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11 Moons You Should Get to Know

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You may have heard already that a fifth moon was discovered orbiting Pluto. (If not, Hubble spotted a fifth moon orbiting Pluto.) We know just enough about P5 to know that it's tiny, and it's a moon. Here are some other wild and wonderful worlds that orbit other worlds:

1. Phobos

The larger and innermost moon of Mars, Phobos is probably a captured asteroid. It's covered in craters, including the gigantic Stickney Crater created by an impact that was nearly severe enough to destroy the moon altogether. It orbits very close to Mars, so close that a person on the surface might see Phobos rise twice a day, and eclipses are common. It's so low, in fact, that when meteorites strike Mars, Phobos plows through the debris. Because it's tidally locked, one side always faces forwards, and passing through impact debris has left long grooves radiating away from the leading point. Tidal interactions are slowly dragging Phobos lower and lower. Once it drops low enough, it will shatter from the strain, forming a rocky ring around the planet for a while before it all falls out of orbit and rains down on Mars. Given how many crater chains and crazy-big craters there are on Mars, this has probably happened before.

Phobos, taken by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter; Stickney Crater is at lower right

2. Io

Io is the innermost of the four moons that Galileo spotted around Jupiter in 1610. When Voyager 1 made the first close flyby of Io, astronomer Linda Morabito spotted something shocking in the image data: it was the dome-shaped plume of a gigantic volcano, one of more than 400 that dot the moon. Io is unusual for an outer-solar system moon, being made mostly of rock rather than ice, but it is constantly pulled and stressed by Jupiter and its orbital resonance with Ganymede and Europa. Huge mountains on Io have been lifted up as chunks of sulfurous crust tip on their sides from the strain, floating above an ocean of magma. It is far more geologically active than any other body in the solar system, including Earth, and its surface changes substantially in short periods of time as volcanoes spew lava for hundreds of kilometers. They also spew charged dust hundreds of kilometers into space where it is captured into Jupiter's radiation belts, creating a band called the Io torus, driving auroras on Jupiter, and powering a natural maser that can be picked up by ham radio gear on Earth.

Above: First view of an Ioan volcano by Voyager 1; the "dome" at top left is the plume of the volcano Pele


Io, taken by Galileo Orbiter; the bright red ring at lower left is material deposited by the volcano Pele, in the middle of the ring. The dark patch at the upper right edge of the ring is Pillan Patera, and did not exist on Galileo's previous pass by Io

3. Ganymede

The largest moon in our solar system and the third of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, Ganymede is a rocky iceball -- or an icy rockball, depending on your perspective. Bigger than Mercury (though less massive) and more like a planet than a moon, Ganymede has a proper magnetosphere, probably generated within a liquid iron core, and it is believed to also have a subsurface saltwater ocean. It is no longer being heated by the tidal resonance with Io and Europa, and so its surface is older, alternating young-ish areas of light, grooved terrain and dark, ancient surfaces covered in impact craters. It has many crater chains, probably caused by broken-up comets captured by Jupiter, just like Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, which impacted Jupiter in 1994.


Ganymede in color, by Galileo, and a close-up of Enki Catena, one of the clearest crater chains

4. Titan

The second-largest moon in the solar system, Saturn's Titan is the only moon with a substantial atmosphere, which is much deeper than Earth's. It's so thick and the gravity so weak, in fact, that you could strap wings on your arms and flap them like a bird to fly. The air is mostly nitrogen, but the rest is mostly hydrocarbons, giving Titan's atmosphere a thick orange smoggy haze that is opaque to visible light. Cassini studies Titan in infrared light (which can penetrate the haze) and with radar -- and in 2004, via the Huygens Probe, an atmosphere probe became the first spacecraft to transmit from the surface of a moon other than our own. Titan is remarkably earthlike, apart from being so cold that water is as hard as rock; in addition to the atmosphere, it is the only place other than Earth known to have bodies of liquid on the surface -- lakes as large as the Great Lakes, except that it's not water: it's probably methane or ethane. The climate is probably similar to some of our deserts, with gigantic monsoons perhaps once a decade or more, and long droughts between. NASA scientists are working on a mission called Titan Mare Explorer (TiME) specifically to study the lakes of Titan.


Titan with Saturn, by Cassini


Radar image of lakes and rivers on Titan, and Huygens' last image of the surface of Titan; notice the rounded shapes of the pebbles, as if worn by liquid, and erosion patterns below them just like under river rocks on Earth.

