Inside a $10K Luxury Train Ride Across Japan

Courtesy East Japan Railway Company
Courtesy East Japan Railway Company

If you’ve got a lot of time and don’t care much about comfort, you can get across Japan for less than $30 a day. But if that’s not quite your style, there is a far better—and far pricier—alternative. You could shell out $10,000 for a luxury sleeper train that will take you across the country in true comfort.

As Mashable reports, the East Japan Railway Company’s Train Suite Shiki-Shima began making voyages on May 1, and its passengers have been riding in high style ever since. The train offers 17 double-occupancy cabins, with a lounge car, a dining room, and two observatory cars.

The trip "offers you a prime view of Japan’s rich, beautiful natural scenery, the local industries of each region and the unique culture that permeates Japanese people’s daily lives," according to the railway’s website.

The seasonal trips are two, three, or four days long and cover 620 to 1120 miles in total, with all meals included, with daily sightseeing trips. The food aboard the train is coordinated with the destinations out the window, so you eat dishes prepared by local chefs featuring ingredients from the region.

A female crew member in a brown uniform stands between two twin beds made up with white sheets in the Shiki-Shima luxury suite
The Shiki-Shima luxury suite, pictured here, has two levels.
STR/AFP/Getty Images

The elite trips come at a cost: A three-day, two-night trip staying in the train’s fanciest cabin, the Shiki-Shima Suite, costs more than $9300 for a single passenger, and around $6200 per person for a couple. The same trip costs almost $4500 per person for the lowest-level double-occupancy cabin.

a view of a glass-walled train car with a bar at one end of the car, square tables with blue chairs at the other end, and a staircase leading downstairs
Courtesy East Japan Railway Company

a wood-lined interior of a train car with a table and two seats next to the window and Japanese screens dividing the room
Courtesy East Japan Railway Company

Tickets are already sold out until March 2018, but you can keep an eye out for openings on the East Japan Railway website. You'll have to submit an application for tickets, and if there is more interest than there are tickets, winners will be chosen by lottery.

[h/t Mashable]

This $49 Video Game Design Course Will Teach You Everything From Coding to Digital Art Skills

EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images
EvgeniyShkolenko/iStock via Getty Images

If you spend the bulk of your free time playing video games and want to elevate your hobby into a career, you can take advantage of the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, which is currently on sale for just $49. You can jump into your education as a beginner, or at any other skill level, to learn what you need to know about game development, design, coding, and artistry skills.

Gaming is a competitive industry, and understanding just programming or just artistry isn’t enough to land a job. The School of Game Design’s lifetime membership is set up to educate you in both fields so your resume and work can stand out.

The lifetime membership that’s currently discounted is intended to allow you to learn at your own pace so you don’t burn out, which would be pretty difficult to do because the lessons have you building advanced games in just your first few hours of learning. The remote classes will train you with step-by-step, hands-on projects that more than 50,000 other students around the world can vouch for.

Once you’ve nailed the basics, the lifetime membership provides unlimited access to thousands of dollars' worth of royalty-free game art and textures to use in your 2D or 3D designs. Support from instructors and professionals with over 16 years of game industry experience will guide you from start to finish, where you’ll be equipped to land a job doing something you truly love.

Earn money doing what you love with an education from the School of Game Design’s lifetime membership, currently discounted at $49.

 

School of Game Design: Lifetime Membership - $49

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Instead of Taco Tuesday, Sweden Celebrates Taco Friday (or Taco Fredag)

ptpower, iStock via Getty Images
ptpower, iStock via Getty Images

If you think Swedish cuisine is limited to meatballs and herring, you've never celebrated Fredagsmys—the Swedish version of Taco Tuesday. The day, which translates to "cozy Fridays," is a chance for Swedes to get together with loved ones and eat comfort food at the end of a long week. And instead of indulging in more traditional Swedish fare, the Fredagsmys cuisine of choice is Tex-Mex.

Fredagsmys takes the already-Americanized taco and puts a Swedish spin on it. On Taco Fredag (Taco Friday), ingredients like tortillas, ground meat, peppers, and tomatoes are laid out smörgåsbord-style. The spread may also include some toppings that are rarely served with tacos outside of Scandinavia, such as yogurt, cucumber, peanuts, and pineapple. After assembling their meal, diners enjoy it in a cozy spot in front of the TV, ideally surrounded by pillows and candles.

The Swedish tradition of starting the weekend with a taco feast has only been around for a couple of decades. In the 1990s, the Swedish potato chip company OLW introduced the slogan “Now it’s cozy Friday time” into the national lexicon. Old El Paso capitalized on this concept with its own ad campaign showing Swedes how to assemble tacos at home. The Swedish spice company Santa Maria noticed the emerging trend and further popularized the idea of eating tacos on Fridays in its TV advertisements.

Tacos may be the food that's most closely associated with Fredagsmys today, but any quick junk food is appropriate for the occasion. Burgers and pizza are also popular items, as are candy, chips, and popcorn. The meal makes up just one part of the night: Settling in on the couch in pajamas to watch TV with loved ones is just as important as the food.

Making time for comforting indoor activities is a necessity in Sweden, where the weather is harsh and daylight is scarce for much of the year. The Danish do something similar with hygge, although tacos aren't an explicit part of that tradition.