24 Adorable Photos of Presidents With Little Kids

Pete Souza, White House via Twitter
Pete Souza, White House via Twitter

Pete Souza/White House

After TIME named Barack Obama its Person of the Year, it released a series of photos by Pete Souza—which included the adorable photo above, of the president pretending to get caught in Spider-Man's web (Spider-Man, in this case, was the child of a White House staff member). That inspired us to dig up other aww-inducing photos of presidents with kids.

Speak softly and hug tight: Teddy Roosevelt shows us his soft side, hugging granddaughter Edith Roosevelt Derby in 1918.

President Taft plays with a baby, circa 1909.

The Dog Days of the Presidency: President Lyndon B. Johnson howls skyward with his dog, Yuki, in 1968. Grandson Patrick Nugent looks on, wondering why adults are so darn weird.

Ronald Reagan dines with his pen pal, six-year-old Rudy Hines, in 1984.

Move over, Secret Service. Two brave cowboys pose with Warren G. Harding and his pup, Laddie boy.

Harding does what presidents do best—he holds a baby. In this 1923 photo, he stands with farmers from Hutchinson, Kansas.

Pound it: George W. Bush tries his best at fist bumping in 2008.

Photo by Suzanne Plunkett via Suprmchaos.

Shortly after leaving office, President Bill Clinton spent some time downtown playing tag with kids at the Family Life Academy of the Latino Pastoral Action Center in New York.

A little girl whispers into Ronald Reagan’s ear in 1984. It must’ve been Top Secret.

This unidentified child looks thrilled to meet Richard Nixon at Pennsylvania Station in Pittsburgh.

President Gerald Ford and James Paxson meet with Nebraska’s littlest dignitaries while opening the Ford Birthsite Park in Omaha, 1976.

Photo courtesy Stanley Tretick/Look Magazine

Playing Politics: President Kennedy may have run the country, but in this 1963 photo, John Jr. shows us who runs the household. Here, the two-year-old tot plays under Kennedy’s desk in the oval office.

President Reagan poses with Drew Barrymore at a ceremony launching the Young Astronauts program in 1984. In his diary, Reagan wrote, “Little Drew Barrymore—the child in E.T.—was one of the children [I met]. She’s a nice little person.”

When a troupe of movie stars visited President Harry Truman in 1946, child actress Margaret O’Brien plopped a close seat by Mr. President. Two years earlier, O’Brien had starred as “Tootie” in Meet Me in St. Louis with Judy Garland. Other notables in the photo include Angela Lansbury (top left) and Cesar Romero (top right).

One year before becoming president, Franklin D. Roosevelt built a small house in Warm Springs, Georgia. The area boasted natural, 88-degree springs, and FDR believed the waters could heal his leg ailments. He bought acres of land and established the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation, which was exclusively devoted to polio patients. Here, FDR mingles with two young patients at the Institute.

In one of the few photos of FDR in a wheelchair, the president, his terrier Fala, and a friend’s granddaughter play at Hill Top Cottage in Hyde Park, N.Y., February 1941.

Photo courtesy of Stanford News

Long before Herbert Hoover became president, he was founder and head of the American Relief Administration (ARA). During World War One, Hoover helped feed more than 2 million Poles per day. In this picture, Hoover walks with a crowd of Polish children.

Pete Souza/White House

One more of President Obama.

Nice handiwork. Three years before Calvin Coolidge was installed into office, he spent a July day building a cart with his son.

James A. Garfield sits at his desk with daughter Mary a few years before assuming the Presidency.

Image courtesy of the Boy Scouts of America

Shoulders back! President William H. Taft surveys a troop of Boy Scouts. In 1910, Taft became the honorary president of the Boy Scouts.

Lowriding: President George H.W. Bush pulls his grandson, Sam LeBlond, behind a bicycle in Kennebunkport in 1989.

Lincoln reads with his son, Tad, in February 1865. This is the only known picture of Lincoln wearing spectacles.

