creator of Deadwood) went from Yale writing teacher to a TV script writer through his former Yale roommate, Jeff Lewis. His first script for the show was season three's “Trial by Fury” episode, which won an Emmy, a WGA Award, and a Humanitas Prize. He later became an executive producer on the show. The first TV script credited to Dick Wolf (creator of the Law & Order franchise) was the season six episode, "Somewhere Over the Rambow." His first sole credit, for “What Are Friends For?,” earned Wolf an Emmy nomination in 1986.

It’s also worth noting that journalist and author Bob Woodward received a writing credit for season seven's “Der Roachenkavalier” and David Mamet penned the same season's “A Wasted Weekend” for his first television credit.

15. DENNIS FRANZ’S CHARACTER HAD A BRIEF, COMEDIC SPIN-OFF.

Dennis Franz (later Andy Sipowicz on NYPD Blue) first played corrupt cop Sal Benedetto in five episodes, before reappearing for the final two seasons as Lt. Norman Buntz. After Hill Street Blues ended its seven-season run, Franz reprised the latter character in Beverly Hills Buntz, which ran for one season beginning in 1987. In the 30-minute dramedy, Buntz was a private investigator after quitting the police force. Only nine episodes were broadcast by NBC.

nextArticle.image_alt|e
Getty Images
arrow
entertainment
Watch 18 Minutes of Julia Louis-Dreyfus Seinfeld Bloopers
Getty Images
Getty Images

Sometimes you just need to settle in and watch professional actors cracking up, over and over. That's what we have for you today.

In the two videos below, we get a total of 18 minutes of Seinfeld bloopers, specifically focused on Julia Louis-Dreyfus. When Louis-Dreyfus cracks up, Seinfeld can't help but make it worse, goading her. It's delightful.

Sample quote (during an extended break):

Seinfeld: "We won an Emmy, you know."

Louis-Dreyfus: "Yeah, but I didn't."

Her individual Seinfeld Emmy arrived in 1996; the show started winning in 1992. But in September 2017, Louis-Dreyfus—who turns 57 years old today—set a couple of Emmy records when she won her sixth award for playing Selina Meyer on Veep.

SECTIONS

arrow
LIVE SMARTER
More from mental floss studios