5. Enceladus

This moon of Saturn is the shiniest thing in the solar system, as bright as freshly fallen snow. Its density suggests it is made almost entirely of water ice, and the widespread smooth, young terrain on its southern hemisphere is a sign of active volcanism. When Cassini arrived, it proved scientists right: not only did Enceladus have cryovolcanism, but it still does. Water is being spewed thousands of kilometers out into space from cracks around the southern pole of Enceladus, feeding Saturn's diffuse E ring, and proving directly for the first time that at least one place in the solar system has a subsurface ocean. The Cassini spacecraft has actually flown through these plumes and sampled the material directly, the only time material from another moon has been directly studied. Because Enceladus is geologically active and definitely possesses water, some scientists think it could support life, but of course there is no way to tell right now. The idea was bolstered, however, when Cassini detected hydrocarbons in the material spewed out from the interior, showing that the materials needed for life do exist there.

6. Hyperion

Hyperion is a porous, jumbled mass of ice and a bit of rock tumbling chaotically as it goes around Saturn. It's one of the oddest looking moons in the solar system; it looks very much like a sea sponge. It is covered with sharp craters on top of craters, with dark hydrocarbons filling their bottoms and making them look like deep holes. Though it's hard to see amid all the other craters, there is one staggeringly larger crater nearly as wide as the moon itself; it's amazing it didn't break the moon apart. Its density is very low, suggesting it is probably a rubble pile. All the other moons, like our Moon, always show the same face, but Hyperion doesn't; it's constantly tugged and yanked by the gravity of other moons, making it totally impossible to predict how long a day will last, or where the sun will rise tomorrow.


Hyperion, enhanced color, by Cassini

7. Iapetus

Hyperion's not the only weird thing orbiting Saturn; the third largest moon of Saturn is a mysterious world called Iapetus. When Giovanni Cassini discovered the moon in 1671, he realized he could only see it on one side and deduced that its leading side must be black and its trailing side must be white. Voyager finally proved him right in 1980, but the dark leading side, called Cassini Regio, remained mysterious until its namesake spacecraft arrived in 2004. The Cassini probe revealed that it's overlaid with a thin layer of dark material, possibly blasted off of Phoebe and very similar to the dark material in Hyperion's craters, but found even bigger mysteries that nobody had imagined. Iapetus is severely cratered, with an ancient surface that shouldn't be as bright as it is, and some extremely large craters and a huge equatorial ridge, thirteen kilometers high, which nearly encircles the moon. It looks a bit like the Death Star.


Iapetus light side (false color) and dark side (grayscale) by Cassini; note the huge ridge and many enormous craters

8. Prometheus

Bigger than Phobos but much farther away, Saturn's Prometheus was the ninth moon discovered in Voyager 1 data. It's a lumpy, irregular chunk of cratered ice, unremarkable except for what it does to Saturn's narrow F ring. The F ring is a very thin band with peculiar features, and scientists had struggled to explain why ever since Pioneer 11 had first spotted it. The answer is that it is "shepherded" gravitationally by two tiny moons: Prometheus, which orbits inside the ring, and Pandora, which orbits just outside. The two moons push material in towards the ring, and when they get close, carve grooves and channels in it and and steal material out of it. Although the moon is certainly not geologically active, the craters are not sharp and distinct as on many other bodies; it appears to be covered in a thick layer of dust. The singer Enya was inspired by the dance of Prometheus and Pandora, and wrote a song called "Shepherd Moons" about them.


Prometheus, dragging material off of the F-ring and creating a wave in its wake

9. Miranda

Uranus is a very strange planet in its own right, with its axis tilted on its side producing wild seasonal shifts, and a magnetic axis that is so off-center it doesn't even pass through the planet's core. But most of its moons seem fairly ordinary -- except for Miranda. It's made mostly of ice, but it looks very much as if a giant smashed it apart and then put it back together blindfolded, leaving its surface a radical mishmash of dissimilar terrain. This may be an illusion; it's possible all of this was caused by volcanism as Miranda wandered in and out of orbital resonances with other moons of Uranus, but the more intriguing notion is that it really was smashed apart, with the different terrains resulting as the chunks recoalesced. Until another spacecraft visits Uranus, we will never know.


Miranda, by Voyager 2

10. Triton

Triton is the only large moon of Neptune, and probably doesn't belong there: although it has a nearly perfect orbit and rotates synchronously, it cannot possibly have formed there because its orbit is retrograde -- it goes around Neptune in the opposite direction to the planet's rotation. This causes tidal interactions that lower Triton's orbit; like Phobos, this moon is ultimately doomed. In about 3.6 billion years, it will be within Neptune's Roche limit and shatter into a billion pieces, creating a shining ring system like Saturn's. Triton has a lot in common with Kuiper belt objects such as Pluto, and since Neptune is in an orbital resonance with Pluto, Triton may be somehow related to Pluto; some scientists suspect that Triton had a large moon similar to Charon, and that interactions with Neptune caused that moon to be ejected and Triton to be captured, becoming a moon itself and probably ejecting any large moons that Neptune already had. Triton is mostly made of rock and water ice, with a smattering of other ices. It's also geologically active, and was the second place after Earth where volcanism was seen -- cryovolcanoes have massively resurfaced large areas, and Voyager 2 photographed towering geysers of nitrogen gas and dust spewing up to 8 kilometers into space.