The 10 Best Air Fryers on Amazon

Cosori/Amazon
Cosori/Amazon

When it comes to making food that’s delicious, quick, and easy, you can’t go wrong with an air fryer. They require only a fraction of the oil that traditional fryers do, so you get that same delicious, crispy texture of the fried foods you love while avoiding the extra calories and fat you don’t.

But with so many air fryers out there, it can be tough to choose the one that’ll work best for you. To make your life easier—and get you closer to that tasty piece of fried chicken—we’ve put together a list of some of Amazon’s top-rated air frying gadgets. Each of the products below has at least a 4.5-star rating and over 1200 user reviews, so you can stop dreaming about the perfect dinner and start eating it instead.

1. Ultrean Air Fryer; $76

Ultrean/Amazon

Around 84 percent of reviewers awarded the Ultrean Air Fryer five stars on Amazon, making it one of the most popular models on the site. This 4.2-quart oven doesn't just fry, either—it also grills, roasts, and bakes via its innovative rapid air technology heating system. It's available in four different colors (red, light blue, black, and white), making it the perfect accent piece for any kitchen.

Buy it: Amazon

2. Cosori Air Fryer; $120

Cosori/Amazon

This highly celebrated air fryer from Cosori will quickly become your favorite sous chef. With 11 one-touch presets for frying favorites, like bacon, veggies, and fries, you can take the guesswork out of cooking and let the Cosori do the work instead. One reviewer who “absolutely hates cooking” said, after using it, “I'm actually excited to cook for the first time ever.” You’ll feel the same way!

Buy it: Amazon

3. Innsky Air Fryer; $90

Innsky/Amazon

With its streamlined design and the ability to cook with little to no oil, the Innsky air fryer will make you feel like the picture of elegance as you chow down on a piece of fried shrimp. You can set a timer on the fryer so it starts cooking when you want it to, and it automatically shuts off when the cooking time is done (a great safety feature for chefs who get easily distracted).

Buy it: Amazon

4. Secura Air Fryer; $62

Secura/Amazon

This air fryer from Secura uses a combination of heating techniques—hot air and high-speed air circulation—for fast and easy food prep. And, as one reviewer remarked, with an extra-large 4.2-quart basket “[it’s] good for feeding a crowd, which makes it a great option for large families.” This fryer even comes with a toaster rack and skewers, making it a great addition to a neighborhood barbecue or family glamping trip.

Buy it: Amazon

5. Chefman Turbo Fry; $60

Chefman/Amazon

For those of you really looking to cut back, the Chefman Turbo Fry uses 98 percent less oil than traditional fryers, according to the manufacturer. And with its two-in-one tank basket that allows you to cook multiple items at the same time, you can finally stop using so many pots and pans when you’re making dinner.

Buy it: Amazon

6. Ninja Air Fryer; $100

Ninja/Amazon

The Ninja Air Fryer is a multipurpose gadget that allows you to do far more than crisp up your favorite foods. This air fryer’s one-touch control panel lets you air fry, roast, reheat, or even dehydrate meats, fruits, and veggies, whether your ingredients are fresh or frozen. And the simple interface means that you're only a couple buttons away from a homemade dinner.

Buy it: Amazon

7. Instant Pot Air Fryer + Electronic Pressure Cooker; $180

Instant Pot/Amazon

Enjoy all the perks of an Instant Pot—the ability to serve as a pressure cooker, slow cooker, yogurt maker, and more—with a lid that turns the whole thing into an air fryer as well. The multi-level fryer basket has a broiling tray to ensure even crisping throughout, and it’s big enough to cook a meal for up to eight. If you’re more into a traditional air fryer, check out Instant Pot’s new Instant Vortex Pro ($140) air fryer, which gives you the ability to bake, proof, toast, and more.

Buy it: Amazon

8. Omorc Habor Air Fryer; $100

Omorc Habor/Amazon

With a 5.8-quart capacity, this air fryer from Omorc Habor is larger than most, giving you the flexibility of cooking dinner for two or a spread for a party. To give you a clearer picture of the size, its square fryer basket, built to maximize cooking capacity, can handle a five-pound chicken (or all the fries you could possibly eat). Plus, with a non-stick coating and dishwasher-safe basket and frying pot, this handy appliance practically cleans itself.