Above: From Voyager 2, this is Triton's strange, "cantaloupe" textured surface; the dark smudges in the white region are geyser plumes

11. Charon

Charon is the largest satellite of Pluto, so big that Pluto and Charon are sometimes called a double planet -- their center of gravity is out in open space, and Pluto and Charon really orbit one another! (They're also joined by four smaller moons: Nix, Hydra, and the yet-unnamed P4 and P5.) Pluto and Charon are also unusual for being mutually synchronous -- not only does Charon face the same side towards Pluto, but Pluto also faces the same side towards Charon. So if you stood on Pluto, underneath Charon, and looked up, you would see Charon fixed immobile in the sky while the stars wheeled endlessly by in the background. (The brightest of those would be the Sun, too dim at this distance to wash out all the other stars in the sky.) To date, this moon has never been visited, and our best pictures are vague images from the Hubble space telescope. But that will change in July 2015, when the New Horizons probe will make its brief visit to this distant system on its way out of our solar system.

Above: The Pluto system, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The biggest thing is Pluto, the second biggest is Charon, and the two other objects are Nix and Hydra; P4 and P5 are not visible in this image


The Pluto system, featuring all 5 of Pluto's satellites

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iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva
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Man Buys Two Metric Tons of LEGO Bricks; Sorts Them Via Machine Learning
May 21, 2017
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iStock // Ekaterina Minaeva

Jacques Mattheij made a small, but awesome, mistake. He went on eBay one evening and bid on a bunch of bulk LEGO brick auctions, then went to sleep. Upon waking, he discovered that he was the high bidder on many, and was now the proud owner of two tons of LEGO bricks. (This is about 4400 pounds.) He wrote, "[L]esson 1: if you win almost all bids you are bidding too high."

Mattheij had noticed that bulk, unsorted bricks sell for something like €10/kilogram, whereas sets are roughly €40/kg and rare parts go for up to €100/kg. Much of the value of the bricks is in their sorting. If he could reduce the entropy of these bins of unsorted bricks, he could make a tidy profit. While many people do this work by hand, the problem is enormous—just the kind of challenge for a computer. Mattheij writes:

There are 38000+ shapes and there are 100+ possible shades of color (you can roughly tell how old someone is by asking them what lego colors they remember from their youth).

In the following months, Mattheij built a proof-of-concept sorting system using, of course, LEGO. He broke the problem down into a series of sub-problems (including "feeding LEGO reliably from a hopper is surprisingly hard," one of those facts of nature that will stymie even the best system design). After tinkering with the prototype at length, he expanded the system to a surprisingly complex system of conveyer belts (powered by a home treadmill), various pieces of cabinetry, and "copious quantities of crazy glue."

Here's a video showing the current system running at low speed:

The key part of the system was running the bricks past a camera paired with a computer running a neural net-based image classifier. That allows the computer (when sufficiently trained on brick images) to recognize bricks and thus categorize them by color, shape, or other parameters. Remember that as bricks pass by, they can be in any orientation, can be dirty, can even be stuck to other pieces. So having a flexible software system is key to recognizing—in a fraction of a second—what a given brick is, in order to sort it out. When a match is found, a jet of compressed air pops the piece off the conveyer belt and into a waiting bin.

After much experimentation, Mattheij rewrote the software (several times in fact) to accomplish a variety of basic tasks. At its core, the system takes images from a webcam and feeds them to a neural network to do the classification. Of course, the neural net needs to be "trained" by showing it lots of images, and telling it what those images represent. Mattheij's breakthrough was allowing the machine to effectively train itself, with guidance: Running pieces through allows the system to take its own photos, make a guess, and build on that guess. As long as Mattheij corrects the incorrect guesses, he ends up with a decent (and self-reinforcing) corpus of training data. As the machine continues running, it can rack up more training, allowing it to recognize a broad variety of pieces on the fly.

Here's another video, focusing on how the pieces move on conveyer belts (running at slow speed so puny humans can follow). You can also see the air jets in action:

In an email interview, Mattheij told Mental Floss that the system currently sorts LEGO bricks into more than 50 categories. It can also be run in a color-sorting mode to bin the parts across 12 color groups. (Thus at present you'd likely do a two-pass sort on the bricks: once for shape, then a separate pass for color.) He continues to refine the system, with a focus on making its recognition abilities faster. At some point down the line, he plans to make the software portion open source. You're on your own as far as building conveyer belts, bins, and so forth.