Buy it: Amazon

9. Dash Deluxe Air Fryer; $100

Dash/Amazon

Dash’s air fryer might look retro, but its high-tech cooking ability is anything but. Its generously sized frying basket can fry up to two pounds of French fries or two dozen wings, and its cool touch handle makes it easy (and safe) to use. And if you're still stumped on what to actually cook once you get your Dash fryer, you'll get a free recipe guide in the box filled with tips and tricks to get the most out of your meal.

Buy it: Amazon

10. Bella Air Fryer; $52

Bella/Amazon

This petite air fryer from Bella may be on the smaller side, but it still packs a powerful punch. Its 2.6-quart frying basket makes it an ideal choice for couples or smaller families—all you have to do is set the temperature and timer, and throw your food inside. Once the meal is ready, its indicator light will ding to let you know that it’s time to eat.

Buy it: Amazon

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What Benefits Do Presidents Get After They Leave Office?

Barack Obama walks on the colonnade after leaving the Oval Office for the last time as President on January 20, 2017.
Barack Obama walks on the colonnade after leaving the Oval Office for the last time as President on January 20, 2017.
Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Former presidents have pursued a range of careers after departing the Oval Office. While many presidents have written books or made post-office careers of giving speeches to earn income, others have started nonprofit organizations to continue the charitable endeavors they were able to support during their presidential tenures. William Howard Taft took a different route when he went on to become a Supreme Court Justice. But after holding the highest office in the land, are presidents working because they have to—or because they want to? And what retirement benefits, if any, do former commanders-in-chief get?

According to the Former Presidents Act, which was passed in 1958, ex-presidents are entitled to a handful of benefits following their presidency, including a pension and funds for travel, office space, and personal staff. Dwight D. Eisenhower passed the act largely to help Harry Truman, who struggled to support himself after leaving the White House. Truman turned down a slew of cushy job offers, explaining that, "I could never lend myself to any transaction, however respectable, that would commercialize on the prestige and dignity of the office of the Presidency."

Today, more than 60 years later, former presidents can thank the Former Presidents Act and similar legislation for their lifelong benefits. The Secretary of the Treasury currently pays a lifetime annual pension of just north of $200,000 to Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama. If a former president dies before their spouse, the spouse gets an annual pension of $20,000 as well as franked mail privileges and lifelong Secret Service protection (unless they remarry).

The Government Services Administration pays for office space, furniture, staff, and supplies. It also reimburses them for their move out of the White House and any work-related travel they do. The amount of money former presidents get for their office space and staff varies. In 2010, for example, Carter’s office in Atlanta came in at $102,000 per year, while Bill Clinton’s New York office was $516,000.

Besides a pension and office-related funds, former presidents get lifelong Secret Service protection for themselves, their spouses, and their children under 16. In 1985, 11 years after resigning the presidency, former President Richard Nixon decided to forgo his Secret Service detail. Claiming that he wanted to save the U.S. government money—his Secret Service protection cost an estimated $3 million each year—Nixon opted to pay for his own bodyguard protection rather than have taxpayers fund it. Although Nixon was the only president to refuse Secret Service protection, his wife opted to drop her protection one year earlier.

Nixon's decision to resign the office of the presidency was probably a smart decision, financially speaking, as the Act indicates that a president who is forced out of office via impeachment would not be entitled to these post-presidency benefits. But because Nixon resigned before he could be impeached, the Department of Justice ruled that Nixon should be eligible to receive the same financial benefits of his fellow former presidents. Similarly, because Clinton was impeached but acquitted, his retirement benefits were safe.

Some critics point out that living former presidents, with their millions of dollars of income from speeches and books, shouldn’t use taxpayer money to supplement their already vast incomes. But it looks like benefits for former presidents are here to stay.

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