Check out Mattheij's writeup in two parts for more information. It starts with an overview of the story, followed up with a deep dive on the software. He's also tweeting about the project (among other things). And if you look around a bit, you'll find bulk LEGO brick auctions online—it's definitely a thing!

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8 Common Dog Behaviors, Decoded
May 25, 2017
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Dogs are a lot more complicated than we give them credit for. As a result, sometimes things get lost in translation. We’ve yet to invent a dog-to-English translator, but there are certain behaviors you can learn to read in order to better understand what your dog is trying to tell you. The more tuned-in you are to your dog’s emotions, the better you’ll be able to respond—whether that means giving her some space or welcoming a wet, slobbery kiss. 

1. What you’ll see: Your dog is standing with his legs and body relaxed and tail low. His ears are up, but not pointed forward. His mouth is slightly open, he’s panting lightly, and his tongue is loose. His eyes? Soft or maybe slightly squinty from getting his smile on.

What it means: “Hey there, friend!” Your pup is in a calm, relaxed state. He’s open to mingling, which means you can feel comfortable letting friends say hi.

2. What you’ll see: Your dog is standing with her body leaning forward. Her ears are erect and angled forward—or have at least perked up if they’re floppy—and her mouth is closed. Her tail might be sticking out horizontally or sticking straight up and wagging slightly.

What it means: “Hark! Who goes there?!” Something caught your pup’s attention and now she’s on high alert, trying to discern whether or not the person, animal, or situation is a threat. She’ll likely stay on guard until she feels safe or becomes distracted.

3. What you’ll see: Your dog is standing, leaning slightly forward. His body and legs are tense, and his hackles—those hairs along his back and neck—are raised. His tail is stiff and twitching, not swooping playfully. His mouth is open, teeth are exposed, and he may be snarling, snapping, or barking excessively.

What it means: “Don’t mess with me!” This dog is asserting his social dominance and letting others know that he might attack if they don’t defer accordingly. A dog in this stance could be either offensively aggressive or defensively aggressive. If you encounter a dog in this state, play it safe and back away slowly without making eye contact.

4. What you’ll see: As another dog approaches, your dog lies down on his back with his tail tucked in between his legs. His paws are tucked in too, his ears are flat, and he isn’t making direct eye contact with the other dog standing over him.

What it means: “I come in peace!” Your pooch is displaying signs of submission to a more dominant dog, conveying total surrender to avoid physical confrontation. Other, less obvious, signs of submission include ears that are flattened back against the head, an avoidance of eye contact, a tongue flick, and bared teeth. Yup—a dog might bare his teeth while still being submissive, but they’ll likely be clenched together, the lips opened horizontally rather than curled up to show the front canines. A submissive dog will also slink backward or inward rather than forward, which would indicate more aggressive behavior.

5. What you’ll see: Your dog is crouching with her back hunched, tail tucked, and the corner of her mouth pulled back with lips slightly curled. Her shoulders, or hackles, are raised and her ears are flattened. She’s avoiding eye contact.

What it means: “I’m scared, but will fight you if I have to.” This dog’s fight or flight instincts have been activated. It’s best to keep your distance from a dog in this emotional state because she could attack if she feels cornered.

6. What you’ll see: You’re staring at your dog, holding eye contact. Your dog looks away from you, tentatively looks back, then looks away again. After some time, he licks his chops and yawns.

What it means: “I don’t know what’s going on and it’s weirding me out.” Your dog doesn’t know what to make of the situation, but rather than nipping or barking, he’ll stick to behaviors he knows are OK, like yawning, licking his chops, or shaking as if he’s wet. You’ll want to intervene by removing whatever it is causing him discomfort—such as an overly grabby child—and giving him some space to relax.

7. What you’ll see: Your dog has her front paws bent and lowered onto the ground with her rear in the air. Her body is relaxed, loose, and wiggly, and her tail is up and wagging from side to side. She might also let out a high-pitched or impatient bark.

What it means: “What’s the hold up? Let’s play!” This classic stance, known to dog trainers and behaviorists as “the play bow,” is a sign she’s ready to let the good times roll. Get ready for a round of fetch or tug of war, or for a good long outing at the dog park.

8. What you’ll see: You’ve just gotten home from work and your dog rushes over. He can’t stop wiggling his backside, and he may even lower himself into a giant stretch, like he’s doing yoga.

What it means: “OhmygoshImsohappytoseeyou I love you so much you’re my best friend foreverandeverandever!!!!” This one’s easy: Your pup is overjoyed his BFF is back. That big stretch is something dogs don’t pull out for just anyone; they save that for the people they truly love. Show him you feel the same way with a good belly rub and a handful of his favorite treats.

The best way to say “I love you” in dog? A monthly subscription to BarkBox. Your favorite pup will get a package filled with treats, toys, and other good stuff (and in return, you’ll probably get lots of sloppy kisses). Visit BarkBox to learn more.

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